Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSacramento River
IN THE NEWS

Sacramento River

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A construction worker died Monday when an excavator he was driving onto a barge slipped off and fell into the Sacramento River, state officials said. The Sacramento Bee identified the man as 49-year-old Richard Wayne Alexander of Pittsburg. Alexander died after 1:30 p.m. when the excavator he was driving fell into about 15 feet of water, said Cal/OSHA spokesman Greg Siggins. The agency, which investigates possible workplace safety violations, will issue the findings of its review into the incident by April, he added.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A decision by a federal appeals court Wednesday could allow for changes in water deliveries to irrigation districts that hold senior rights to Sacramento River supplies. The unanimous opinion by an 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned two previous rulings that found the federal government lacked discretion to alter water contracts with senior irrigators in the Sacramento Valley. The new decision sends the matter back to a district court for further consideration, leaving both sides in the nearly decade-old case unsure of the ultimate outcome.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A decision by a federal appeals court Wednesday could allow for changes in water deliveries to irrigation districts that hold senior rights to Sacramento River supplies. The unanimous opinion by an 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned two previous rulings that found the federal government lacked discretion to alter water contracts with senior irrigators in the Sacramento Valley. The new decision sends the matter back to a district court for further consideration, leaving both sides in the nearly decade-old case unsure of the ultimate outcome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
HAMILTON CITY, Calif. - A shallow inland sea spreads across more than 160 square miles, speckled with egrets poking for crayfish among jewel-green rice shoots. The flooded fields could be mistaken for the rice paddies of Vietnam or southern China, but this is Northern California at the onset of severe drought. The scene is a testament to the inequities of California's system of water rights, a hierarchy of haves as old as the state. PHOTOS: The water diversion debate Thanks to seniority, powerful Central Valley irrigation districts that most Californians have never heard of are at the head of the line for vast amounts of water, even at the expense of the environment and the rest of the state.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
The state Department of Fish and Game does not intend to stock the upper reaches of the Sacramento River near Dunsmuir with hatchery-raised trout, officials said Friday. But the department will repopulate a 40-mile stretch of the river with wild rainbow trout in an attempt to restore fish life to the area contaminated by a chemical spill from last summer's train derailment. Under the plan, employees will capture 50 pairs of adult rainbow trout from an unaffected area of the river above Dunsmuir.
TRAVEL
July 25, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
To many motorists, Interstate 5 north of Sacramento seems to go on forever. Fortunately, relief from California's "ag country" autobahn is possible at two state recreation areas on the banks of the Sacramento River. These small parks--Colusa-Sacramento River and Woodson Bridge--offer an opportunity to tube or swim the river, and to get an up-close look at both the natural and cultivated sides of the great Sacramento Valley.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A derailed Southern Pacific tanker car spilled as much as 19,000 gallons of a toxic pesticide into the Sacramento River 50 miles north of Redding, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of residents, killing tens of thousands of fish and devastating the ecosystem along a 40-mile stretch of the waterway, officials said Monday.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | United Press International
pite mid-January storms, there is only a 10% chance of a normal runoff of water into the Northern California dams that supply much of the state during drought, the Department of Water Resources said in its latest forecast of runoff in the Sacramento River watershed. Most of California's reserve water supply is stored in three large dams on the Sacramento and its tributaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire reports
Workers say they have nearly finished cleaning up a toxic chemical that spilled into the Upper Sacramento River in a train derailment, killing plant and animal life as it flowed into Shasta Lake. "I would say that the first stage will be over soon," said Dennis Wilson of the state Regional Water Quality Control Board. "Now what we're looking at is restoration . . . of the river. We're away from the toxics problem and into the biological problem of how to restore the ecosystem."
