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Sadness

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
The order from the city desk to the reporter was direct: The 1992 riots were out of control, neighborhoods were going up in smoke. The reporter was to go to hot spots and get the story. Doing so meant suppressing his own anxieties about venturing into familiar neighborhoods suddenly transformed into chaotic danger zones. But he was armed with adrenaline. "This is what it's all about," the reporter later declared in a 1992 American Journalism Review article about journalists on the "firing line.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
The media have become fond in recent years of glamorizing stay-at-home moms as elite career women who have “opted out” of the workforce so they can put family first. Finally , the Pew Research Center has provided the reality check we've needed. “The share of mothers who do not work outside the home rose to 29% in 2012, up from a modern-era low of 23% in 1999,” Pew's new report finds. The primary reason: economics. The cost of child care and the lack of job opportunities are forcing women to stay at home rather than go back to work after having kids.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989
On reading Gregg Barrios' moving portrait of his long-lost heroine, Carol Ohmart, ("The Last Starlet," Jan. 1 and 8), I felt very moved--and very sad. But my sadness was not for Ohmart. The actress' scapegoats were anything and anyone within reach--she blamed her mother, the system, the Hollywood of the '50s, the producers. The real victim in this story of fading dreams and fallen stardom is the writer, Barrios. How let down he must have felt when he discovered that his childhood fantasy turned out to be anything but the pure beauty queen with a heart as golden as her yellow hair.
OPINION
March 29, 2014
Re "Tender care and a hard goodbye," Column One, March 24 Beautifully written article. R.I.P Kim Pham; we never knew you but feel that we did. Such a senseless death. Cecelia and Cliff Waeschle Beverly Hills ALSO: Letters: No lame ducks? Letters: Shuttering Exide Mailbag: The ABCs of the SAT
NEWS
December 16, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
NEWTOWN, Conn. - It was meant to be a day of mourning, but parishioners inside a Catholic Church here had their fears renewed Sunday when a bomb threat forced a mid-morning evacuation and a SWAT team converged and surrounded a rectory. The threat, which came during morning services, was “a menacing call that threatened to disrupt the Mass in a violent way,” said Brian Wallace, a spokesman for the local diocese. As parishioners filed out of St. Rose of Lima Church, there was a swell of raw emotion -- disappointment, distress, anger and sadness, Wallace said.
SPORTS
March 6, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
The wrestling community has reacted swiftly and sadly to the news of the death of William Moody, who played the Undertaker's wrestling manager, Paul Bearer. A sampling of the reaction follows: WWE star Triple H: "Rest in peace, Paul Bearer. You will never be forgotten. There will never be another. " WWE Hall of Famer Bret Hart: "Goodbye to a good friend, Paul Bearer. Say hi to Owen for me. " Michelle McCool (Undertaker's wife): "You always made me smile.
SPORTS
August 10, 2012 | By Mike Bianchi
ORLANDO - Sadness. That is all. Just sadness. Hollow, hopeless, heartbreaking sadness. That is what it feels like to be an Orlando Magic fan right now. Not anger. Not blame. Not even relief. Not now. Not when you are forced to say goodbye to Dwight Howard, the greatest player in your franchise's history, as he takes his talents to Hollywood. As one of my buddies from Ohio tweeted Thursday: "Dear Orlando, We Understand. Sincerely, Cleveland. " How did "The Happiest Place on Earth" become the saddest sports city in America?
MAGAZINE
March 10, 1996
"Praise and Thanks" (by Andrew Asch, So SoCal, Feb. 4) notes that former Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated "last December," when the sad event actually took place and remains imbedded in our minds as Nov. 4. Talar Toprakjian Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
After watching New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie emote for two hours in a nationally televised news conference Thursday, we still don't know why his minions decided to wreak havoc on thousands of commuters last September. We don't know what the true toll of human suffering was. We don't know why the governor accepted his staffers' denials at face value. We don't know why he was satisfied with the answer that a “traffic study” was to blame for the nightmare that ensued when lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge from Fort Lee, N.J., were closed for three days.
NEWS
December 30, 1999
The Liu family story ("Silent Pain," Dec. 21) is a sad one on two fronts: the death of their son, Charlie, and the belief that their daughter was not significant enough to be a part of their lives except for her possible usefulness as a bone marrow donor. DIANA L. JUE Rolling Hills Estates Via e-mail
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
As thoroughbreds were groomed and prepped for the day's races, a group of elderly Japanese Americans circled the stables of Santa Anita in a tram. For six months in 1942, they lived here, in the same stalls where horses had slept, before being shipped to internment camps in isolated areas of the country. Back then, arriving adults mourned the loss of homes and businesses, while children explored the grounds, making new friends. In the barns, a thin layer of asphalt was all that separated families from layers of manure.
