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August 6, 2009
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SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
CALGARY, Canada - The Saddledome, along with its ever-changing corporate names, was almost like a second home for goalie Martin Jones in his formative hockey years. His junior team, the Calgary Hitmen, shared the building with the NHL's Calgary Flames, and back in those days, Darryl Sutter happened to be the Flames' general manager. On Monday, Jones and Sutter returned to beat the Flames as the Kings won their eighth straight game, surviving a late scare when Calgary scored twice in the last 4 minutes 31 seconds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2010 | By Robert Abele
Informally sketched but deeply felt, Bradley Beesley's documentary "Sweethearts of the Prison Rodeo" mingles with the spirited cowgirl inmates who compete in Oklahoma's annual state penitentiary rodeo, a 70-year tradition of Wild West-style showbiz that began to allow females to participate only in 2006. Although there's a queasy tinge of gladiatorial bloodlust in seeing society's punished put themselves in hooves' and horns' way for spectator sport, the tears in one woman's eyes as she describes leaving the correctional facility for an afternoon of outdoor training speak wonders.
FOOD
February 6, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
This is the season for wild birds and boar, for elk and all manner of game. Some is flown in from Scotland or Texas or New Zealand. And not every chef or restaurant indulges, so when they do, be ready to take advantage. It's easy to see chefs' fascination with exotic birds and animals. Game's flavor is deep and true. It also takes real skill to cook without drying it out and a keen sense of what flavors to pair with it. And since the supply is sporadic and as certain game comes in out of season, chefs have to be flexible.
HOME & GARDEN
June 5, 2010 | By Sam Watters
From the TV glory days of "Mr. Ed," we know that horses have a lot to say if given a chance — not a surprise considering they were hard-working, come-rain-or-shine mass transit for millenniums before being run out of Dodge by Henry Ford. And don't forget the insults — horse glue, horse meat, horse trading, horse play and horse you-know-what. The sardonic Ed once remarked to Wilbur, "Some way to treat your friends who helped conquer the West." Ed's descendents revere one Angeleno for his unfailing devotion to the hoof.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
If an award for comeback athlete of the year existed, my vote would go to jockey Patrick Valenzuela. It was only last year that he went to the edge with a cocaine addiction that forced him out of Santa Anita to the circuits of New Mexico. But, when given another chance, he redeemed himself at the Oak Tree meeting, winning the jockey title. If he wins the Belmont today aboard Sunday Silence, that will give him the Triple Crown. Not many jockeys ever win the Triple Crown, including Bill Shoemaker.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
A Ducati assembly line worker told me five years ago that every second motorcycle made at the company's Bologna, Italy, factory is a Monster. A major U.S. Ducati retailer told me recently, “Monster is Ducati.” Since beginning production of the naked sport bike in 1992, it has shipped more than 250,000 of the little Monsters , the company recently announced. But until two weeks ago I'd never even sat on one. An hour after I did, I was a convert. I rode a route that started around Laurel Canyon and Mulholland, wandered through Topanga Canyon and the Malibu mountains, and circled back via the freeway.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Richard Verrier and Ben Fritz
A crew member died on the set of Walt Disney Studios' big-budget film "The Lone Ranger," the Burbank studio said Friday. "We regretfully confirm that a 'Lone Ranger' crew member has passed away after being taken to a local hospital. Our hearts and thoughts are with his family, friends, and colleagues at this time, and our full support is behind the investigation into the circumstances of this terrible event," Disney said in a statement. The incident involved a diver who reportedly drowned while prepping a tank for an underwater shooting scene in the Los Angeles area, and did not occur during filming, the studio said.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
Motorcycles represent a lot of things: freedom, power, fearlessness. With Harley-Davidson's new Softail Slim, unveiled Wednesday, "exposure" would also be appropriate. The Milwaukee manufacturer has stripped its classic Softail to its skivvies with a retro bobber that highlights the brute force of the machine. Starting at $15,499, the new-for-2012 Softail Slim represents a sort of Harley-style spring cleaning, for which every bit of bling was removed to showcase the bike's essentials.
SPORTS
June 3, 1990 | BRAD McKINZIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Favored Takin On The Cash broke on the lead and was never really challenged in winning the $233,000 Kindergarten Stakes for 2-year-olds at Los Alamitos Saturday night. With Danny Cardoza in the saddle for his third career Kindergarten victory, the Dash For Cash colt won by one length and was timed in 17.65 seconds for 350 yards. Takin On The Cash has won three of his five career starts and earned $185,000.
