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Sacred Cows

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OPINION
October 16, 2009
California restricts billboards along rural freeways, but there's a spot on Interstate 5 near Coalinga that's a better advertisement for vegetarianism than any Madison Avenue genius could ever devise. It is Harris Ranch, an 800-acre feedlot and meat-processing operation whose smell assaults passersby long before the panorama of thousands of cattle packed atop layers of their own manure appears. It's not without reason that wags have dubbed the place "Cowschwitz.":Cowschwitz.JPG Author Michael Pollan, whose 2006 bestseller, "The Omnivore's Dilemma," holds a high place amid a growing body of popular literature and scientific research critical of industrial agriculture, told an interviewer last year that the sight of Harris Ranch was one of the things that caused him to change the way he ate. This week, Harris Ranch Beef Co. Chairman David E. Wood got his revenge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Ng
In the weeks since renegade National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed that the U.S. government is harvesting phone and online data, a humorous series of Internet memes has been taking comic aim at artist Shepard Fairey's famous "Hope" image of Barack Obama. The parodies, which have appeared on numerous blogs and news sites in recent weeks, deconstruct Fairey's image, giving it a biting, NSA-themed spin. In one parody, Obama is shown wearing headphones with the words "Yes we scan" emblazoned above him and with text circling his head that reads: "United we progress toward a perfectly monitored society.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
With a recent increase in violent crime, Port of Spain, Trinidad, isn't one of the easier places to direct a movie. You might be in the middle of filming a scene and from out of nowhere overly vigilant cops draw their guns and chase one of your actors. Shaun Escayg knows these perils firsthand. When the Trinidadian-born filmmaker was shooting a scene in Port of Spain for his new short, “Fish,” he was startled to see his actor pursued by law enforcement officials, who had mistaken a scripted robbery for the real thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
With a recent increase in violent crime, Port of Spain, Trinidad, isn't one of the easier places to direct a movie. You might be in the middle of filming a scene and from out of nowhere overly vigilant cops draw their guns and chase one of your actors. Shaun Escayg knows these perils firsthand. When the Trinidadian-born filmmaker was shooting a scene in Port of Spain for his new short, “Fish,” he was startled to see his actor pursued by law enforcement officials, who had mistaken a scripted robbery for the real thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The happiest fact of "Lagunatics," the "musical roast" of life in Laguna Beach that launched the county's Day Without Art observance Monday night, was its ability to blend a let's-put-on-a-show exuberance with consistent wit and sparkle, and a willingness to poke impish fun at everything and everyone in "the village." In "Lagunatics," no sacred cows went unbranded.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Congress, finally consigning "one of the great sacred cows" to the slaughterhouse, voted today to authorize the Pentagon to close unneeded military bases, at an estimated saving of up to $5 billion a year. The Senate passed the measure, 82 to 7. Two hours later, the House approved it, 370 to 31, sending the bill to President Reagan, who is expected to sign it.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1993 | MURRAY WEIDENBAUM, MURRAY WEIDENBAUM is director of the Center for the Study of American Business at Washington University in St. Louis
If it was only Richard Nixon who could go to China, perhaps only Bill Clinton can bite a similarly tough domestic bullet. I have in mind the new President dealing with the types of business and labor "protection" that raise the cost of producing goods and services in the United States and reduce American competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Stock prices tumbled Monday, depressed by economic worries and doubts about the durability of the market's early-1991 rally. Barely two weeks after breaching the historic 3,000 level, the Dow Jones industrial average finished down 35.40 at 2,876.98. The Dow average was particularly hurt by losses in such widely held issues as IBM and Pepsico. Big Board volume was a slow 149.9 million shares, down from 153.9 million Friday.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1991 | CATHERINE COLLINS, CATHERINE COLLINS is a Washington writer
Three of the nation's largest industries--retailing, insurance and cable television--are atop Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum's ambitious consumer agenda. "My goal is simple and straightforward: save consumers money by protecting them from price-fixing and price gouging," the Ohio Democrat said on the Senate floor. His Consumer Protection Against Price-Fixing Act (S. 429) is designed to end what is known as resale price maintenance, or vertical pricing.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark bestseller that is stirring heated debate, a trio of writers slaughters the sacred cows of Latin America's political and intellectual tradition. The title sets the tone: "Manual of the Perfect Latin American Idiot." The "idiot" in question marches in a legion of political bosses, economists, intellectuals, guerrillas and clerics whose leftist, populist and nationalist ideas are the source of Latin America's miseries.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012
A comic who specializes in a taboo-busting form of mischievously delivered shock and awe, Sarah Silverman's profile isn't quite as sky-high as when she was inspiring complimentary magazine profiles in the wake of her one-woman-show-turned-movie "Jesus Is Magic," but she still has a sharp eye for digging into sacred cows. Here she'll be joined by a roster of guests that includes Natasha Leggero, Eddie Pepitone and more. Largo, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A. Thurs., 8:30 p.m. $25. http://www.largo-la.com .
