Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSaccharin
IN THE NEWS

Saccharin

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2000
Re "Saccharin Deleted From U.S. List of Carcinogens," May 16: I wonder why it took our government agencies more than two decades to discover what the rest of us have known since 1900--that normal use of saccharin does not cause cancer. Normal use probably wouldn't even have caused cancer in rats. What a waste of rats. PAUL FARANDA Newport Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Wallykazam!," you might have guessed from the title, is a show for young people. Premiering Monday afternoon on Nickelodeon, it is a preschool, literacy-based cartoon that essentially takes a "Sesame Street" sound-of-this-letter blackout and works it into a 22-minute story. Wally is a 6-year-old troll with a puppyish pet dragon named Norville, evidently a graduate of the Scooby-Doo School of Diction, and a magic stick that can create things out of thin air, but only if they begin with the letter-sound of the day. (It's like a supernatural Enigma machine.)
Advertisement
HEALTH
December 27, 2010
1879 ? Johns Hopkins University chemists Ira Remsen and Constantin Fahlberg publish their first paper describing benzoic sulfimide, which became known as saccharin. 1901 ? Monsanto is founded to produce saccharin in the U.S. 1907 ? An official of the U.S. Department of Agriculture investigates whether using saccharin in place of sugar violates the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act. President Theodore Roosevelt, a saccharin consumer, opposes the investigation. 1909 ? A panel from the USDA's Office of Consulting Scientific Experts reports that saccharin is safe in small doses (less than 1/2 gram per day)
BUSINESS
December 26, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
You'd be hard pressed to find a company that talks more about its "people-centric" management culture than Barry-Wehmiller, a privately owned manufacturer of industrial equipment. Barry-Wehmiller, which has $1.5 billion in annual sales, says it's all about fostering "personal growth" among its 7,000 employees, whom it calls "team members. " Its "Guiding Principles of Leadership" include the imperative to "treat people superbly and compensate them fairly. " (Italics are theirs.)
HEALTH
December 27, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Think saccharin is unsafe? You may want to think again. Saccharin was first identified as a hazardous, potentially cancer-causing chemical by the Food and Drug Administration in the 1970s. But since that time it has slowly been exonerated by state and federal agencies. The FDA changed its position on the chemical in 2001, reclassifying it as OK for consumption, as did the state of California. Now the EPA has announced removal of the sweetener from its list of hazardous chemicals too. Saccharin is one of the best studied artificial sweeteners — after all, it's been around the longest.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2008 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Casting doubt on the benefit of low-calorie sweeteners, research released Sunday reported that rats on diets containing saccharin gained more weight than rats given sugary food. The study in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience found that the calorie-free artificial sweetener appeared to break the physiological connection between sweet tastes and calories, driving the rats to overeat. Lyn M. Steffen, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Minnesota, who was not involved in the latest report, said the study offered a possible explanation for the unexpected association between obesity and diet soda found in recent human studies.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Tami Dennis / Tribune Health
Let's hope that resolution to shed excess pounds doesn't rely too heavily on saccharin-sweetened food. If it does, you might want to rethink your approach to dieting -- but not necessarily because saccharin is going to do you harm. The belief that saccharin is risky has persisted for decades now. That is, it's persisted outside the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, both of which have offered up figurative "to your health" toasts with the stuff.
SCIENCE
November 10, 2007 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Researchers have learned that rats overwhelmingly prefer water sweetened with saccharin to cocaine, a finding that demonstrates the addictive potential of sweets. Offering larger doses of cocaine did not alter the rats' preference for saccharin, according to the report. Scientists said the study, presented this week in San Diego at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, might help explain the rise in human obesity, which has been driven in part by an overconsumption of sugary foods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1994
The Feb. 3 article "No Evidence of 'Sugar High' In Children Found" was at best misleading. Misleading because the experiment was done comparing sugar with aspartame (or Nutrasweet) and saccharin, two additives that have been implicated in children's hyperactivity. Had the sugar been compared with a diet free of artificial additives, a much different picture would have been painted--with vast improvement in the behavior of children on the additive-free diet. The number of children used in this study was pitifully low (25 children ages 3-5, and 23 children ages 6-10)
OPINION
February 16, 2008
Re "Another sour note for dieters," Feb. 11 A study involving rats can hardly provide solid information about the role of noncaloric sweeteners in human regulation of food intake. First, the rat control group was fed glucose, not sucrose, the sugar humans most often use. Second, saccharin is much sweeter than glucose -- which was the comparison sweetener used in the rat study. Thus, simply on the basis of taste preferences, the rats might be expected to consume more saccharin-sweetened foods.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Tami Dennis / Tribune Health
Let's hope that resolution to shed excess pounds doesn't rely too heavily on saccharin-sweetened food. If it does, you might want to rethink your approach to dieting -- but not necessarily because saccharin is going to do you harm. The belief that saccharin is risky has persisted for decades now. That is, it's persisted outside the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, both of which have offered up figurative "to your health" toasts with the stuff.