SPORTS
March 24, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
For much of our adult lives, the Lakers have been the toast of the town. That's why the anguish is so understandable now that they are merely toast. But in the midst of all the noise, have we not missed some of the more salient points? Are we so engrossed in our need for instant gratification that we cannot look beyond the most recent tweet? Even as we dissect everything about the Lakers as if they were biology-class frogs, aren't we getting off track a bit? There is no intention here of being an apologist.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
Maybe the Muppets weren't such a good idea. Toyota, for those who missed the Super Bowl ad, has enlisted the help of Jim Henson's finest to sell its all-new Highlander SUV. This would be a hoot except for one awkward fact: This thing holds Muppets a lot better than actual people. The new Highlander has less head- and legroom in the third row than the previous generation model. In fact, it has less space back there than nearly all of its SUV and crossover rivals. That's disappointing, particularly because the outside of the Highlander is actually about 3 inches longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Got discerning taste? Interested in digging in the digital crates for the best music available in the cloud? Then you've no doubt been targeted by Beats Music in the past few months. The much-hyped streaming service is the latest entry in an increasingly crowded field that includes Spotify and iTunes. It offers access to millions of songs and hundreds of hand-selected playlists for $9.99 a month (or, for ATT customers, $14.99 for a family plan). It was unveiled last month during a big budget rollout by longtime music business executives and hitmakers Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine through their company, Beats Electronics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Lena Dunham is even more of a New Yorker than you might think. Los Angeles, in fact, makes her "very sad. " And she's not even considering the traffic. The "Girls" creator and star and quintessential Big Apple millennial graces the February cover of Vogue, and photographed by Annie Liebovitz, girlfriend looks good . And she's spilling some dish in the accompanying interview as well. Turns out Dunham hits L.A. for a few weeks each fall to edit one season of the show and brainstorm for the next, working with exec producers Judd Apatow and Jenni Konner, who have families in the Southland.
OPINION
January 11, 2014
The tragic story of Jahi McMath - the 13-year-old girl who was declared brain dead after undergoing surgery last month and whose parents insist on keeping attached to life support - is that rare news event with absolutely no positive angle, no silver lining. Similarly, the experience of reading and editing the letters on the story was gut-wrenching. A few readers had nasty comments for the parents (their letters didn't run), and others directed their anger at the lawyers and other interests seeking to influence Jahi's family.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006
THIS is an age in which disasters occupy our media on a constant basis ["Dane Cook, Pain-Free Comedian," Sept. 3]. In contrast to that, Cook puts a truly funny, fresh, positive twist on the "little things" of life. Die of an overdose and you're a hero. Live a good life and share joy in a world of sadness, and you get no respect. Go drink your sorrows away huddled in a corner with a Bukowski novel, and leave comedy critiquing to people who understand what it's like to laugh. CARL KOZLOWSKI Pasadena
SPORTS
July 11, 1987
Although feeling sadness reading of the death of Broadway Billy Schuster, the old Angel shortstop, it brought back many pleasant memories of an excellent ballplayer who could still put fun into the game. Many a time he would score standing up, then run past both catcher and umpire and halfway up the screen behind home plate at Wrigley Field, breaking up everyone at the park. Many thanks, Bill, both for great plays at shortstop and for great fun, too. JUDD SCHENCK Capistrano Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
After watching New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie emote for two hours in a nationally televised news conference Thursday, we still don't know why his minions decided to wreak havoc on thousands of commuters last September. We don't know what the true toll of human suffering was. We don't know why the governor accepted his staffers' denials at face value. We don't know why he was satisfied with the answer that a “traffic study” was to blame for the nightmare that ensued when lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge from Fort Lee, N.J., were closed for three days.
OPINION
January 5, 2014 | By Becky Aikman
When the Crawley clan of "Downton Abbey" returns to American television this weekend, I will take more than a sporting interest in the fate of the newly widowed Lady Mary. As someone who was widowed at a relatively young age myself, my fondest hope is this: that she will be no lady. Perhaps she can help the rest of us sort out what constitutes proper behavior for a woman whose husband has died. Being a widow is one of the few female roles for which social norms still lag in a bygone era, reinforced by literature and popular culture.
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