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Sacramento Municipal Utility District

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NEWS
June 22, 1989
The utility that operates the Rancho Seco nuclear plant is taking bids for a takeover of the power station that voters decided to close. The decision by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District to take bids angered many of the activists who have fought for years to shut down the plant, which has a history of operating problems. The board majority argued that the ballot measure in which the electorate decided to close the plant does not forbid someone else from running it. The sale of Rancho Seco would save the community the $200-million to $300-million cost of shutting it down, said Joseph Buonaiuto, board president.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The state's energy crisis of 2000-01 may be over, but lingering consumer frustration has contributed to a push by several cities in one Northern California county to abandon investor-owned Pacific Gas & Electric Co. California's failed experiment with energy deregulation, marked by blackouts and soaring utility rates, led PG&E and other utility giants to rack up billions of dollars in debt. Municipally owned utilities emerged relatively unscathed.
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NEWS
December 25, 1988
Duke Power Co. of North Carolina has suspended its bid to manage the troubled Rancho Seco nuclear generating plant south of Sacramento. The board of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, the plant's owner and operator, failed to accept a proposal for the Charlotte-based company to manage the California plant. If Duke had taken over the plant, it would have marked the first time a utility in one state took over management of another utility's nuclear plant in another state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Sacramento Municipal Utility District plans to install 15 new wind turbines to boost its energy output, officials said. The additions are part of an expansion of the utility's power plant in the Montezuma Hills area west of Rio Vista. Officials said the new turbines will produce three times more electricity than the eight older turbines.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A petition drive to abolish the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and sell the citizen-owned electric power firm to private investors has been launched in the state capital. Critics are seeking signatures of 27,400 registered voters in SMUD's service district to put the question on the November ballot. Voters in the district, covering all of Sacramento County and a part of Placer County, voted last year to close the utility's Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, after years of controversy.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what its backers called a breakthrough in efforts to make electric cars practical and affordable, a Sacramento utility Thursday unveiled the first working model of a battery that stores energy in a high-tech flywheel. The device, which stores energy mechanically, uses the same principle that keeps a yo-yo or potter's wheel spinning. It was designed by American Flywheel Systems Inc., a small Bellevue, Wash., company, and built by Honeywell Inc.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1992 | DANIEL AKST
People thought S. David Freeman was crazy. When he arrived in Sacramento to look for housing, a prospective neighbor hissed at him. When he stopped 10 people on the street and asked their opinion, eight said they hated his employer. A ninth described the organization as "a bunch of crooks." Freeman has a lot more friends now.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A petition drive to abolish the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and sell the citizen-owned electric power firm to private investors has been launched in the state capital. Critics are seeking signatures of 27,400 registered voters in SMUD's service district to put the question on the November ballot. Voters in the district, covering all of Sacramento County and a part of Placer County, voted last year to close the utility's Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, after years of controversy.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
The president of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District board suggested that the utility should seek a "friendly takeover" by Pacific Gas & Electric. Joseph Buonaiuto said SMUD is hopelessly in debt and will remain so in the future because voters in June voted to close the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. Any takeover would have to be approved by the district's voters. Buonaiuto said that since voters closed the nuclear plant, the utility has had to buy power from other agencies.
NEWS
August 28, 1989
Directors of Sacramento's citizen-owned utility district voted to slow the dismantling of the Rancho Seco nuclear power facility while they study offers by private investors to operate it. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District board closed the plant June 7, one day after voters ordered the utility to cease operating the 15-year-old facility.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Three weeks after voters closed the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, five bidders stepped up Friday with offers to buy the plant and run it independently. Only one bidder--Quadrex Inc., a Campbell, Calif., nuclear engineering consulting firm--offered to reopen the facility as a nuclear plant. The others would repower it with fossil fuels--either natural gas or "clean-burning, coal-derived alternative fuels."
NEWS
June 22, 1989
The utility that operates the Rancho Seco nuclear plant is taking bids for a takeover of the power station that voters decided to close. The decision by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District to take bids angered many of the activists who have fought for years to shut down the plant, which has a history of operating problems. The board majority argued that the ballot measure in which the electorate decided to close the plant does not forbid someone else from running it. The sale of Rancho Seco would save the community the $200-million to $300-million cost of shutting it down, said Joseph Buonaiuto, board president.
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