HEALTH
December 27, 2010
1879 ? Johns Hopkins University chemists Ira Remsen and Constantin Fahlberg publish their first paper describing benzoic sulfimide, which became known as saccharin. 1901 ? Monsanto is founded to produce saccharin in the U.S. 1907 ? An official of the U.S. Department of Agriculture investigates whether using saccharin in place of sugar violates the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act. President Theodore Roosevelt, a saccharin consumer, opposes the investigation. 1909 ? A panel from the USDA's Office of Consulting Scientific Experts reports that saccharin is safe in small doses (less than 1/2 gram per day)
HEALTH
December 27, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Think saccharin is unsafe? You may want to think again. Saccharin was first identified as a hazardous, potentially cancer-causing chemical by the Food and Drug Administration in the 1970s. But since that time it has slowly been exonerated by state and federal agencies. The FDA changed its position on the chemical in 2001, reclassifying it as OK for consumption, as did the state of California. Now the EPA has announced removal of the sweetener from its list of hazardous chemicals too. Saccharin is one of the best studied artificial sweeteners — after all, it's been around the longest.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Letters to Juliet" is an ode to romance of the most starry-eyed sort, a sugary paean to quixotic clichés and a film destined to be a guilty pleasure for some (me included, sigh) and the painful price of a relationship for others (so steel yourselves). The starry eyes here belong to Amanda Seyfried, one of Hollywood's favorite ingénues now. But soon enough the movie morphs into a multigenerational romance-Italian road trip with Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Egan and Franco Nero, to say nothing of certain members of the audience, bitten by the bug. But love doesn't guarantee happy endings, particularly when the tale is tied to Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" and the Verona balcony wherefore the star-crossed lovers he conjured up once cooed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Movie Critic
Is TINA FEY, former head writer for "Saturday Night Live" and creator and star of one of the best shows on television, "30 Rock," going to get hit with a knee-jerk media backlash now? It could happen, given the blood-thirst that motivates so much cultural writing these days and, of course, her "convention-defying" success.
HEALTH
March 17, 2008 | Jill U. Adams, Special to The Times
Artificial sweeteners -- those diet-friendly ways to satisfy the sweet tooth -- recently got some bad press. In a study that has spurred discussion among scientists and on dieting blogs, researchers at Purdue University found that rats consuming saccharin-sweetened yogurt ate more food overall and put on more weight during a two-week period than rats consuming glucose-sweetened yogurt. The rodent finding has led some to ask: Are artificial sweeteners really good for a diet? Or do they, in fact, undermine weight-loss efforts?
HEALTH
March 17, 2008 | Jill U. Adams, Special to The Times
Artificial sweeteners -- those diet-friendly ways to satisfy the sweet tooth -- recently got some bad press. In a study that has spurred discussion among scientists and on dieting blogs, researchers at Purdue University found that rats consuming saccharin-sweetened yogurt ate more food overall and put on more weight during a two-week period than rats consuming glucose-sweetened yogurt. The rodent finding has led some to ask: Are artificial sweeteners really good for a diet? Or do they, in fact, undermine weight-loss efforts?
OPINION
February 16, 2008
Re "Another sour note for dieters," Feb. 11 A study involving rats can hardly provide solid information about the role of noncaloric sweeteners in human regulation of food intake. First, the rat control group was fed glucose, not sucrose, the sugar humans most often use. Second, saccharin is much sweeter than glucose -- which was the comparison sweetener used in the rat study. Thus, simply on the basis of taste preferences, the rats might be expected to consume more saccharin-sweetened foods.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2008 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Casting doubt on the benefit of low-calorie sweeteners, research released Sunday reported that rats on diets containing saccharin gained more weight than rats given sugary food. The study in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience found that the calorie-free artificial sweetener appeared to break the physiological connection between sweet tastes and calories, driving the rats to overeat. Lyn M. Steffen, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Minnesota, who was not involved in the latest report, said the study offered a possible explanation for the unexpected association between obesity and diet soda found in recent human studies.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|