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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1999
Butterfly populations in the Sacramento Valley and nearby foothills hit a 28-year low in 1999, according to UC Davis entomologist Arthur Shapiro. But the problem is not human intervention, he added. The villain was a freeze during Christmas week of 1998, which reduced the survival of overwintering eggs, caterpillars, pupae and adults, and a cool spring and summer, he said Tuesday. Of the region's 55 resident species, he said, 14 were largely or completely missing during his biweekly surveys.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The State Water Project, which helps supply a majority of Californians, will make small deliveries this year, officials said Friday as they increased the system's allocation to 5% from the historic zero announced in January. February and March storms in Northern California raised the levels of the state's two largest reservoirs enough to allow federal water managers to also significantly boost deliveries to wildlife refuges and irrigation districts with the most senior water rights in the Sacramento Valley.
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NEWS
July 22, 1998
A magnitude 4.5 earthquake centered just outside Redding in the upper Sacramento Valley early Tuesday broke windows and did other scattered minor damage but caused no injuries, local authorities reported. The quake occurred at 1:38 a.m. and was centered three miles northwest of the city of 70,000. It awoke many residents. David Oppenheimer of the U.S. Geological Survey said the temblor was unusually strong for the vicinity. He said seismic records going back to 1962 show no other quake over 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A decision by a federal appeals court Wednesday could allow for changes in water deliveries to irrigation districts that hold senior rights to Sacramento River supplies. The unanimous opinion by an 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned two previous rulings that found the federal government lacked discretion to alter water contracts with senior irrigators in the Sacramento Valley. The new decision sends the matter back to a district court for further consideration, leaving both sides in the nearly decade-old case unsure of the ultimate outcome.
BOOKS
January 21, 1990 | Charles Bowden, Bowden is a free-lance writer
For thousands of years, a periodic lake about 100 miles long in the Sacramento Valley would form a miasma of tules, waterfowl and mist rising off the morning waters. No one cared. Then gold was discovered at John Sutter's place, towns began to pock the Valley floor, fields were plowed, and the lake that came and went with the rains became something new: a problem, a public-policy issue, an adversary in a war that continues to this day.
NEWS
February 19, 1988
A Sacramento radio station received calls from several worried listeners when it rebroadcast a 2-year-old story about Sacramento Valley floods. The anxious callers apparently thought the story on KFBK was new despite five interruptions by the station to let listeners know it was recorded in 1986.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By David Karp
DOS PALOS, Calif. - Bagged rice may look like a mundane commodity, a bit incongruous at a local farmers market. But one taste of the variety grown by Koda Farms - with attractive, uniform kernels, alluring fragrance, soft texture and a rich, sweet flavor - makes clear that rice can be a delicacy well worth pursuing. "Their brown rice is different from what is produced in Japan, but has its own unique, nutty flavor," said Sonoko Sakai, a locally based cooking teacher who frequently travels to Japan and represents traditional Japanese rice growers in the United States.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 2006
This week in 1869, the tracks of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads met at Promontory Summit, Utah, and regular service began between Omaha and Sacramento. In the decades since its founding, Sacramento had served as the end of the line for gold prospectors, wagon trains, stagecoaches, steamboats and the Pony Express. With the completion of the First Transcontinental Railroad, the state capital was again in the spotlight of history. And for many, there it has remained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
HAMILTON CITY, Calif. - A shallow inland sea spreads across more than 160 square miles, speckled with egrets poking for crayfish among jewel-green rice shoots. The flooded fields could be mistaken for the rice paddies of Vietnam or southern China, but this is Northern California at the onset of severe drought. The scene is a testament to the inequities of California's system of water rights, a hierarchy of haves as old as the state. PHOTOS: The water diversion debate Thanks to seniority, powerful Central Valley irrigation districts that most Californians have never heard of are at the head of the line for vast amounts of water, even at the expense of the environment and the rest of the state.
OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “ Drying up the delta ,” March 23 Bettina Boxall's front-page article - accompanied by striking photos of flooded fields being fed by scarce water from sources that also supply our vanishing Northern California delta - is all the testimony that we should need to impress upon us the grotesque priorities that we are still following in allocating our state's most critical natural resource. Those priorities mean that we are growing rice for shipment to Asia by flooding an expanding desert landscape in the heart of the Central Valley, while millions of Californians are experiencing a disastrous water shortage and we deprive our most productive growers of reasonable access to water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Chris Megerian and Melanie Mason
ORLAND, Calif. -- Chad Arnold, 31, was painting his black dirt-track race car when he heard what sounded like an explosion. He called 911 and then headed toward the southbound lanes of Interstate 5, a couple hundred yards away. A former firefighter, he began helping first responders at the scene of Thursday's crash - a deadly collision between a FedEx freight truck and a charter bus filled with dozens of Los Angeles area high school students. Other neighbors also ran over to help, bringing water and blankets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | Chris Megerian and Paige St. John and Scott Gold
When they climbed on board the bus, most were strangers. Not friends, nor classmates. They were called together by aspiration: They were headed to Humboldt State University through a program designed for underprivileged students. Most would be the first in their family to go to college. They were called together, too, by fate: They were assigned to this bus because their last names began with the letters A through L. A little after 5:30 on Thursday evening, now 500 miles into the trip, their bus carrying 48 people thundered past the fertile farms that line Interstate 5. A FedEx tractor-trailer veered across a wide median and struck the bus head-on.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By David Karp
DOS PALOS, Calif. - Bagged rice may look like a mundane commodity, a bit incongruous at a local farmers market. But one taste of the variety grown by Koda Farms - with attractive, uniform kernels, alluring fragrance, soft texture and a rich, sweet flavor - makes clear that rice can be a delicacy well worth pursuing. "Their brown rice is different from what is produced in Japan, but has its own unique, nutty flavor," said Sonoko Sakai, a locally based cooking teacher who frequently travels to Japan and represents traditional Japanese rice growers in the United States.
OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “ Drying up the delta ,” March 23 Bettina Boxall's front-page article - accompanied by striking photos of flooded fields being fed by scarce water from sources that also supply our vanishing Northern California delta - is all the testimony that we should need to impress upon us the grotesque priorities that we are still following in allocating our state's most critical natural resource. Those priorities mean that we are growing rice for shipment to Asia by flooding an expanding desert landscape in the heart of the Central Valley, while millions of Californians are experiencing a disastrous water shortage and we deprive our most productive growers of reasonable access to water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
HAMILTON CITY, Calif. - A shallow inland sea spreads across more than 160 square miles, speckled with egrets poking for crayfish among jewel-green rice shoots. The flooded fields could be mistaken for the rice paddies of Vietnam or southern China, but this is Northern California at the onset of severe drought. The scene is a testament to the inequities of California's system of water rights, a hierarchy of haves as old as the state. PHOTOS: The water diversion debate Thanks to seniority, powerful Central Valley irrigation districts that most Californians have never heard of are at the head of the line for vast amounts of water, even at the expense of the environment and the rest of the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Police officials in Manteca, Calif., said Tuesday that they had launched a hate-crime investigation after vandals defaced a mosque with vulgar graffiti and left strips of raw bacon strewn on the ground. Manteca police Sgt. Jodie Estarziau said officers responded to the Islamic Center of Manteca on Jan. 28 after receiving reports of "spray-painted vulgarities" and pieces of raw bacon that were found in a parking lot just inside the front gate of the property. Muslims do not eat pork products and bigots often use pigs or pork to offend Muslims, said officials with the Sacramento Valley chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The State Water Project, which helps supply a majority of Californians, will make small deliveries this year, officials said Friday as they increased the system's allocation to 5% from the historic zero announced in January. February and March storms in Northern California raised the levels of the state's two largest reservoirs enough to allow federal water managers to also significantly boost deliveries to wildlife refuges and irrigation districts with the most senior water rights in the Sacramento Valley.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2014 | By David Pierson
ARTOIS, Calif. - Nestled in a corner of the Sacramento Valley known for its rice, almonds and walnuts, densely packed rows of manicured olive trees stretch toward the horizon. This 1,700-acre spread is the domain of California Olive Ranch, an upstart company with big ambitions. The U.S. is the world's No. 3 consumer of olive oil, drizzling 293,000 metric tons of the stuff over salads and pizzas last year. Yet almost every drop was produced overseas in countries including Spain, Italy and Greece.
FOOD
October 25, 2013 | David Karp
The 19-year-old Encino farmers market is one of the two best in the San Fernando Valley, because of its large size and quality, and its preponderance of farmers over prepared food. It's on a par with Studio City, which the manager, Carole Gallegos, ran until 2011, but it's in a pleasanter location, in a park, with better parking. The market's earnings go to ONEgeneration , a respected nonprofit that provides care to seniors and children. One recent addition is award-winning Nuvo olive oil , from century-old trees in Oroville, in the Sacramento Valley.
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