SPORTS
December 14, 2013 | By Ben Bolch
Question for wannabe NBA general managers: If you had a chance to add an inefficient scorer who plays passable defense while possessing one of the league's worst contracts, you'd pass, right? Pete D'Alessandro wouldn't. The new Sacramento Kings general manager couldn't resist the allure of Rudy Gay, who scores points galore but needs a lot of shots to do so. His player efficiency rating was 116th in the NBA at the time of the seven-player trade between the Kings and Toronto Raptors, which cost the Kings a lot more than starting point guard Greivis Vasquez and a passel of nobodies.
SPORTS
October 26, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Most people think next weekend's horse racing extravaganza at Santa Anita is the Breeders' Cup. It's actually the Mike and Gary Show. They are Mike Smith and Gary Stevens, the Peyton Manning and Tom Brady of their sport. They are long in experience and tooth, star jockeys who have been around ... and around ... and around. Each has won more than 5,000 races and millions of dollars in racing purses. Each has won each Triple Crown race at least once, Stevens three times each. Stevens has won eight Breeders' Cup races, Smith has the record with 17. Each has been inducted into racing's Hall of Fame, Stevens in 1997 and Smith in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2013 | By Martha Groves
In a quainter age, before Lamborghinis and Ferraris with big horsepower under the hood ripped along Rodeo Drive, the Beverly Hills thoroughfare featured … actual horsepower. For four decades starting in 1924, riders in boots and jodhpurs clip-clopped on a bridle path that extended along the Rodeo median north of the city's commercial zone to Sunset Boulevard and then on Sunset between the city's eastern and western limits. Early photos show equestrians ambling under a rustic wooden archway reading "Ye Bridle Path from Beverly Hills to Sea and Mountains.
NATIONAL
September 29, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The second phase of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill trial begins Monday in New Orleans, restarting a legal juggernaut that could saddle the energy giant with the largest environmental penalty in U.S. history, determine the future health of the Gulf of Mexico and calculate, finally, the amount of crude oil that spewed from the crippled well. The case - which involves a phalanx of federal and state prosecutors, attorneys for several multinational companies, and highly complex engineering testimony - has been droning on with little fanfare since February.
SPORTS
June 7, 2013 | Chris Dufresne
The comeback of Gary Stevens was never intended for a real Triple Crown race aboard a horse named Oxbow. No preconceived game plan put him in the winner's circle at the Preakness last month, much less on his way to Saturday's Belmont Stakes. Stevens' comeback was supposed to be fictional, made for TV, on an HBO series called "Luck. " His redemption was coming through his portrayal of Ronnie Jenkins, the Jack Daniels-drinking jockey character executive producer David Milch based on Stevens, who retired in 2005 after a Hall of Fame career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
OAKLAND - State and regional transportation officials announced plans Wednesday for a retrofit to the new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge that will cost up to $10 million and effectively do the job of nearly 100 massive bolts that failed earlier this year. Questions remain, however, about whether the world's largest single-tower, self-anchored suspension span will open on Labor Day weekend as planned. The new span will replace the one that partially collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.
SPORTS
March 1, 1997
The news of Bill Shoemaker suing for malpractice got me to thinking: What's the most publicly glaring case of malpractice in any profession? My best answer is that many years ago a jockey had a lead in the Kentucky Derby, but then stood up in the saddle before reaching the finish line and lost the race. PAUL McELHERNE La Canada Flintridge
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
HUNTINGTON LAKE, Calif. - Comanche has one pale blue eye, one deep brown and a prancing gait that has cowboy Morgan Austin suspecting this mystery horse once paraded around an arena. Until two weeks ago, Comanche wouldn't let anyone in the saddle. It took Morgan, 17, two months of talking to him "real quiet-like," slipping on a saddle blanket, then the saddle, before he could hoist his own lanky frame onto the brown-and-white quarter horse. Now, on a day when the sky is pale with heat and ragged breaths of wind kick up thick, sticky dust, Comanche and Morgan lead the way down a boulder-strewn Sierra trail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Recruiting a new leader for a big museum can take months - sometimes more than a year - involving search committees, consultants and rounds of interviews and negotiations. In the case of the Autry National Center of the American West, finding its fourth chief executive since opening 25 years ago was a much simpler affair. The biggest challenge was for board chair Marshall McKay, tired from a 12-hour day of meetings, to muster the energy to rush through a hotel corridor in Portland, Ore., catch up with the man he'd pegged as the Autry's next leader, and make him a proposal from out of the blue.
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