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Sacramento Ca Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
August 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a closely watched case, a federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Wednesday that the city of Sacramento can charge commercial builders additional fees to help pay for low-income housing when their developments bring an influx of new workers. The decision provides a green light to a number of other cash-strapped California cities, including Los Angeles, that want to institute similar fees.
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NEWS
June 27, 2000 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The big thinkers here renamed the airport a few years back, scrapping "metropolitan" for a far grander term--"international." The goal was to make Sacramento seem more cosmopolitan, but one county supervisor smelled trouble. It's premature, he warned. People will make fun of us. He was right, because reality has trailed far behind wishful thinking in Sacramento. You can't fly nonstop to Seoul or London or even Mexico City from here. In fact, you can't fly nonstop to New York.
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BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese electronics giant JVC has selected Sacramento as the site for the world's first plant built to produce a next-generation compact disc that could dramatically transform the home consumer electronics industry, according to state officials. The $40-million digital video disc facility is expected to open in 1996 and will initially employ 250, said Julie Wright, secretary of trade and commerce. By 2000, the company plans to expand the project to $400 million and employ 1,000.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Fountain still remembers the smell of tomato soup drifting from the downtown canneries into the lazy streets of this capital city. It was 1976, and the young economist had moved here from West Los Angeles to draw a paycheck from government, like practically every other worker in town. The city was, in every sense, "a plain vanilla government town," Fountain recalls. "It was two years before I saw a Rolls-Royce." Nowadays, Fountain is similarly incredulous.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Fountain still remembers the smell of tomato soup drifting from the downtown canneries into the lazy streets of this capital city. It was 1976, and the young economist had moved here from West Los Angeles to draw a paycheck from government, like practically every other worker in town. The city was, in every sense, "a plain vanilla government town," Fountain recalls. "It was two years before I saw a Rolls-Royce." Nowadays, Fountain is similarly incredulous.
NEWS
October 11, 1998 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, it seemed a powerful magnet was dragging this downtown westward toward the murky waters of the Sacramento River, leaving the Capitol dome on the fringe, its historic park a forgotten backyard. Then the bureaucrats of state government dreamed up what seemed to them a perfect solution: Build a giant office complex on the east side of the park, not only pulling government back toward its nucleus, but gathering together three major state departments now scattered like confetti.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Maguire Thomas Partners Gets $165-Million Contract: The Los Angeles-based developer was chosen by the state to build a 1-million-square-foot headquarters complex for the California Environmental Protection Agency in downtown Sacramento. The building will take up one full block. Los Angeles-based architects A.C. Martin is handling the building's design and Turner Construction, also of Los Angeles, is the general contractor. Construction is to begin next summer and be completed in July, 1996.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most recent major sports franchise to be lured to a new indoor arena in California was the National Basketball Assn.'s Kansas City Kings who moved to Sacramento in 1985. This is all it took for owner Gregg Lukenbill and his partners to pull it off: --They began lobbying city officials in the 1970s for a facility. --They obtained interest in 6,000 acres of agriculturally zoned land on the outskirts of downtown. --They paid $10.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
If the Los Angeles Raiders decide to move to this city, they will play in a stadium to be built on a flood plain that has been described as a "bathtub" by Army Corps of Engineers officials. When a series of severe winter storms lashed the Sacramento area in the winter of 1986, "we came within an eyelash of catastrophe," Walter Yep, planning chief in the corps' Sacramento office, said in an interview last week.
SPORTS
February 25, 1990 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
Although it looks a bit shaky now, if the Raiders finally choose to relocate in these parts, they will be moving into one of the nation's five most historic cities. That's the view, at least, of a prominent local businessman who lists Boston and Washington first, then New York and Philadelphia, with Sacramento next. "The U.S. began in Boston, the West began in Sacramento," Gregg Lukenbill, 35, who built and financed the city's new NBA arena, said at his office the other day.
NEWS
October 11, 1998 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, it seemed a powerful magnet was dragging this downtown westward toward the murky waters of the Sacramento River, leaving the Capitol dome on the fringe, its historic park a forgotten backyard. Then the bureaucrats of state government dreamed up what seemed to them a perfect solution: Build a giant office complex on the east side of the park, not only pulling government back toward its nucleus, but gathering together three major state departments now scattered like confetti.
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking exception to California's stagnated urban construction scene, the blam, blam of the pile driver echoes through downtown Sacramento, pounding merrily along, scarcely missing a beat through good times and recession times. One by one in recent years, construction projects rising in the capital city have added office space equal to the area of about 100 football fields.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese electronics giant JVC has selected Sacramento as the site for the world's first plant built to produce a next-generation compact disc that could dramatically transform the home consumer electronics industry, according to state officials. The $40-million digital video disc facility is expected to open in 1996 and will initially employ 250, said Julie Wright, secretary of trade and commerce. By 2000, the company plans to expand the project to $400 million and employ 1,000.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Maguire Thomas Partners Gets $165-Million Contract: The Los Angeles-based developer was chosen by the state to build a 1-million-square-foot headquarters complex for the California Environmental Protection Agency in downtown Sacramento. The building will take up one full block. Los Angeles-based architects A.C. Martin is handling the building's design and Turner Construction, also of Los Angeles, is the general contractor. Construction is to begin next summer and be completed in July, 1996.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a closely watched case, a federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Wednesday that the city of Sacramento can charge commercial builders additional fees to help pay for low-income housing when their developments bring an influx of new workers. The decision provides a green light to a number of other cash-strapped California cities, including Los Angeles, that want to institute similar fees.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most recent major sports franchise to be lured to a new indoor arena in California was the National Basketball Assn.'s Kansas City Kings who moved to Sacramento in 1985. This is all it took for owner Gregg Lukenbill and his partners to pull it off: --They began lobbying city officials in the 1970s for a facility. --They obtained interest in 6,000 acres of agriculturally zoned land on the outskirts of downtown. --They paid $10.
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking exception to California's stagnated urban construction scene, the blam, blam of the pile driver echoes through downtown Sacramento, pounding merrily along, scarcely missing a beat through good times and recession times. One by one in recent years, construction projects rising in the capital city have added office space equal to the area of about 100 football fields.
SPORTS
February 25, 1990 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
Although it looks a bit shaky now, if the Raiders finally choose to relocate in these parts, they will be moving into one of the nation's five most historic cities. That's the view, at least, of a prominent local businessman who lists Boston and Washington first, then New York and Philadelphia, with Sacramento next. "The U.S. began in Boston, the West began in Sacramento," Gregg Lukenbill, 35, who built and financed the city's new NBA arena, said at his office the other day.
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