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Sacramento San Joaquin Delta

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- A proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package was unveiled Wednesday to free up water supplies and aid Californians facing financial ruin. The proposal presented by Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders would provide millions of dollars to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. "We really don't know how bad the drought is going to be," Brown said to reporters at the state's emergency operations center. The plan contains money for emergency food and housing for those out of work because of the drought, including farmworkers, and to provide emergency drinking water to communities in need.
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NEWS
May 7, 1987 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Controversial legislation that would authorize the Deukmejian Administration to devise ways to export more surplus northern water to the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California while requiring that the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta be protected won narrow approval of an Assembly committee Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal protection of the tiny Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta smelt could halt water shipments to Southern California, create chronic water shortages and cost the state economy $12 billion, a coalition of water agencies said. The agencies made their claim a day before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is scheduled to begin hearings on whether to list the delta smelt as a threatened species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2007 | Eric Bailey
Volunteer anglers saved more than 6,000 fish that were among tens of thousands left stranded following repair work to a levee on an island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, officials said Monday. Volunteers used nets, buckets and a long pipe to funnel the fish over the levee and back into delta waters.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Legislation that would force the Deukmejian Administration to move quickly to increase water shipments to Southern and Central California was approved Tuesday by a Senate committee dominated by lawmakers from those areas. By lopsided votes, the Agriculture and Water Committee passed three bills by its chairman, Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1987
Reference is made to your Oct. 4 editorial, "Please, No More Fiascoes." Needless to say, your editorial staff and I disagree. Let me explain why. Words like consensus and compromise have a calming effect. They create the impression that all sides can sit down and resolve an issue--on the surface, a very plausible approach. With regard to water transfer, it is almost an impossible task. Take it from someone who has been there. One should not give one's opponents everything they want at one's own expense and wait with baited breath for some great expectation at some future date.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
A compromise bill to finance $120 million in flood control and levee rehabilitation work during the next decade in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta sailed out of an Assembly committee Wednesday and went to the floor. The bill, by Sen. Daniel E. Boatwright (D-Concord), cleared the Ways and Means Committee on a unanimous vote in what appears to be a fast track to the desk of Gov. George Deukmejian.
NEWS
December 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
Growth along the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta could drive up the cost of drinking water while reducing its quality for residents from the East Bay to San Diego, some water officials say. State and local officials are trying to agree on how to save California's largest source of drinking water, which supplies 22 million people. The fight has focused on how to ensure that water supplies are divided fairly among farmers, cities and aquatic wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1987
Your editorial "Delta Wearing Thin" (Nov. 18) brought out the very reasons why I have for several years been attempting to gain legislative approval for a concerted 10-year, $100-million effort to rehabilitate the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta levee system. Delta water flows into the homes of 16 million Californians, and all of us, whether from the north or south, have a stake in preserving and upgrading the levees. When the levees break water quality for all of us suffers from salt water intrusion.
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