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Saddleback Unified School District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA
A $202,000 contract with the Saddleback Unified School District to provide recreation programs has been approved by the City Council. Under the contract, which is up $52,000 from last year, the school district will provide youth activities programs year-round. The increase will pay for new programs and includes $15,000 to develop activities for disabled and special-needs children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parents of three children are suing the Ocean View School District in Huntington Beach, contending that school officials wrote a "glowing" recommendation for a teacher even though they suspected him of acting inappropriately around young boys. The 27-year-old teacher, Jason Abhyankar, went on to a position in the Saddleback Valley Unified School District and since has been charged with four criminal counts of molesting fourth-grade boys in both school districts. He has pleaded not guilty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992
The Saddleback Unified School District board tonight will discuss proposed budget cuts and fee increases that may be needed to close a projected $2.6-million deficit in the district's 1992-93 budget. One of the proposals to stem the flow of red ink would increase by 83% the fees parents pay to have their children bused. If the proposal is given final approval by the board in May, busing fees would rise from $150 to $274 per child for an annual pass, and from $75 to $137 for a semester pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a trailer came to take the horses away, school officials realized that the little farm at Trabuco Elementary School houses a lot more than gentle pigs, hissing geese, chewing goats and a rabble of chickens. It's also home to the Trabuco Canyon community's sense of itself as a rural paradise, where folks do things differently than in the rest of fast-paced Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992
Perhaps at least as significant as the winning of a $250,000 sexual harassment suit by a former Mission Viejo high school teacher ("O.C. Teacher Wins $250,000 for Harassment," Feb. 22) were some of the comments of the defense attorney for the Saddleback Unified School District. In defending why the teacher had been involuntarily transferred, the attorney maintained "that more students dropped out of her (chemistry) classes than from other teachers' and she consistently gave out lower grades, indicating that she didn't properly motivate her pupils."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989
Three students from Saddleback Unified School District took first place this week in the National History Day contest at the University of Maryland, school officials said. The team had prepared a project on Jane Addams, the founder of Chicago's Hull House and winner of the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize for her part in such actions as enactment of child labor laws. The winners were Kate Staiger and Laurel Gorman, seventh-grade students at La Paz Intermediate School, and Peter Marietta, an eighth-grader at Los Alisos Intermediate School, according to teacher Michael O'Neill, who coordinated the school district's History Day entries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1986
Channon Phipps, an 11-year-old hemophiliac from El Toro, took a blood test last August that revealed he had AIDS antibodies in his blood. But he does not have AIDS. Channon's aunt and legal guardian, Deborha Phipps, filed a lawsuit three months later demanding that her nephew be permitted to attend class at the Rancho Canada Elementary School in the Saddleback Valley Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1989
Parents worried about their children's safety persuaded the Saddleback Unified School District board Tuesday night to postpone any cutbacks in free bus transportation until at least the fall. However, the board voted to reconsider the same plan, at a meeting April 4, for the school year beginning in September. Board members also said Tuesday that reducing the bus service now would interrupt students' schedules and would cause confusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994
Regarding Christian ideology and the upcoming South County school board elections, letter writer M.S. Smith (Oct. 16) makes two erroneous assumptions that bear correction. First, Smith states, "South Orange County is dominated by conservative Christians, so what's wrong with a board of similar values?" Here's what's wrong with it. Contrary to Smith's contention that an extremist and a conservative are one and the same, informed voters realize that what separates a religious right extremist from a mainstream conservative believer is the extremist's belief that our government should enforce scriptural law and the extremist's willingness to subvert the democratic process to achieve this goal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1989 | LUCILLE RENWICK, Times Staff Writer
Suzanne Gomez is afraid for her two sons. The Portola Hills resident worries that the Saddleback Unified School District will make a decision at tonight's school board meeting that would mean that her teen-age sons would have to walk about 3.5 miles each day, down an unlit thoroughfare--bordered by a ravine and a bike path--to get to school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter A. Hartman, the superintendent who shaped Saddleback Valley Unified into a nationally respected school district, died in a South County hospital Saturday after a lengthy illness. During his 18 years at the helm, Hartman saw Saddleback add 12 new schools to deal with the overwhelming growth in South County. The district now includes 35,000 students at 36 schools, the fourth-largest in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What if your neighbors called you every time they saw your teenager running a red light? What if the bus driver greeted your child by name every morning? What if your family sat down to a healthful dinner at a beautifully set table every evening? What if sprawling, balkanized south Orange County were transformed into a giant, Norman Rockwell-style small town?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to decide which school official they should pick for their most prestigious professional award, delegates from 20 state regions of the Assn. of California School Administrators this week did something they've never done in 29 years of voting: They gave it to two people. Peter A. Hartman, superintendent of the Saddleback Unified School District, and James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
Stanford 9 test scores for Saddleback, La Habra and Magnolia school districts improved across the board from 1998's scores. The Saddleback Valley Unified School District posted strong scores for the second year running--with all districtwide marks beating the national average. The La Habra City School District saw modest increases, except among second graders, whose scores improved significantly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of persistent lobbying, two south Orange County school districts Thursday became the first in the state to win waivers that allow them to maintain unusual programs that teach children in both Spanish and English. The state Department of Education granted Las Palmas Elementary in Capistrano Unified School District and Gates Elementary in Saddleback Unified School District "alternative" school status.
NEWS
October 23, 1996 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Rancho Santa Margarita Intermediate School, one class uses volumes of the Encyclopaedia Britannica as paperweights. Here, kids who want to use an encyclopedia turn on one of the school's 275 computers and connect to Britannica Online via the Internet. Finding information is as quick as typing in a keyword, and the articles, though somewhat abbreviated, are updated monthly. The question of whether the Internet has a place in schools is already settled, says Principal Robert W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to decide which school official they should pick for their most prestigious professional award, delegates from 20 state regions of the Assn. of California School Administrators this week did something they've never done in 29 years of voting: They gave it to two people. Peter A. Hartman, superintendent of the Saddleback Unified School District, and James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge has overturned a $250,000 jury verdict awarded to a South County high school teacher who alleged that she had been sexually harassed by two school administrators. Judge William F. Rylaarsdam overturned the judgment late Friday after determining that the jury's decision was legally flawed, according to attorney James P. Collins Jr., who represented the administrators and Saddleback Unified School District in the case.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jenna Scherman, 10, never thought her fifth-grade year would be marred by something so strange and hard to understand as a bond crisis or that the word depressed would ever enter her vocabulary. But suddenly, her world has collided with the adult world, leaving her and her brother and sister--and 367 classmates--angry and in limbo. Jenna and her fellow students, as well as 14 teachers and the principal, learned this week that they had become victims of the Orange County bond fiasco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994
Regarding Christian ideology and the upcoming South County school board elections, letter writer M.S. Smith (Oct. 16) makes two erroneous assumptions that bear correction. First, Smith states, "South Orange County is dominated by conservative Christians, so what's wrong with a board of similar values?" Here's what's wrong with it. Contrary to Smith's contention that an extremist and a conservative are one and the same, informed voters realize that what separates a religious right extremist from a mainstream conservative believer is the extremist's belief that our government should enforce scriptural law and the extremist's willingness to subvert the democratic process to achieve this goal.
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