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Saburo Ienaga

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
Saburo Ienaga, a Japanese historian who devoted his life to battling government censorship of Japan's wartime atrocities in school textbooks, died Sunday, a Japanese news agency reported. He was 89. Ienaga, a professor at Tokyo University of Education, now Tsukuba University, died at a Tokyo hospital, the Kyodo News agency said. The agency did not cite the cause of death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
Saburo Ienaga, a Japanese historian who devoted his life to battling government censorship of Japan's wartime atrocities in school textbooks, died Sunday, a Japanese news agency reported. He was 89. Ienaga, a professor at Tokyo University of Education, now Tsukuba University, died at a Tokyo hospital, the Kyodo News agency said. The agency did not cite the cause of death.
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MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Karl Schoenberger, a former Times Tokyo correspondent, now covers the Asia-Pacific region for the business section
IT IS MORNING RUSH HOUR IN THE LABYRINTHINE CENTRAL concourse of Tokyo Station. Hordes of men and women are hustling--some of them sprinting--to color-coded, numbered stairways, racing to make transfers on the jampacked rail lines that fan out across this megalopolis. They jostle and bump, enrapt in the rhythm of their deployment to offices, shops and factories. Conjure up Grand Central Station to the fifth magnitude but with none of the distemper of the New Yorker.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Karl Schoenberger, a former Times Tokyo correspondent, now covers the Asia-Pacific region for the business section
IT IS MORNING RUSH HOUR IN THE LABYRINTHINE CENTRAL concourse of Tokyo Station. Hordes of men and women are hustling--some of them sprinting--to color-coded, numbered stairways, racing to make transfers on the jampacked rail lines that fan out across this megalopolis. They jostle and bump, enrapt in the rhythm of their deployment to offices, shops and factories. Conjure up Grand Central Station to the fifth magnitude but with none of the distemper of the New Yorker.
NEWS
March 17, 1993 | Reuters
Japan's Supreme Court upheld government censorship of schoolbooks Tuesday, rejecting a landmark lawsuit by a textbook crusader who has waged a 30-year battle against whitewashing of wartime history. The Supreme Court backed a Tokyo High Court decision seven years ago that defended the Education Ministry's constitutional right to dictate the contents of schoolbooks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997
"A country whose textbooks lie . . . will inevitably collapse." Japan's Supreme Court cited that warning from novelist Ryotaro Shiba in ruling that the Education Ministry was wrong in ordering a textbook author to delete accurate descriptions of atrocities committed by Japanese forces during World War II.
OPINION
September 6, 2003
Japanese Defense Minister Shigeru Ishiba traveled to China this week in a high-level response to the recent poisoning of dozens of Chinese by mustard gas left behind by the Japanese army after World War II. How sharply that visit contrasts with Japan's refusal to own up to its germ warfare experiments on Chinese civilians more than half a century ago.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic decision ending an ideologically charged 32-year legal battle, the Japanese Supreme Court on Friday ruled that it was illegal for the government to censor from textbooks unsavory facts about Japan's wartime past.
OPINION
March 18, 2001 | Frank Gibney, Frank Gibney, president of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College and professor of politics, is the author of "Japan: the Fragile Superpower" and other books
If the casual visitor still sees Tokyo as the very image of international prosperity--well-heeled crowds; gleaming skyscrapers; French haute cuisine and American fast-food meccas; Gucci bags; Europe's best orchestras packing concert halls; Mercedes and BMWs alongside Toyotas--forget it. It is the stored-up light of a long fading star. Japan remains caught in the toils of a 10-year-old recession. Its voters are angry but apathetic. Consumers are on strike. Deflation stalks.
NEWS
October 6, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a quavering voice, Yutaka Mio, 83, told a Tokyo courtroom last week of the atrocities he committed as a Japanese military police officer in Manchuria during World War II. "I tortured him by holding a candle flame to his feet, but he didn't say anything," said Mio, after identifying from sepia photographs two Chinese whom he tried to force to confess to being Communist spies in 1941.
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