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NEWS
January 21, 1987 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Teachers in the Sacramento Unified School District, the state's seventh largest, went on strike Tuesday, primarily in protest over the issue of pay. A union official said 83% of the district's 2,300 full-time teachers manned picket lines at the start of school Tuesday and are determined to resume the protest today.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001
A judge has ruled against Sacramento teachers who challenged the rules for Gov. Gray Davis' most lucrative rewards program for test-score improvements. The lawsuit led the state to hold up the rewards, which range from $5,000 to $25,000 per teacher for the $100-million staff performance incentive program. Superior Court Judge Gail Ohanesian gave the teachers time to appeal, so the money cannot be distributed for the next 60 days.
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NEWS
September 8, 1989
Thousands of students in Sacramento stayed away from classrooms on the third day of a teachers strike, while Teamsters truck drivers were notified that they could honor picket lines and halt deliveries to schools. Negotiators met all day Wednesday and into early Thursday, but failed to reach an agreement that would end the nation's largest teachers' strike. Union leaders said about 1,800 teachers, counselors, speech therapists and nurses remained away from their jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teachers throughout California will begin paying visits to their students' homes next fall through a new program designed to strengthen ties with parents and improve academic achievement. Four hundred schools will be awarded state grants of up to $40,000 each so their teachers can make the visits during evenings and on weekends. The schools will be selected next month from a pool of more than 2,500 campuses that have applied for the funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000 | VIRGINIA RILEY, Editor's note: The writer is an 83-year-old grandmother who is serving her second year as a volunteer elementary school classroom aide. At the invitation of the Reading Page, she has written a layperson's view of the struggles students face today as they learn to read in the public schools. Other viewpoints are welcome
I am a volunteer soldier in the war for literacy. When I heard reports that many of our children lacked the ability to read, I gladly enlisted to be a classroom teacher's aide. Currently, I work six hours a week in first- and third-grade classrooms at Bear Flag Elementary School, which is in the Sacramento City Unified School District. What I've seen really worries me. Students are being forced to struggle with high-minded reading texts that have little to do with their daily lives.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first working day as governor, Pete Wilson visited a local elementary school Tuesday and was promptly introduced to one of California's major educational problems: Rapidly increasing numbers of non-English-speaking students who need more help than the state and federal governments have been able to provide.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A school board is restricting student access to Sports Illustrated's 1989 swimsuit issue after concluding that it may not be in a youngster's best interests. Trustees of San Juan Unified School District voted 4 to 1 to place the bathing beauty issue on reserve--and behind the counter--in school libraries. Students who want to see it must sign a formal request and parents can ask that their children not be allowed to do so, the board said.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
A week after school started, striking Sacramento City Unified School District teachers ended their walkout Tuesday and returned to their classrooms. Negotiators for the district and teachers' union reached a tentative agreement after 1 1/2 days of round-the-clock talks. "The strike has been called off. . . . Everybody's back to work," said Paula Caplinger, a music teacher and organizer for the Sacramento City Teachers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teachers throughout California will begin paying visits to their students' homes next fall through a new program designed to strengthen ties with parents and improve academic achievement. Four hundred schools will be awarded state grants of up to $40,000 each so their teachers can make the visits during evenings and on weekends. The schools will be selected next month from a pool of more than 2,500 campuses that have applied for the funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001
A judge has ruled against Sacramento teachers who challenged the rules for Gov. Gray Davis' most lucrative rewards program for test-score improvements. The lawsuit led the state to hold up the rewards, which range from $5,000 to $25,000 per teacher for the $100-million staff performance incentive program. Superior Court Judge Gail Ohanesian gave the teachers time to appeal, so the money cannot be distributed for the next 60 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000 | VIRGINIA RILEY, Editor's note: The writer is an 83-year-old grandmother who is serving her second year as a volunteer elementary school classroom aide. At the invitation of the Reading Page, she has written a layperson's view of the struggles students face today as they learn to read in the public schools. Other viewpoints are welcome
I am a volunteer soldier in the war for literacy. When I heard reports that many of our children lacked the ability to read, I gladly enlisted to be a classroom teacher's aide. Currently, I work six hours a week in first- and third-grade classrooms at Bear Flag Elementary School, which is in the Sacramento City Unified School District. What I've seen really worries me. Students are being forced to struggle with high-minded reading texts that have little to do with their daily lives.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An award-winning teacher banned from the classroom after revealing plans to undergo a sex change operation has resigned in exchange for a $150,000 settlement, officials at a suburban school district here announced Monday. David Warfield, a teacher at Center High School since 1990, revealed in May that he intended to become Dana Rivers. But the 44-year-old teacher never returned to school this year because trustees voted in August to fire Rivers for discussing the sex change with students.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charlotte McCormick's eighth-graders crack open their English books and once again prepare to study . . . the alphabet. On this morning the 13- and 14-year-olds are tackling vowels with the aid of flashcards and word games. "Say 'quick,' " McCormick tells the students. "Now change the middle sound to A." "Quack," they respond. The exercise seems absurd in a classroom of teenagers preparing to enter high school.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first working day as governor, Pete Wilson visited a local elementary school Tuesday and was promptly introduced to one of California's major educational problems: Rapidly increasing numbers of non-English-speaking students who need more help than the state and federal governments have been able to provide.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A school board is restricting student access to Sports Illustrated's 1989 swimsuit issue after concluding that it may not be in a youngster's best interests. Trustees of San Juan Unified School District voted 4 to 1 to place the bathing beauty issue on reserve--and behind the counter--in school libraries. Students who want to see it must sign a formal request and parents can ask that their children not be allowed to do so, the board said.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
A week after school started, striking Sacramento City Unified School District teachers ended their walkout Tuesday and returned to their classrooms. Negotiators for the district and teachers' union reached a tentative agreement after 1 1/2 days of round-the-clock talks. "The strike has been called off. . . . Everybody's back to work," said Paula Caplinger, a music teacher and organizer for the Sacramento City Teachers Assn.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | From Times Wires Services
Thousands of students stayed away from Sacramento schools Wednesday as a walkout by teachers, counselors and nurses entered its second day. Meanwhile, San Jose's 29,000 students attended their second day of school in classrooms staffed by teachers who came very close to striking but at the last minute accepted a tentative contract offer. In San Diego, teachers prepared to go back to school next week with a 6.4% pay hike approved by school trustees Tuesday.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Striking Sacramento teachers rallied at the state Capitol on Friday as talks broke down with no date for resumption. More than 1,200 of the Sacramento City Unified School District's 2,000 teachers remained off their jobs for the fourth day Friday. Negotiations broke off at 12:30 a.m. Friday. Paula Caplinger, spokeswoman for the Sacramento City Teachers Assn., said the district walked out of the meeting.
NEWS
September 8, 1989
Thousands of students in Sacramento stayed away from classrooms on the third day of a teachers strike, while Teamsters truck drivers were notified that they could honor picket lines and halt deliveries to schools. Negotiators met all day Wednesday and into early Thursday, but failed to reach an agreement that would end the nation's largest teachers' strike. Union leaders said about 1,800 teachers, counselors, speech therapists and nurses remained away from their jobs.
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