OPINION
October 16, 2009
California restricts billboards along rural freeways, but there's a spot on Interstate 5 near Coalinga that's a better advertisement for vegetarianism than any Madison Avenue genius could ever devise. It is Harris Ranch, an 800-acre feedlot and meat-processing operation whose smell assaults passersby long before the panorama of thousands of cattle packed atop layers of their own manure appears. It's not without reason that wags have dubbed the place "Cowschwitz.":Cowschwitz.JPG Author Michael Pollan, whose 2006 bestseller, "The Omnivore's Dilemma," holds a high place amid a growing body of popular literature and scientific research critical of industrial agriculture, told an interviewer last year that the sight of Harris Ranch was one of the things that caused him to change the way he ate. This week, Harris Ranch Beef Co. Chairman David E. Wood got his revenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2008 | Steve Appleford; Mikael Wood
Staind "The Illusion of Progress" Flip/Atlantic Staind specializes in loud, brooding ballads of manly sadness (see "It's Been Awhile"), a genre once perfected by Alice in Chains and suffocated by the overwrought Creed. With pierced eyebrow and acoustic guitar, Staind singer Aaron Lewis wails and moans through the tears, his songs less about rage than vulnerability, his hooks as soothing to needy headbangers as to their moms. The hard-rock quartet stretches out on its sixth studio album, recorded in Lewis' barn in Massachusetts with producer Johnny K (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2008 | Michael Sragow, Baltimore Sun
Few big-studio movies that are lavishly promoted and favorably reviewed arrive dead on arrival at the box office. But "Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story," Judd Apatow and Jake Kasdan's volcanically funny spoof of musical biopics like "Coal Miner's Daughter" failed to attract audiences from its first showings a week ago. Could it be that audiences just don't want to see wiseacre moviemakers lampoon Very Important Movies? From "Airplane!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
IF the question is: What farm animal is least likely to have a secret life? the answer would have to be: Cows. Why? Be-cows. No, seriously -- look at them. The face: expressionless. The movement: minimal, except for cud-chewing, ear-flicking and the occasional swatting of flies. Main contributions to society: Depleting the ozone, and producing milk and cheese.
OPINION
August 19, 2006
THE NATION'S BAN on foreign ownership of U.S. airlines is fast becoming another political sacred cow. Twice during his presidency, George W. Bush has rightly proposed softening the ban in order to attract more overseas investors to the country's financially shaky airlines, and to expand opportunities for American carriers around the world. But both times Congress has loudly rebuffed the president.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
IF the question is: What farm animal is least likely to have a secret life? the answer would have to be: Cows. Why? Be-cows. No, seriously -- look at them. The face: expressionless. The movement: minimal, except for cud-chewing, ear-flicking and the occasional swatting of flies. Main contributions to society: Depleting the ozone, and producing milk and cheese.
NEWS
May 17, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen said Sunday that behind-the-scenes changes in President Clinton's proposed energy tax may have made it possible to move his massive package of revenue increases through the Senate "virtually intact." Other top Democrats also sounded notes of optimism after the House Ways and Means Committee handed Clinton's economic program a significant victory last week and the Senate began preparing to consider the tax package.
NEWS
July 16, 2006 | Leslie Josephs and Edison Lopez, Associated Press Writers
Hundreds of villagers march side by side across the wind-blasted Andean plain, closing in on their prey: herds of nervous, fast-moving vicunas -- the smaller, wilder cousins of llamas and alpacas. Chanting and shaking a long rope with colorful streamers, the participants encircle the shaggy-coated animals in a ritual that was known to the ancient Inca but nearly abandoned in the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | Peter Carlson, The Washington Post
Lewis Lapham flips up the top of his Zippo lighter, ignites another Parliament and inhales deeply. At 71, he's about to step down after 28 years as the editor of Harper's magazine, but he's not talking about that right now. Instead, he's telling the story of his aborted job interview at the CIA back in 1957, when Lapham, after matriculating at Hotchkiss and Yale and Cambridge, hoped for a career as a Cold Warrior.
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