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Saddleback Associates

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BUSINESS
August 18, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Saddleback Associates, a Santa Ana developer, and Santa Margarita Co., an enormous South County landowner, have formed a joint venture to develop an eight-acre, $11-million complex of 16 buildings for light industry. The new Saddleback Business Center is the third such joint venture by Santa Margarita Co. in Rancho Santa Margarita's business park. The two previous ventures were with Koll Co. and Lincoln Property Co. Both are nearly 100% leased, Santa Margarita Co. says.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Saddleback Associates, a Santa Ana developer, and Santa Margarita Co., an enormous South County landowner, have formed a joint venture to develop an eight-acre, $11-million complex of 16 buildings for light industry. The new Saddleback Business Center is the third such joint venture by Santa Margarita Co. in Rancho Santa Margarita's business park. The two previous ventures were with Koll Co. and Lincoln Property Co. Both are nearly 100% leased, Santa Margarita Co. says.
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REAL ESTATE
July 16, 1989
Construction has begun on the $7.6-million Saddleback Del Oro, a 92,604-square-foot industrial project in Oceanside. The project will have 17 buildings with 4,000 to 7,000 square feet each when it is completed later this year. It is located at 1931-1963 Plaza Real, inside Rancho Del Oro's Technology Park. The project is being developed by Santa Ana-based Saddleback Associates. Grubb & Ellis is exclusive leasing agent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2000 | Sean Kirwan, (949) 574-4202
Plans for two five-acre business parks off Avenida de las Banderas will go before the City Council at its meeting tonight. Saddleback Associates have submitted a proposal to build nine office buildings, called Thomas Business Park, that will be divided into 12 units on a 5.5-acre parcel of land at the intersection of Banderas and Aventura Esperanza. The buildings will have nearly 74,000 square feet of floor space with 206 off-street parking spots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1999 | Alex Katz, (949) 574-4206
Blankets, sweatshirts and jackets are needed for homeless and low-income residents this winter. Serving People in Need, an Orange County charity, is collecting donations of warm clothing, canned food and unwrapped toys in good condition at a local drop-off center. Donations will be accepted at Name of the Game Embroidery, 22722 Lambert St., #1702, Lake Forest, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until Dec. 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1994 | BOB ELSTON
Rogers Severson thought he and Jaime could go far together. Both were paralyzed with spinal cord injuries in 1986 and were learning to walk again at Casa Colina Center for Rehabilitation in Pomona. Severson, 46 at the time, severed his spinal cord in a horse riding accident; Jaime did it in a motorcycle mishap. But when therapy sessions began one day, Jaime was not there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Paralyzed by a spinal cord injury in 1986, real estate developer Rogers Severson sought out a leading rehabilitation facility after doctors told the former college athlete he'd never walk again. Six months later, he walked out of Casa Colina Center for Rehabilitation in Pomona with the aid of a cane and the realization that he possessed what most patients there did not: excellent insurance and the personal means to pay for top-flight care. He vowed to help change that. Almost a year to the day after he was thrown from a mule, breaking two vertebrae, Severson stood before those gathered at a fundraising luncheon to benefit the charity he'd founded, the Spinal Cord Injury Special Fund.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | ANN CONWAY
Talk about the in-crowd. If you were a member of symphony society, there was only one place to be in Orange County on Saturday night: a suite at the Westin South Coast Plaza hotel in Costa Mesa. There, above it all, about 50 leaders of the Pacific Symphony sedately sipped wine and sampled coconut chicken while they awaited their newly appointed musical director, Carl St. Clair, about to make his Orange County society debut. And they waited.
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