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Sabina

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1987 | PERRY C. RIDDLE
Abraham Lenkawicki was raised by his grandmother in Warsaw, lived in Siberia for a year during World War II and went to Israel after the war. He moved to Brooklyn in 1972 and to California in 1976. Lenkawicki, 72, is semi-retired and a college student. He and his wife, Sabina, live in Burbank. I grew up in Warsaw in a Jewish family. I was orphaned at 10. My grandma raised me to be a good man. Old people were a big part of life in Europe. We've lost that here in the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
April 25, 2014 | Mark Paredes
She had me at privyet . I had just delivered a talk in Romania on Jewish-Mormon relations (a niche topic, to be sure) at a church in Bucharest, and standing before me was Florina, a raven-haired beauty who greeted me in Russian after learning we had both lived in Moscow. Then she switched to English, which she had acquired as an au pair in London. I was a never-married bachelor in my early 40s and had begun to doubt that Miss Right and I would ever cross paths, much less during a speaking tour of Eastern Europe.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 25, 2014 | Mark Paredes
She had me at privyet . I had just delivered a talk in Romania on Jewish-Mormon relations (a niche topic, to be sure) at a church in Bucharest, and standing before me was Florina, a raven-haired beauty who greeted me in Russian after learning we had both lived in Moscow. Then she switched to English, which she had acquired as an au pair in London. I was a never-married bachelor in my early 40s and had begun to doubt that Miss Right and I would ever cross paths, much less during a speaking tour of Eastern Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
To say the topic of screenwriter Sabina Berman's latest movie is bleak would be an understatement. So would labeling the decision to film in Mexico's deadliest city a "challenge." The film, "Backyard" ("El Traspatio") is a fictionalized account of the unsolved rapes and murders of hundreds of women in Ciudad Juarez, the violent Mexican border town that faces El Paso. Berman, a writer most known for comedies, had to be convinced the project made sense; she was sold after years of research and talking to survivors and some of the thousands of women who work in the vast network of multinational maquiladora assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border that served as the pool for victims.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1997 | Dow Jones
Unidyne Corp. said Tuesday it has acquired Sabina Industries Inc., an Anaheim-based manufacturer of industrial motors, controls and systems, for an undisclosed amount of stock. Sabina, which had revenues of $10.8 million for the year ended March 31, sells direct-current motors and controls to industrial customers in the automotive, materials handling, plastics, printing, textile and wire and cable industries. Unidyne, which reported 1996 revenues of $16.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
"The Caprices," a collection of stories set in the Pacific during World War II, has won the 23rd annual PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction. Author Sabina Murray will receive $15,000. A statement released by the awards foundation Tuesday praised Murray as "unsparing in her images of the physical and psychological horrors of war, its humiliations and brutalities." This year's prize will be presented May 17 in Washington.
SPORTS
December 1, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Maria Sabina, a Mazatec Indian shaman who gained worldwide fame as the "queen of hallucinogenic mushrooms," died at a hospital here Nov. 22. She was 97.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2000
Sabina Wurmbrand, 87, an evangelist who worked to aid persecuted Christians worldwide. Born Sabina Oster into a family of Orthodox Jews living in what was the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Wurmbrand was educated at the Sorbonne. After completing language studies in Paris, she moved to Bucharest, where she married Richard Wurmbrand in 1936. The couple were introduced to Christianity as newlyweds and soon after converted to Anglicanism.
NEWS
September 26, 1996
Sabina Zlatin, 89, who spirited Jewish children to Switzerland to escape the Nazis. A native of Warsaw, Sabina Schwast married a French farmer, Miron Zlatin, and became a French citizen. During World War II, she founded the Children's Home of Izieu and helped more than 100 Jewish children elude capture by Germans and escape over the Swiss border. But on April 6, 1944, Nazis seized seven teachers and 44 children as they were eating breakfast. Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1993 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI
In its fine new debut album "Santa Sabina" and in a soaring show last summer at the Coconut Teaszer, Santa Sabina proved effective both at its darkest and at its hardest. On Saturday at the Palace, however, the Mexico City-based group opted for its somber mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Ginell is a freelancer writer.
Los Angeles Opera's holiday-season go at Bizet's ever-popular tune fest "Carmen" underwent changes in three of the four leading roles Saturday night -- all company debuts. As Carmen, mezzo-soprano Nancy Fabiola Herrera -- who hails from the exotic locale of the Canary Islands -- capably made the conventional transition from sultry vamping to fatalistic dignity, giving us just glimpses of Carmen's allure and fascination.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Something Rotten A Novel Jasper Fforde Viking: 392 pp., $24.95 * A Carnivore's Inquiry A Novel Sabina Murray Grove Press: 296 pp., $23 * Infused with humor and extraordinary inventiveness, "Something Rotten," the fourth in Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next detective series, is pure fun. Part mystery, part fantasy, the series has its own bizarre logic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2004 | Christopher Hampton, Special to The Times
I believe it was in Los Angeles, just over 20 years ago, that I first heard the name of Sabina Spielrein. Film producer Howard Rosenman told me the fascinating story of the Russian doctor, one of the first female psychoanalysts, who, as a teenager, had been one of Carl Jung's patients, had stayed in Zurich to study psychology at the University of Zurich, and who might have had a love affair with Jung.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
"The Caprices," a collection of stories set in the Pacific during World War II, has won the 23rd annual PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction. Author Sabina Murray will receive $15,000. A statement released by the awards foundation Tuesday praised Murray as "unsparing in her images of the physical and psychological horrors of war, its humiliations and brutalities." This year's prize will be presented May 17 in Washington.
BOOKS
January 12, 2003 | Gloria Emerson, Gloria Emerson received the 1978 National Book Award for nonfiction for "Winners and Losers: Battles, Retreats, Gains, Losses and Ruins From the Vietnam War." She is the author, most recently, of "Loving Graham Greene: A Novel."
Soldiers in a war sometimes feel that they are famished, sleepwalking, dehydrated, dazed and doomed, but they can do amazing things in their pitiful state. They can keep killing. Sabina Murray, whose nine short stories stem from the Pacific campaign during World War II, knows a huge amount about armies and war, but in "The Caprices," she also writes about civilians caught in the conflicts: an elderly woman must manage to drag heavy bundles, a little girl plans a murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2000
Sabina Wurmbrand, 87, an evangelist who worked to aid persecuted Christians worldwide. Born Sabina Oster into a family of Orthodox Jews living in what was the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Wurmbrand was educated at the Sorbonne. After completing language studies in Paris, she moved to Bucharest, where she married Richard Wurmbrand in 1936. The couple were introduced to Christianity as newlyweds and soon after converted to Anglicanism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Your eyes don't glide across the colorful surfaces of Sabina Ott's new paintings so much as they get stuck--like a truck in the mud--in the clunky passages of congealed wax the artist has dumped, spilled and splashed over large wood panels.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Your eyes don't glide across the colorful surfaces of Sabina Ott's new paintings so much as they get stuck--like a truck in the mud--in the clunky passages of congealed wax the artist has dumped, spilled and splashed over large wood panels.
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