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Sacramento San Joaquin Delta

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2009 | Associated Press
Many farmers, cities and industries in California that buy water from the federal government can expect to get a little more this summer. The Bureau of Reclamation says recent storms will allow it to boost the amount of water shipped to customers north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. But farmers on the San Joaquin Valley's parched west side still will get none of their federal water allotments this year. The cutbacks already have led to job losses, fallow fields and water rationing.
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NEWS
July 13, 1994 | Associated Press
Environmentalists who won federal protection for the delta smelt returned to court Tuesday, seeking more Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta fresh water for the tiny fish. Nine environmental and fishing organizations sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, claiming the smelt is being threatened with extinction because of inadequate water allocations in the government's 1994 protection plan.
NEWS
January 2, 1987
Two state agencies have agreed to a compromise that will clear the way for construction of the last four of 11 giant water export pumps in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The agreement between the Departments of Water Resources and Fish and Game calls for agricultural interests in Southern California to pay up to $25 million over the next five years to mitigate the damage the pumps will cause to Delta fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- It's not much longer than your pinkie, an aquatic weakling that skulks in a single brackish backwater of the West. Yet the diminutive fish is a big player in California water politics. For years, the delta smelt's survival has been a bone of contention between water managers and environmentalists -- a subject of lengthy court cases and, of late, defining judicial decrees. A decision Aug. 31 by U.S. District Judge Oliver W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988
The article on the state Water Resources Control Board's report on water quality in San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta ("Southland Must Live With Static Water Supply, State Report Says," Part I, Nov. 4) presented the issue in the usual simplistic way. Water issues in the state are nearly always presented as a war between selfish Northern Californian conservatists versus thirsty Southern California city dwellers. I, for one, am a Southern California city dwelling conservationist.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Controversial legislation that would authorize the Deukmejian Administration to devise ways to export more surplus northern water to the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California while requiring that the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta be protected won narrow approval of an Assembly committee Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal protection of the tiny Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta smelt could halt water shipments to Southern California, create chronic water shortages and cost the state economy $12 billion, a coalition of water agencies said. The agencies made their claim a day before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is scheduled to begin hearings on whether to list the delta smelt as a threatened species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2007 | Eric Bailey
Volunteer anglers saved more than 6,000 fish that were among tens of thousands left stranded following repair work to a levee on an island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, officials said Monday. Volunteers used nets, buckets and a long pipe to funnel the fish over the levee and back into delta waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- A proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package was unveiled Wednesday to free up water supplies and aid Californians facing financial ruin. The proposal presented by Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders would provide millions of dollars to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. "We really don't know how bad the drought is going to be," Brown said to reporters at the state's emergency operations center. The plan contains money for emergency food and housing for those out of work because of the drought, including farmworkers, and to provide emergency drinking water to communities in need.
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