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NEWS
August 14, 1989
An exotic water weed called hydrilla is threatening the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta waterway, worried officials said. Madera County Agricultural Commissioner Don Cripes said hydrilla has clogged inland water passages in the east and south since it was discovered in Florida in the early 1960s. And now it has been found in Eastman Lake and the Chowchilla Rivers, near Raymond in Madera County, southwest of Yosemite.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
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NEWS
November 16, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
For Bill Leisic, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a sort of Huck Finn country where he can drop a line into his favorite fishing hole and hook his limit of bass. To officials in charge of moving water to Central Valley farmers and millions of people in Southern California, it is the state's most important spigot. Without its fresh water, much of the state would go thirsty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Forget farmers vs. fishermen - or south state vs. north state. California's current water war is being waged most intensely by farmers against fellow farmers. It's a Central Valley civil war. And within that vast food-producing region - Bakersfield to Redding - it's the San Joaquin Valley vs. the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Southern California is a paying participant, siding with the San Joaquin, but in a less combative role. Its goal is to ensure a more reliable flow of delta water over the Tehachapi.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No concoction of nature, with the possible exception of the foreboding San Andreas Fault, is as intertwined in the daily lives of Californians as these 700 miles of meandering rivers and overgrown sloughs. Through a tangle of levees and canals, beneath drawbridges and around farm islands sprinkled white with pear blossoms, flows the drinking water for 20 million people, saved from the salty fingers of the sea by an engineering feat of pumps and giant pipes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A drilling rig bit into the bed of California's biggest river, hauling up sage-green tubes of clay and sand the consistency of uncooked fudge. The rig workers rolled the muck into strips, dried it in sugar-sized cubes and crushed them under their palms. They packed slices into carefully labeled canning jars for testing at an engineering lab. They were taking the river bottom samples for a $13-billion project that would shunt water around ? or under ? the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to the big aqueducts that ferry supplies south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
A National Academy of Sciences panel has concluded that the much-disputed fish protections that have curbed water deliveries to the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California are scientifically justified. The findings, contained in a report that will be released Friday, largely validate environmental actions taken by two federal agencies to save the imperiled delta smelt and protect declining populations of salmon that migrate through the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta. The protections, imposed under the federal Endangered Species Act, have recently grown stricter, compounding water shortages stemming from the state's three-year drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2004 | William Wan, Times Staff Writer
A levee break that flooded an island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta was declared a federal disaster Thursday by President Bush, qualifying the state and local governments for millions of dollars in federal aid. The breach last month ruined farmers' homes, killed animals and left 12,000 acres of crops under water.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of smooth sailing, the ambitious state and federal effort to save the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the aquatic lifeblood of the California economy, is facing serious legal and political problems. In the last week, lawsuits were filed against the so-called CalFed program by the Municipal Water District of Orange County, the California Farm Bureau Federation and a coalition of rural counties in Northern California.
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's decision last week to drop his proposed temporary protections for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta provides a startling reminder of how politically volatile--and perhaps insoluble--California's complex water problems remain. Wilson is the fourth consecutive governor to talk, in varying degrees, about addressing the state's water quandary--and the fourth in 25 years to throw up his arms in despair. Not since former Gov. Edmund G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
If a product doesn't sell, try repackaging and renaming. That's a proven strategy, whatever you're peddling. Good timing also helps. Thus, when the governor's California Water Action Plan sits on a shelf unnoticed for a while - and outside it is very dry - reshape and rewrap the contents as Emergency Drought Legislation. Bingo. There's a buying frenzy. Gov. Jerry Brown and his administration spent months, behind the scenes, crafting his Water Action Plan. On Jan. 10, he devoted significant space in his annual budget proposal to the $619-million plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders unveiled a proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package Wednesday to free up water supplies and aid Californians facing financial ruin because of the state's prolonged dry spell. The proposal would provide millions of dollars to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. It would increase penalties for those who illegally divert water. The plan also contains money for emergency food and housing for those out of work because of the drought, including farmworkers, and to provide emergency drinking water to communities in need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- A proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package was unveiled Wednesday to free up water supplies and aid Californians facing financial ruin. The proposal presented by Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders would provide millions of dollars to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. "We really don't know how bad the drought is going to be," Brown said to reporters at the state's emergency operations center. The plan contains money for emergency food and housing for those out of work because of the drought, including farmworkers, and to provide emergency drinking water to communities in need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Two men were found dead this week on a houseboat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, authorities said. Police in Solano County got a call Monday afternoon from Contra Costa authorities who had spotted the houseboat in the deep water channel of the Sacramento River, according to the Sacramento Bee. "They attempted to call the people on the houseboat but got no response," said Daryl Snedecker of the Solano County Sheriff's Office. When authoritiesĀ boarded the vessel, they found the bodies, he added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Of the many issues hanging over the proposal to burrow enormous tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and replumb the hub of California's water system, the one most likely to make or break the $25-billion project is money. Just who, exactly, is going to pay for it? The San Joaquin Valley irrigation districts and urban water agencies in Southern California and the San Francisco Bay Area that get water supplies from the delta have promised to pick up most of the tab, with federal and state taxpayers paying the rest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Federal agencies reviewing draft environmental documents for the state's proposal to re-plumb the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta are criticizing the work as "insufficient," "biased" and "confusing. " The federal comments suggest it's going to be tough for the state to meet its self-imposed deadline of releasing the draft this October for official public comment, an important step in moving the project forward. In what would be the biggest water supply project constructed in California in half a century, the state is proposing to build a large diversion point on the Sacramento River in the north delta and send the water through two 35-mile tunnels to aqueducts serving the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
The state plan to overhaul the hub of California's water system will cost nearly $25 billion to build and operate, according to preliminary figures released Wednesday. The proposal, backed by Gov. Jerry Brown's administration and the Obama administration, calls for habitat restoration and the construction of two enormous tunnels to divert water from the Sacramento River and carry it under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to southbound pumps. Water users, including San Joaquin Valley irrigation districts and urban agencies in Southern California and the Bay Area, would bear roughly two-thirds of the cost, with the rest coming from federal and state sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
One thing stood out in the pile of documents released Thursday detailing state plans to replumb California's water hub: Construction could start on the massive project before water managers know whether it will work as intended. The still-evolving proposal, backed by Gov. Jerry Brown's administration and the federal government, is designed to partially restore the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta environment and halt reductions in delta water exports. But uncertainty over the volume of future water deliveries is likely to linger for years as government scientists try to nail down how much water imperiled salmon and smelt need in the delta.
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