Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSacred Sites
IN THE NEWS

Sacred Sites

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
It's a new era in Myanmar as the country opens up to political reforms - and to a growing number of  tourists. Long isolated and little known to Westerners, the country once known as Burma offers a window on life in Asia before the advent of Starbucks and W hotels. Friendly Planet Travel offers a 13-day tour called Mystical Myanmar with airfare from Los Angeles for $3,299 per person -- and an extra $100 discount for those who book soon. The tour starts with a flight to the former capital Yangon via Taipei, Taiwan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
April 18, 2014 | By Michele Bigley
MAKAWAO, Maui - "Don't ask for anything while you are in this canyon," Sydney Smith, my guide and a longtime Hawaii resident, said as we balanced precariously on rocks, descending deep into Maliko Gulch. "A film crew was once here, set up a tripod, lights, models and was just about to take photos, when the photographer said, 'Now we just need some wind.' A powerful gust came whooshing through the valley, knocking down the tripods and light reflectors. And then like that" - she snapped her fingers - "the wind vanished.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The question of access to a major site holy to both Islam and Judaism following Arab disturbances there has awakened the potentially explosive question of who has the rightful claim to it. To Muslims, the area is known as the Haram al Sharif, the Sacred Enclosure, home to Al Aqsa mosque and the Dome of the Rock--shrines so holy to Muslims that to die in their defense would earn a believer a direct trip to Heaven. To Jews, it is the Temple Mount, site of the last Jewish Temple destroyed by the Romans more than 1,900 years ago. When Jewish worshipers pray at the adjacent Western Wall, they are expressing devotion to the Temple Mount: The Wall, all that remains of the temple, is a remnant of a retaining structure at the base of the Temple Mount plateau, located in Jerusalem's Old City.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Luke O'Neil, guest blogger
This week a video emerged online of a man BASE-jumping from the top of New York's 1 World Trade Center. The video is a lot of things: Thrilling and frightening. Extremely stupid also comes to mind. Yet another way of looking at it is as a grave desecration of hallowed ground, a veritable slap in the face to our collective national pain. That's the response the Port Authority, which owns and operates the building, had to the video, and to the news that the four men involved in the jump had turned themselves into police on Monday . “The Port Authority joins the NYPD in condemning this lawless and selfish act that clearly endangered the public,” the agency said in a statement . “One of the jumpers worked construction at the WTC and violated the spirit of respect and reverence for this sacred site that almost all connected with the WTC project feel.” James Brady, Kyle Hartwell, Marco Markovich and Andrew Rossig, three of whom parachuted from the top of the country's tallest tower in September, have been charged with felony burglary, misdemeanor reckless endangerment and misdemeanor jumping from a structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Wendy Smith
"Anyone who writes about Druids and mysteriously coordinated landscapes," Graham Robb admits, "must expect to be treated with suspicion. " Indeed, although the Druids were the learned elite of the ancient Celts, they are better known today as the inspiration for such flaky goings on as the gathering at Stonehenge of ersatz Druids in white robes celebrating the summer solstice. (Stonehenge actually antedates the Druids by millenniums.) They seem an odd subject for the critically praised biographer of Balzac, Hugo and Rimbaud, a historian whose previous works seldom look back further than the French Revolution.
OPINION
September 13, 2002
I note in "Tribes Flex Power on Sacred Sites" (Sept. 10) a proposed new law to require Indian tribes to be notified of any proposed construction within 20 miles of their reservations to prevent construction on "sacred sites." One would believe this would lead to endless lawsuits. My question is about the large number of Indian casinos being built on reservations--are these, by their very nature, not sacred sites? It seems to be acceptable to devastate hundreds of acres of reservation lands for a gambling hall to be built, but I guess these are the new "sacred sites."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | David Reyes
The county's toll road agency filed an appeal Friday of the California Coastal Commission's decision rejecting a controversial toll road extension. According to the appeal, the commission exceeded its review and its decision was not in compliance with the state Coastal Act. The document was filed with the U.S. Department of Commerce. At a raucous meeting Wednesday in Del Mar before 3,500 people, the commission rejected the proposed 16-mile route through San Onofre State Beach by an 8-2 vote.
OPINION
September 17, 2003
In the last days of the state legislative session, Democrats pulled off a miracle: They made the Republicans look good. Democrats' frenzy in the last few weeks to pass every pet bill and get it to Gov. Gray Davis while he's under recall pressure made Republicans' lockjawed obstructionism on fixing the budget shortfall fade from memory.
