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NEWS
November 8, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK and VICTOR ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Francisco's gay community basked Wednesday in its biggest political triumph since the 1970s with enactment of a domestic partners law and the election of two lesbians to the Board of Supervisors and a gay man to the school board. In Oakland, voters elected state Assemblyman Elihu Harris as its new mayor, while Bay Area voters muddied the future of the San Francisco Giants baseball team. And in Riverside, controversial county Coroner Raymond L.
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NEWS
November 8, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK and VICTOR ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Francisco's gay community basked Wednesday in its biggest political triumph since the 1970s with enactment of a domestic partners law and the election of two lesbians to the Board of Supervisors and a gay man to the school board. In Oakland, voters elected state Assemblyman Elihu Harris as its new mayor, while Bay Area voters muddied the future of the San Francisco Giants baseball team. And in Riverside, controversial county Coroner Raymond L.
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NEWS
May 4, 1989
The Rancho Seco nuclear power plant operated at between 54% and 55% of capacity in April for its best monthly performance this year, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District reported. Jim Shetler, assistant general manager of Rancho Seco, said the 913-megawatt plant was at 51% capacity in January, 0% in February and just under 28% in March. Improved operations in April took some of the pressure off the utility, which would have been required to permanently close Rancho Seco if had operated at less than 50% capacity for four consecutive months.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The largest bond issue in Sacramento's history was unanimously approved by the City Council, with about half of the revenue designated to pay the Los Angeles Raiders $50 million if the football team moves to the state capital. Sale of $96.5 million in tax-exempt bonds will be closed on Nov. 28, said City Treasurer Thomas Friery.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Orange County slow-growth proponents conceded defeat Tuesday as their far-reaching measure was being rejected by voters opposed to the idea of linking future growth in unincorporated areas to the ability to provide additional public services to new developments. "There's no question we're going to lose," said a disappointed Tom Rogers, co-founder of the group that sponsored the initiative.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The largest bond issue in Sacramento's history was unanimously approved by the City Council, with about half of the revenue designated to pay the Los Angeles Raiders $50 million if the football team moves to the state capital. Sale of $96.5 million in tax-exempt bonds will be closed on Nov. 28, said City Treasurer Thomas Friery.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Sacramento Municipal Utility District directors have approved a June referendum asking voters to give the troubled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant a 18-month reprieve before deciding whether to abandon it. The referendum plan, ratified 4-1 by the directors Wednesday night, will be the second Rancho Seco-related measure on Sacramento's June 7 ballot. Last year, activists gathered 50,000 signatures to qualify an initiative requiring the erratic plant to close on economic grounds.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
By most measures, Rancho Seco has been one of the nation's least reliable, most troubled nuclear power plants. Problems have closed it down for twice as much time as similar plants and it has delivered but 38% of the power it was designed to generate. However, trouble is not Rancho Seco's only distinction. Because the plant, 25 miles southeast of the state capital, is run by the quasi-governmental Sacramento Municipal Utility District, it can be shut down by a vote of its customers.
NEWS
March 30, 1988
Operators of the long-idled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant were completing last-minute tests, and officials remained hopeful that the plant would be approved for restart late Tuesday night. Kerry Shearer, spokesman for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, owners of the plant, said operators have resolved the latest in a series of equipment malfunctions that delayed restart of the plant three times in the last week. The plant has been closed since a severe over-cooling accident Dec.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Having invested $400 million in refurbishing the aging Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, metropolitan Sacramento voters narrowly rejected a proposal to abandon the plant and decided instead to see exactly what their money bought. By a margin of 50.4% to 49.6%, voters defeated Measure B, which would have closed the troubled but recently refurbished plant. Rather, it will continue to operate for an 18-month trial period, as outlined in rival Measure C, which was favored by 51.
NEWS
May 16, 1989
Two firms involved with creating problem-plagued Rancho Seco have agreed to operate the nuclear power plant jointly with the municipal utility that owns it, officials said. Sacramento Municipal Utility District officials said they would support the proposed 5 1/2-year contract with Bechtel, the plant's architect and engineer, and Babcock & Wilcox, which built the reactor. The agreement, they said, would lead to greater plant efficiency and savings on customers' bills. But opponents maintain that the plant is unsafe and condemned the proposal as a political ploy.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Having invested $400 million in refurbishing the aging Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, metropolitan Sacramento voters narrowly rejected a proposal to abandon the plant and decided instead to see exactly what their money bought. By a margin of 50.4% to 49.6%, voters defeated Measure B, which would have closed the troubled but recently refurbished plant. Rather, it will continue to operate for an 18-month trial period, as outlined in rival Measure C, which was favored by 51.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Orange County slow-growth proponents conceded defeat Tuesday as their far-reaching measure was being rejected by voters opposed to the idea of linking future growth in unincorporated areas to the ability to provide additional public services to new developments. "There's no question we're going to lose," said a disappointed Tom Rogers, co-founder of the group that sponsored the initiative.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
By most measures, Rancho Seco has been one of the nation's least reliable, most troubled nuclear power plants. Problems have closed it down for twice as much time as similar plants and it has delivered but 38% of the power it was designed to generate. However, trouble is not Rancho Seco's only distinction. Because the plant, 25 miles southeast of the state capital, is run by the quasi-governmental Sacramento Municipal Utility District, it can be shut down by a vote of its customers.
NEWS
March 30, 1988
Operators of the long-idled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant were completing last-minute tests, and officials remained hopeful that the plant would be approved for restart late Tuesday night. Kerry Shearer, spokesman for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, owners of the plant, said operators have resolved the latest in a series of equipment malfunctions that delayed restart of the plant three times in the last week. The plant has been closed since a severe over-cooling accident Dec.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Sacramento Municipal Utility District directors have approved a June referendum asking voters to give the troubled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant a 18-month reprieve before deciding whether to abandon it. The referendum plan, ratified 4-1 by the directors Wednesday night, will be the second Rancho Seco-related measure on Sacramento's June 7 ballot. Last year, activists gathered 50,000 signatures to qualify an initiative requiring the erratic plant to close on economic grounds.
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