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Sabine Meyer

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November 3, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
When last heard here, in the fall of 1982, Sabine Meyer was a member of the Berlin Philharmonic, playing a series of concerts under Herbert von Karajan at Ambassador Auditorium. Seven years later, Meyer, now a free-lance clarinetist--in a well-publicized dispute between the late Karajan and the members of the Berlin orchestra, she was not retained--returned to Ambassador as soloist with Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra on Wednesday night.
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January 24, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Since its heyday around the time of Mozart, who attributed to it a "glorious effect," the clarinet has had a pretty hard time. Among its greatest champions were composers such as Carl Maria von Weber and Charles Stanford, who aren't exactly burning up concert programming these days. The instrument is now associated more with New Orleans jazz, or the Yiddish form klezmer, than with classical music. "How do you stop an oboe from being stolen?" goes one musician's joke. "Put it in a clarinet case."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Since its heyday around the time of Mozart, who attributed to it a "glorious effect," the clarinet has had a pretty hard time. Among its greatest champions were composers such as Carl Maria von Weber and Charles Stanford, who aren't exactly burning up concert programming these days. The instrument is now associated more with New Orleans jazz, or the Yiddish form klezmer, than with classical music. "How do you stop an oboe from being stolen?" goes one musician's joke. "Put it in a clarinet case."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
When last heard here, in the fall of 1982, Sabine Meyer was a member of the Berlin Philharmonic, playing a series of concerts under Herbert von Karajan at Ambassador Auditorium. Seven years later, Meyer, now a free-lance clarinetist--in a well-publicized dispute between the late Karajan and the members of the Berlin orchestra, she was not retained--returned to Ambassador as soloist with Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra on Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2006
MARK SWED'S excellent music reviews are knowledgeable and imaginatively written. In his review of the Tokyo String Quartet and Sabine Meyer ["Quartet Settles Into Meyer's Shadow," Jan. 27], however, he strayed too far into fashion commentary. After complimenting Meyer's superb playing but criticizing her work as a part of an ensemble, he went on to characterize her outfit as "larva-like" and her appearance as "primordial." Those insulting adjectives were out of place (particularly since her black dress was, in my opinion, unobtrusive, suitable and elegant)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Herbert von Karajan, the colorful and controversial conductor, stepped down Monday as director of the celebrated Berlin Philharmonic, which many consider the world's best. Karajan, an 81-year-old autocratic Austrian, handed a letter of resignation to the West Berlin senator for cultural affairs in Salzburg, Austria. The senator, Anke Martiny, said that Karajan referred in his letter to his increasing spinal disability, declaring: "The results of the medical examinations I have been undergoing for several weeks indicate that I am not in the position to fulfill my duties as I understand them."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Itzhak Perlman and Glenn Close will host the third annual Ovation Awards--honoring current recordings of classical music and the performers who make them--at Carnegie Hall in New York City Oct. 26. The awards show will be taped for later broadcast on radio and television, according to Sharon Dec, coordinator of the awards for Ovation magazine. In 1988, the awards program was shown on cable (Arts & Entertainment). This year, Dec says, the management is seeking sponsors for network distribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
In 1982, an attractive young woman clarinetist with the smoothest, most fluid tone this side of Benny Goodman attempted to break into the all-male bastion of the Berlin Philharmonic. She lasted a year. The boys in the band said she didn't fit in with their sound. Herbert von Karajan -- the orchestra's famous music director, who was responsible for creating its uniquely cohesive ensemble -- disagreed and resigned in anger. It was all but impossible not to read sexism into the players' attitude.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
Herbert von Karajan, controversial icon of the prestigious Berlin Philharmonic, the Salzburg Festival, the Vienna State Opera and world recording studios, died Sunday at his home in Anif, Austria, of apparent heart failure. He was 81. Although ill, Karajan had planned to conduct the opening opera of the Salzburg Festival, Guiseppe Verdi's "Ballo in Maschera," on July 27, and had regularly conducted rehearsals, according to festival president Albert Moser.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin and Elisabeth Penz, Special to The Times
THERE'S no escaping Mozart here this year. Austria's celebration of its native son's 250th birthday is an artistic and commercial extravaganza calculated to flood the country with tourists and to awe audiences with myriad performances, seminars and tours.
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