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Saddam Kamel Majid

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NEWS
August 12, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of senior Iraqi officials to Jordan this week could well be the critical show of weakness in dictator Saddam Hussein's regime that U.S. officials have prayed for and plotted since the 1991 Persian Gulf War. When he led a convoy of armored sedans across the Iraqi desert and into Jordan on Tuesday, Lt. Gen.
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NEWS
August 12, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of senior Iraqi officials to Jordan this week could well be the critical show of weakness in dictator Saddam Hussein's regime that U.S. officials have prayed for and plotted since the 1991 Persian Gulf War. When he led a convoy of armored sedans across the Iraqi desert and into Jordan on Tuesday, Lt. Gen.
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NEWS
February 24, 1996 | WAIEL FALEH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two defector sons-in-law of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein were killed by clan members who stormed their residence Friday--three days after their return from exile and a day after their wives divorced them--according to the Iraqi News Agency. Lt. Gen. Hussein Kamel Majid and his brother Saddam Kamel Majid had vowed to topple the Iraqi leader during their six-month stay in Jordan.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein planned to invade Kuwait and Saudi Arabia this month but called off the attack when one of his top aides defected to Jordan, the defector said Sunday. Lt. Gen. Hussein Kamel Majid, who was head of the country's clandestine weapons program and is Saddam Hussein's son-in-law, said he attended meetings of the Cabinet and the Revolutionary Command Council in which the invasions were discussed.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | From Reuters
The Iraqi government Saturday gave the United Nations fresh data on its ballistic missile program and scoffed at Washington for sending troops to the Persian Gulf to forestall a perceived Iraqi threat to Jordan and Kuwait. At the same time, comments by the press and officials in Jordan and Kuwait tended to support Iraq's view that the United States was overreacting. In Baghdad, Rolf Ekeus, head of the U.N.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of dictator Saddam Hussein's daughters and the former head of his regime's clandestine arms industry are among more than a dozen top Iraqis who have defected, giving a rare glimpse of high-level tumult in Baghdad and prompting President Clinton to promise Thursday that America will defend Jordan if Iraq attempts to retaliate against it for granting the group asylum.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The speedy elimination of Saddam Hussein's son-in-law after Iraq's most famous defector was lured back to Baghdad has proved once again the ruthlessness of the country's ironfisted leader and shown that his grip on power is now more secure than ever five years after the Persian Gulf War, analysts said Saturday.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq announced Sunday that it is ready to reveal military secrets it has withheld for years from the United Nations, a move that seemed aimed at limiting whatever damage a high-ranking defector might inflict on the regime. Letters were sent to Hans Blix, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and Rolf Ekeus, the head of the U.N.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The architect of Iraq's war machine, who defected to Jordan last Tuesday, emerged from his hiding place Saturday to call for the overthrow of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, his father-in-law. "We will work seriously to change the regime in Iraq . . . through political and military means," Lt. Gen. Hussein Kamel Majid told a press conference at King Hussein's heavily guarded palace in Amman, the Jordanian capital.
WORLD
August 22, 2003 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writers
Ali Hassan Majid, the notorious cousin of Saddam Hussein who earned the nickname "Chemical Ali" for using poisonous gas to kill thousands of Kurds, has been captured, the U.S. military said Thursday. Majid, who at one point in the Iraq war had been reported killed, ranked fifth on the U.S. list of the 55 most-wanted Iraqi figures. He was the most powerful member of the former dictator's inner circle still at large, save Hussein himself.
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