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Sabrina Movie

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NEWS
October 5, 1995 | MAUREEN SAJBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When word got out that a modern version of the movie "Sabrina" was in the works, more than a few fashion designers ran out to rent the 1954 original, a charming Cinderella story starring Audrey Heburn as the chauffeur's daughter, Humphrey Bogart as the aging tycoon and William Holden as his playboy brother. The result of their infatuation is sweeping through stores now: a chic '50s look that has nothing to do with the new film and everything to do with the old one.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Is it just me, or are there moments every summer when the desire to escape life as you know it absolutely overwhelms? You've already seen every decent film out there and a few that aren't. Take heart and time travel back to the '50s with the lovely "Sabrina" and the sweet innocence of Audrey Hepburn and a different sort of moviemaking entirely -- quieter, gentler, careful with its emotional punches.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Is it just me, or are there moments every summer when the desire to escape life as you know it absolutely overwhelms? You've already seen every decent film out there and a few that aren't. Take heart and time travel back to the '50s with the lovely "Sabrina" and the sweet innocence of Audrey Hepburn and a different sort of moviemaking entirely -- quieter, gentler, careful with its emotional punches.
NEWS
October 5, 1995 | MAUREEN SAJBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When word got out that a modern version of the movie "Sabrina" was in the works, more than a few fashion designers ran out to rent the 1954 original, a charming Cinderella story starring Audrey Heburn as the chauffeur's daughter, Humphrey Bogart as the aging tycoon and William Holden as his playboy brother. The result of their infatuation is sweeping through stores now: a chic '50s look that has nothing to do with the new film and everything to do with the old one.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1995 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
By traditional TV standards, Greg Kinnear may not yet be a major star--but the wheels are rolling. The boyish, mischievous, 31-year-old has a way of getting noticed, despite his relatively smaller audiences in TV's twilight zones--fringe areas out of the mainstream of prime-time series on the Big Four networks. First came "Talk Soup," an irreverent digest of TV's top talk shows that won a cultlike audience for cable's E! Entertainment channel. That propelled him to NBC and a 1:35 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Not every Kickstarter film-funding effort ends in multimillion-dollar success, a la actor-writer-director Zach Braff's recent campaign or that achieved by the cast and creators of the canceled CW show "Veronica Mars. " Just ask actress Melissa Joan Hart, who failed in her efforts to raise $2 million for a romantic comedy in which she was hoping to star. Turns out fans of the '90s child star -- best known for the "Sabrina the Teenage Witch" TV movie and seriesĀ  -- weren't so interested in watching her play a single thirtysomething forced to attend her sister's wedding solo in Thailand.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1999 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's still Sabrina and she's still a good-hearted witch--but she's not a kid anymore. "I'll be a little more grown-up--and I'm getting a job," says Melissa Joan Hart, looking ahead to her fourth season on ABC's "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch," returning tonight. She's 23 now and playing a supernatural 18-year-old, she'll find comedy in more mature situations--swooning over her new boss, for instance, casting spells in unexpected ways--often with surprising and amusing results.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1995 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
By traditional TV standards, Greg Kinnear may not yet be a major star--but the wheels are rolling. The boyish, mischievous, 31-year-old has a way of getting noticed, despite his relatively smaller audiences in TV's twilight zones--fringe areas out of the mainstream of prime-time series on the Big Four networks. First came "Talk Soup," an irreverent digest of TV's top talk shows that won a cultlike audience for cable's E! Entertainment channel. That propelled him to NBC and a 1:35 a.m.
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