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Sadoun Hammadi

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March 24, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Saddam Hussein shook up the top levels of his beleaguered Iraqi government Saturday, giving up one of his own titles to Sadoun Hammadi, a trusted Shiite, but showing no sign of personally bending to the insurgencies sweeping the war-wrecked country. The key moves announced in a midafternoon Baghdad Radio broadcast named Hammadi prime minister and sheared Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz of his portfolio.
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NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi regime launched a political and diplomatic campaign Monday that sounded like a plea for relief from the effects of economic sanctions and from the threat of renewed U.S. air attacks on its military installations. Prime Minister Sadoun Hammadi, in a news conference, pledged his country's full cooperation with U.N.
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NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi regime launched a political and diplomatic campaign Monday that sounded like a plea for relief from the effects of economic sanctions and from the threat of renewed U.S. air attacks on its military installations. Prime Minister Sadoun Hammadi, in a news conference, pledged his country's full cooperation with U.N.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Saddam Hussein shook up the top levels of his beleaguered Iraqi government Saturday, giving up one of his own titles to Sadoun Hammadi, a trusted Shiite, but showing no sign of personally bending to the insurgencies sweeping the war-wrecked country. The key moves announced in a midafternoon Baghdad Radio broadcast named Hammadi prime minister and sheared Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz of his portfolio.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
IRAQI Deputy Prime Minister Sadoun Hammadi arrived in IRAN to conduct the first face-to-face talks between the two former adversary nations since the Gulf War began. ALGERIAN, FRENCH and YEMENI officials also traveled to Tehran for talks. After meeting with SAUDI ARABIA'S King Fahd, EGYPTIAN President Hosni Mubarak affirmed that Egypt's 45,000 troops in the Gulf would not be used to strike Iraq.
NEWS
August 10, 1991
Iraq rejected a draft U.N. resolution that would let it sell a limited amount of oil to buy food and medical supplies. "The draft resolution does not provide the financial resources, even at a minimal level, to meet the needs of our people," the Iraqi News Agency quoted Prime Minister Sadoun Hammadi as saying. The draft would allow the sale of up to $1.6 billion worth of embargoed Iraqi oil over six months.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | Associated Press
The Iraqi offer to withdraw from Kuwait broadcast over Baghdad Radio came from the Revolutionary Command Council. What is it? POWER. The council is an elite body that makes the most important decisions in Iraq. It is led by President Saddam Hussein, and acts as an inner Cabinet. It is ranked above Hussein's regular 25-member Cabinet. MAKEUP. Hussein is chairman, and members include these deputies: --Izzat Ibrahim, vice chairman since 1979. On paper, he is the second in command.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | From Associated Press
Iraq's offer to withdraw from Kuwait was widely welcomed in the Arab world today, although the attached conditions prompted caution in several capitals. Jordan's information minister, Ibrahim Izzeddine, said the statement marked the first time Iraq has declared its readiness to abide by the initial U.N. Security Council resolution demanding its withdrawal from Kuwait. In Saudia Arabia, host to most of the allied troops fighting Iraq, one government official said he prefers to see what developed.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | From Reuters
Motorcades of coffins carrying Saddam Hussein's Gulf War dead are streaming to the Iraqi holy city of Najaf, refugees from Kuwait report. Jordanian Amina Madi said she saw at least 200 coffins of military and civilian dead stacked on vehicles that stopped to refuel in the southern Iraqi city at midweek. Najaf, about 100 miles south of Baghdad on the Euphrates River, is one of the holiest cities for Shiite Muslims, who form the majority in Iraq.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iranian government Thursday told a top aide to President Saddam Hussein that Tehran will hold Iraqi pilots as well as the planes they flew to Iran until the Persian Gulf War is over, Iran's official news agency reported. Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati, meeting in the Iranian capital with Sadoun Hammadi, an Iraqi deputy prime minister, expressed displeasure that Iraqi warplanes had landed without seeking permission of the Tehran government, the Islamic Republic News Agency said.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq's ruling Revolutionary Command Council has turned over some of President Saddam Hussein's powers to the new Cabinet, the official news agency reported Tuesday. The move could put more authority in the hands of Sadoun Hammadi, a Shiite Muslim and Arab Baath Socialist Party veteran whom Hussein named prime minister late last month, surrendering one of his leadership titles.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Saddam Hussein escalated the Persian Gulf broadcast battle for world opinion today, announcing through aides that he has taped a reply to President Bush's speech on Iraqi television and wants it aired on American TV. The Iraqi president also told a Turkish newspaper that his country can fight for years and "could hurt" America. Iraq's ambassador to Washington, Mohammed Mashat, relayed the request to the State Department. Assistant Secretary of State John Kelly told him the U.S.
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