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NEWS
February 16, 1990 | KENNETH REICH and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly three years of skillfully soliciting ever more lucrative offers from various cities desiring to be the home of his football team, Los Angeles Raiders owner Al Davis may soon find himself at last constrained to show his hand more openly. If he doesn't give some public indication of his direction, the balloon of expanding offers could burst, and he could find himself with less-attractive options.
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NEWS
January 23, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
Show me the money! --Pro football receiver Rod Tidwell in the movie "Jerry Maguire." **** Los Angeles developer Jim Thomas, who five years ago bought the Sacramento Kings pro basketball team, is telling local politicians to show him the money or he's out of here with his millionaire players. Never mind that the last 475 home games have been sold out. The average ticket price for this subaverage NBA team is $32, plus $6 for parking, and the arena holds 17,317.
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NEWS
March 15, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most recent major sports franchise to be lured to a new indoor arena in California was the National Basketball Assn.'s Kansas City Kings who moved to Sacramento in 1985. This is all it took for owner Gregg Lukenbill and his partners to pull it off: --They began lobbying city officials in the 1970s for a facility. --They obtained interest in 6,000 acres of agriculturally zoned land on the outskirts of downtown. --They paid $10.
NEWS
February 24, 1988
Operators of the troubled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant have been advised by an analyst to permanently close the plant rather than continue costly efforts to restart it after a two-year shutdown. "Our analysis shows closing the plant would save $200 million to $1 billion over the next 12 years," energy policy analyst Joseph Kriesberg told the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Board of Directors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
"It's ours to lose," developer and promoter Gregg Lukenbill said Friday in describing this city's chances of luring the Los Angeles Raiders to a new stadium Lukenbill and his partners want to build on a flood plain north of downtown.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The largest bond issue in Sacramento's history was unanimously approved by the City Council, with about half of the revenue designated to pay the Los Angeles Raiders $50 million if the football team moves to the state capital. Sale of $96.5 million in tax-exempt bonds will be closed on Nov. 28, said City Treasurer Thomas Friery.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
Show me the money! --Pro football receiver Rod Tidwell in the movie "Jerry Maguire." **** Los Angeles developer Jim Thomas, who five years ago bought the Sacramento Kings pro basketball team, is telling local politicians to show him the money or he's out of here with his millionaire players. Never mind that the last 475 home games have been sold out. The average ticket price for this subaverage NBA team is $32, plus $6 for parking, and the arena holds 17,317.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most recent major sports franchise to be lured to a new indoor arena in California was the National Basketball Assn.'s Kansas City Kings who moved to Sacramento in 1985. This is all it took for owner Gregg Lukenbill and his partners to pull it off: --They began lobbying city officials in the 1970s for a facility. --They obtained interest in 6,000 acres of agriculturally zoned land on the outskirts of downtown. --They paid $10.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | KENNETH REICH and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly three years of skillfully soliciting ever more lucrative offers from various cities desiring to be the home of his football team, Los Angeles Raiders owner Al Davis may soon find himself at last constrained to show his hand more openly. If he doesn't give some public indication of his direction, the balloon of expanding offers could burst, and he could find himself with less-attractive options.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The largest bond issue in Sacramento's history was unanimously approved by the City Council, with about half of the revenue designated to pay the Los Angeles Raiders $50 million if the football team moves to the state capital. Sale of $96.5 million in tax-exempt bonds will be closed on Nov. 28, said City Treasurer Thomas Friery.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
If the Los Angeles Raiders decide to move to this city, they will play in a stadium to be built on a flood plain that has been described as a "bathtub" by Army Corps of Engineers officials. When a series of severe winter storms lashed the Sacramento area in the winter of 1986, "we came within an eyelash of catastrophe," Walter Yep, planning chief in the corps' Sacramento office, said in an interview last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
"It's ours to lose," developer and promoter Gregg Lukenbill said Friday in describing this city's chances of luring the Los Angeles Raiders to a new stadium Lukenbill and his partners want to build on a flood plain north of downtown.
NEWS
February 24, 1988
Operators of the troubled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant have been advised by an analyst to permanently close the plant rather than continue costly efforts to restart it after a two-year shutdown. "Our analysis shows closing the plant would save $200 million to $1 billion over the next 12 years," energy policy analyst Joseph Kriesberg told the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Board of Directors.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
If the Los Angeles Raiders decide to move to this city, they will play in a stadium to be built on a flood plain that has been described as a "bathtub" by Army Corps of Engineers officials. When a series of severe winter storms lashed the Sacramento area in the winter of 1986, "we came within an eyelash of catastrophe," Walter Yep, planning chief in the corps' Sacramento office, said in an interview last week.
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