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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995 | SANDRA ANN HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its 72 years, the tiny community of Isleton has called itself "The Little Paris of the Delta," "The Asparagus Capital of the World" and "Crawdad Town U.S.A." Now, a grand jury wants Isleton to call it a day. The Sacramento County grand jury has determined that the town is unable to govern itself and has proposed that it cease to be--that it close down the government, disincorporate and allow the county to swallow it whole.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995 | SANDRA ANN HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its 72 years, the tiny community of Isleton has called itself "The Little Paris of the Delta," "The Asparagus Capital of the World" and "Crawdad Town U.S.A." Now, a grand jury wants Isleton to call it a day. The Sacramento County grand jury has determined that the town is unable to govern itself and has proposed that it cease to be--that it close down the government, disincorporate and allow the county to swallow it whole.
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NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Superior Court judge today ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary examination before trial. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" of a judge's dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989
A Superior Court judge in Sacramento on Thursday refused to dismiss charges against Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange, who is accused of forging former President Reagan's name on campaign-endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis' attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said he will appeal the decision of Superior Court Judge James I. Morris to the 3rd District Court of Appeal. Blackmon had asked Morris to dismiss the charges on grounds that the phony endorsement letters could not constitute forgery under California law because there was no intent to defraud anyone of money or property.
NEWS
May 11, 1989
A Sacramento Superior Court judge ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary hearing before trial. Lewis' lawyer, Clyde M. Blackmon, and the deputy attorney general prosecuting the case had tentatively agreed to start the trial Sept.
NEWS
May 2, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Assemblyman John R. Lewis (R-Orange) pleaded not guilty today to a single felony charge of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign letters mailed to thousands of California voters in 1986. Lewis' plea, in proceedings that took less than a minute, came after nearly three months of legal maneuvering by his lawyers, who had won repeated postponement of the assemblyman's arraignment as they sought to have the grand jury indictment against him dismissed. Although those attempts continue, Sacramento County Superior Court Judge James Morris ordered Lewis to appear today to enter his plea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989
A Superior Court judge in Sacramento on Thursday refused to dismiss charges against Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange, who is accused of forging former President Reagan's name on campaign-endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis' attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said he will appeal the decision of Superior Court Judge James I. Morris to the 3rd District Court of Appeal. Blackmon had asked Morris to dismiss the charges on grounds that the phony endorsement letters could not constitute forgery under California law because there was no intent to defraud anyone of money or property.
NEWS
May 10, 1989
A Superior Court judge today ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary examination before trial. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" of a judge's dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge Wednesday ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary hearing before trial. He has pleaded not guilty. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" for a judge dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Assemblyman John R. Lewis (R-Orange) pleaded not guilty Tuesday to a single felony charge of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign letters mailed to thousands of California voters in 1986. Lewis' plea, in proceedings that took less than a minute, came after nearly three months of legal maneuvering by his lawyers, who had won several postponements of the arraignment while they sought dismissal of the grand jury indictment against him. Although those attempts continue, Sacramento County Superior Court Judge James I. Morris ordered Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, to appear Tuesday morning to enter his plea.
NEWS
May 11, 1989
A Sacramento Superior Court judge ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary hearing before trial. Lewis' lawyer, Clyde M. Blackmon, and the deputy attorney general prosecuting the case had tentatively agreed to start the trial Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge Wednesday ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary hearing before trial. He has pleaded not guilty. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" for a judge dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Superior Court judge today ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary examination before trial. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" of a judge's dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
NEWS
May 10, 1989
A Superior Court judge today ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary examination before trial. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" of a judge's dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Assemblyman John R. Lewis (R-Orange) pleaded not guilty Tuesday to a single felony charge of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign letters mailed to thousands of California voters in 1986. Lewis' plea, in proceedings that took less than a minute, came after nearly three months of legal maneuvering by his lawyers, who had won several postponements of the arraignment while they sought dismissal of the grand jury indictment against him. Although those attempts continue, Sacramento County Superior Court Judge James I. Morris ordered Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, to appear Tuesday morning to enter his plea.
NEWS
May 2, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Assemblyman John R. Lewis (R-Orange) pleaded not guilty today to a single felony charge of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign letters mailed to thousands of California voters in 1986. Lewis' plea, in proceedings that took less than a minute, came after nearly three months of legal maneuvering by his lawyers, who had won repeated postponement of the assemblyman's arraignment as they sought to have the grand jury indictment against him dismissed. Although those attempts continue, Sacramento County Superior Court Judge James Morris ordered Lewis to appear today to enter his plea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
State Controller Kathleen Connell launched audits Thursday of the finances of Los Angeles and Sacramento counties' child welfare agencies. The audits will trace the hundreds of millions of dollars in foster care funds spent by Los Angeles' Department of Children and Family Services and its smaller counterpart in Sacramento. A spate of child deaths in Los Angeles and a critical report by the Sacramento County Grand Jury helped spark the probe, said staffers in Connell's office.
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