TRAVEL
June 2, 2002 | Jane Engle
Turtle Bay Museum opens this week as the focal point of a 300-acre park being developed along the Sacramento River in the heart of Redding in Northern California. The museum presents the art, history and natural environment of the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Don't blame the little fish. And don't call it the Central Valley. Both comments, repeated incessantly, were irritants during President Obama's visit to parched California farm country last week. The president was there - in the San Joaquin Valley - to cuddle with water hogs. The hogs are large growers who use lots of water, have just about run out and are angry because they're being denied other people's. And they keep complaining that the government is favoring a little "bait fish" over farmers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - So it's official: We are in a serious drought. That means this: Next comes serious flooding. But we'll still be in a declared drought. That's just the nature of California weather patterns - and water politics. A drought proclamation, as issued by Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday, changes the political climate. It focuses public attention on the need for costly new waterworks. Therefore governors and water officials are always reluctant to declare a drought over, even when rivers again leap their banks, fill reservoirs and send torrents of muddy snowmelt, uprooted trees and drowned livestock cascading into the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
The Sacramento City Council on Tuesday ordered those who live and work in the city to reduce their water use amid historically low water levels on the American River and a discouraging forecast. Described as a "Stage 2 water shortage plan," the new rules require those who live and work in the city to reduce the water use by 20% to 30%, the Sacramento Bee reported . The move came one day after Gov. Jerry Brown  told reporters in Fresno on Monday that his administration would soon declare that California is officially in the midst of a drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Jason Wells
What was supposed to be a day of closure for Melvin Hayes turned out to be another chapter of grief Thursday when his car was stolen at an Elk Grove carwash -- with his wife's ashes still in the backseat. Hayes, 80, is now more concerned about getting his wife's ashes back than he is the red 2011 Ford Fusion. “Someone could dump my wife's ashes in the Sacramento River, or dumpster, or down the sewer,” he told CBS Sacramento . “I don't want that to happen to my wife's ashes.” Hayes and his wife, Annamarie, would have celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary in January.
FOOD
November 30, 2013 | By Thomas Keller
Holiday meals tend to pass by in a blur of turkeys, hams, roast beef and sweet potatoes. How do you break through that to make an impression on your guests? Caviar is one sure cure. And it's one that can be delivered on a range of budgets. Though caviar is synonymous with luxury, opulence and indulgence, if you know what you're doing it can still be served at a relatively modest price and still deliver the goods. There is a wide range of caviar products, and the trick is knowing which ones are best used in which situation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A construction worker died Monday when an excavator he was driving onto a barge slipped off and fell into the Sacramento River, state officials said. The Sacramento Bee identified the man as 49-year-old Richard Wayne Alexander of Pittsburg. Alexander died after 1:30 p.m. when the excavator he was driving fell into about 15 feet of water, said Cal/OSHA spokesman Greg Siggins. The agency, which investigates possible workplace safety violations, will issue the findings of its review into the incident by April, he added.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
In California's worst river disaster ever, the fishery in a 40-mile stretch of the upper Sacramento River to Lake Shasta was wiped out after a derailed tanker car spilled thousands of gallons of metam-sodium--a toxic weed-killer--last weekend. Experts predict it will take 10 years for the upper Sacramento River to completely recover from the catastrophe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
SUTTER ISLAND, Calif. - As a child, Brett Baker learned farming fundamentals from his grandfather, who taught him to drive a tractor and gave him some advice about water. "There may come a time," his grandfather said, "when you have to grab a shotgun and sit on the pump. " The vast delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers east of San Francisco, where Baker's family has lived and farmed since the 1850s, has long been the center of the state's chronic water conflicts. It is the switchyard of California water, the place where the north's liquid riches are shipped to the irrigation ditches of the San Joaquin Valley and the sinks of Southland suburbs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Two men were found dead this week on a houseboat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, authorities said. Police in Solano County got a call Monday afternoon from Contra Costa authorities who had spotted the houseboat in the deep water channel of the Sacramento River, according to the Sacramento Bee. "They attempted to call the people on the houseboat but got no response," said Daryl Snedecker of the Solano County Sheriff's Office. When authorities boarded the vessel, they found the bodies, he added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - The Brown administration and some water buffaloes want to muck up one of the most unique, mysterious and picturesque areas of California. Muck it up literally. OK, they're really trying to update California's vital waterworks and prepare the state for the future. But their solution would defile a bucolic region whose feel and lifestyle have changed little for more than a century. You just don't find many such places any more, at least near large metropolitan centers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|