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Sacha Guitry

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most filmmakers who had a hand in shaping the language of the art form approached cinema with the mind-set of pioneers, eager to test and prove the medium's expressive potential. Not so Sacha Guitry. The French actor, writer and director who secured his place in the cinematic pantheon with a series of dazzling comedies made in the 1930s turned to film begrudgingly, spoke of it with condescension and maintained a lifelong allegiance to his first and true love, the theater. Guitry was born and raised in Russia, the son of a stage star who was for a time under contract with a French theater company in St. Petersburg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most filmmakers who had a hand in shaping the language of the art form approached cinema with the mind-set of pioneers, eager to test and prove the medium's expressive potential. Not so Sacha Guitry. The French actor, writer and director who secured his place in the cinematic pantheon with a series of dazzling comedies made in the 1930s turned to film begrudgingly, spoke of it with condescension and maintained a lifelong allegiance to his first and true love, the theater. Guitry was born and raised in Russia, the son of a stage star who was for a time under contract with a French theater company in St. Petersburg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A Sacha Guitry revival is going on, a situation that would surprise no one more than the man himself. Not that the French filmmaker, who wrote, directed and starred in about 30 films between 1935 and 1957, shied away from attention. Far from it. A supreme egotist whose films were finally all about himself and whose acting was once described as "an animated photograph of M. Guitry speaking French," would be shocked that something as pedestrian as a revival would be needed for his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A Sacha Guitry revival is going on, a situation that would surprise no one more than the man himself. Not that the French filmmaker, who wrote, directed and starred in about 30 films between 1935 and 1957, shied away from attention. Far from it. A supreme egotist whose films were finally all about himself and whose acting was once described as "an animated photograph of M. Guitry speaking French," would be shocked that something as pedestrian as a revival would be needed for his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"The Devil's Eye." Embassy. $29.95. Ingmar Bergman regards this 1960 supernatural sex comedy as a failure. His explanation is unsparing: He conceived a jaded, burnt-out Don Juan sent up from hell by an aggravated Satan to seduce a minister's virginal daughter--and the character (as the actor playing him, Jarl Kulle, insisted) was too tired to sustain a film. Perhaps that's true.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1989 | COLMAN ANDREWS
If you're curious about Jacques Maximin's food, but aren't sure you can afford his prices--or keep a straight face through all that curtain-raising business--you might want to try his small, turn-of-the-century-look Bistrot de Nice, immediately next door to the main restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The French Revolution Bicentennial series, running at UCLA's Melnitz Hall, has a truly strange and enjoyable triple feature today. To begin at the bottom: Richard Pottier's 1951 "Caroline Cherie" is a naughty travesty, but an interesting one. Based on the Cecil St. Laurent best seller, and scripted by French playwright Jean Anouilh, it's another of those heavy-breathing tales where a loose heroine in a tight bodice sleeps or flirts her way all...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Beaumarchais, the Scoundrel" is a glorious, giddy account of a tumultuous 11 years--1773 to 1784--in the life of the great French playwright. The author of "The Barber of Seville" and "The Marriage of Figaro" led an incredibly busy life as a political gadfly, taking aim at corruption in the ruling classes, serving as a royal spy, helping underwrite the American Revolution, living by his wits and pursuing beautiful women.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Occasionally, parties drag on far too long, and that's mostly the case with "La Cage aux Folles 3." Once again, we're back at La Cage, the renowned St. Tropez transvestite cabaret, run by suave impresario Renato (Ugo Tognazzi), and headlined by his longtime lover Albin (Michel Serrault). Once again, we're privy to the pair's offstage bickerings, and to Renato's attempts to keep from riling his upright young son's apoplectic father-in-law (Michel Galabru as a kind of French Jerry Falwell).
NEWS
November 2, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WITH the current release of Sofia Coppola's take on "Marie Antoinette," the American Cinematheque at the Aero Theatre is paying tribute to the lavish domicile of the "let them eat cake" French queen with the "Fabulous Versailles" retrospective Friday through Sunday. The event kicks off with the original uncut version of director Sacha Guitry's 1954 extravaganza "Royal Affairs in Versailles."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Monica 4-Plex is following up its splendid Sacha Guitry mini-retrospective with four films of Jacques Tati, another giant of the French cinema whose work is also revived infrequently. "Jour de Fete" (1949), "Mr. Hulot's Holiday" (1953), "Mon Oncle" (1958) and "Playtime" (1968) will screen simultaneously Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. for the next three weekends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Cinema Classics from the Algonquin Roundtable this week adds to its Wednesday 1 p.m. screenings a Tuesday 8 p.m. series, which commences with a Dorothy Parker-Alan Campbell double feature, "A Star Is Born" (1937) and "Sweethearts" (1938). Although not as stunning or subtle as the 1954 George Cukor musical remake, the 1937 William Wellman-directed Technicolor version of "Star" is still potent, myth-making entertainment.
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