OPINION
June 15, 2003
Re "San Juan OKs School's Athletic Fields," May 21: Both houses of the California Legislature overwhelmingly supported legislation declaring the importance of preserving California's Native American sacred sites. But San Juan Capistrano council members ignored legislative guidance on cultural resources and took actions to develop and destroy a Native American cultural heritage site of unparalleled importance by approving a zone change for the Junipero Serra High School and aquatic complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The Chumash tribe has expressed interest in buying a 450-acre slice of a contaminated nuclear research facility in the hills between the Simi and San Fernando valleys, hoping to preserve a cave that its members consider sacred. The tribe's inquiries about acquiring part of the 2,849-acre Santa Susana Field Laboratory have stirred concern among some residents who fear the purchase might be a back door to building a casino. "I very much respect their desire to protect sacred sites but I want to make sure any such action precludes the establishment of a casino," Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Wendy Smith
"Anyone who writes about Druids and mysteriously coordinated landscapes," Graham Robb admits, "must expect to be treated with suspicion. " Indeed, although the Druids were the learned elite of the ancient Celts, they are better known today as the inspiration for such flaky goings on as the gathering at Stonehenge of ersatz Druids in white robes celebrating the summer solstice. (Stonehenge actually antedates the Druids by millenniums.) They seem an odd subject for the critically praised biographer of Balzac, Hugo and Rimbaud, a historian whose previous works seldom look back further than the French Revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The Chumash tribe has expressed interest in buying a 450-acre slice of a contaminated nuclear research facility in the hills between the Simi and San Fernando valleys, hoping to preserve a cave that its members consider sacred. The tribe's inquiries about acquiring part of the 2,849-acre Santa Susana Field Laboratory have stirred concern among some residents who fear the purchase might be a back door to building a casino. "I very much respect their desire to protect sacred sites but I want to make sure any such action precludes the establishment of a casino," Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks said.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
It's a new era in Myanmar as the country opens up to political reforms - and to a growing number of  tourists. Long isolated and little known to Westerners, the country once known as Burma offers a window on life in Asia before the advent of Starbucks and W hotels. Friendly Planet Travel offers a 13-day tour called Mystical Myanmar with airfare from Los Angeles for $3,299 per person -- and an extra $100 discount for those who book soon. The tour starts with a flight to the former capital Yangon via Taipei, Taiwan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The last time members of a Northern California Indian tribe held a coming-of-age ceremony beside a popular river, they were heckled by boaters. Drunks yelled racial taunts, jet-ski engines roared and a woman flipped down her bathing-suit top as she passed them. The tiny group known as the Winnemem Wintu saw it as their right to hold a sacred ceremony on their ancestral land undisturbed. But some vacationers on the McCloud River arm of Lake Shasta near Redding were more in tune with a man who shouted: "Hey dude — it's our river too!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
On its way to the ocean, the San Luis Rey River runs through a hilly, brushy parcel of land known as Gregory Canyon. With large stands of coastal oak and cottonwood trees and a population of rattlesnakes and even a few mountain lions, the canyon is tucked away in a sparsely populated part of northeast San Diego County, just south of California 76 and three miles east of Interstate 15. Above the river, on a recent afternoon, an osprey was...
WORLD
April 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of Greek and Armenian priests and worshipers exchanged blows at one of Christianity's holiest shrines on Orthodox Palm Sunday, and used palm fronds to pummel police who tried to break up the brawl. The fight at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, built over the Jerusalem site where tradition says Jesus was resurrected, erupted when Armenian clergy kicked out a Greek priest from their midst, pushed him down and kicked him, witnesses said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The last time members of a Northern California Indian tribe held a coming-of-age ceremony beside a popular river, they were heckled by boaters. Drunks yelled racial taunts, jet-ski engines roared and a woman flipped down her bathing-suit top as she passed them. The tiny group known as the Winnemem Wintu saw it as their right to hold a sacred ceremony on their ancestral land undisturbed. But some vacationers on the McCloud River arm of Lake Shasta near Redding were more in tune with a man who shouted: "Hey dude — it's our river too!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989 | H. G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
An overflow crowd packed the Escondido City Council chambers Thursday as Indian leaders from throughout Southern California testified before a U. S. Senate committee about a host of problems besetting local tribes and their reservations. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii) chaired the hearing of the Select Committee on Indian Affairs and told the estimated audience of 250 that he is "aware of the sad and tragic history of Indians in California." Inouye began the hearing by reminding representatives of the various tribes about the hundreds of Indian treaties violated by the federal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | David Reyes
The county's toll road agency filed an appeal Friday of the California Coastal Commission's decision rejecting a controversial toll road extension. According to the appeal, the commission exceeded its review and its decision was not in compliance with the state Coastal Act. The document was filed with the U.S. Department of Commerce. At a raucous meeting Wednesday in Del Mar before 3,500 people, the commission rejected the proposed 16-mile route through San Onofre State Beach by an 8-2 vote.
TRAVEL
August 19, 2007 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Once travelers reach Lhasa, the options for sightseeing on the Tibetan Plateau are almost as dizzying as the altitude. Agencies in seemingly every hotel offer road trips to formerly isolated places, such as sacred Mt. Kailash and Samye, Tibet's first monastery. You need only a Land Cruiser, the preferred mode of transport on the plateau. The highways are a gift from the Chinese government, which began building roads almost immediately after it occupied the region in 1950.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|