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OPINION
August 19, 2004
Muqtada Sadr's agreement Wednesday to withdraw his militia from the holy shrine of Imam Ali in Najaf leaves him at the peak of his popularity and with the ability to fight another day. He has become a nightmare not just for the U.S. occupation forces but also for the interim Iraqi government of Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, which has talked tough but acted weak. The battles of Sadr's Mahdi militia against U.S.
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WORLD
September 12, 2011 | By Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
Anti-American cleric Muqtada Sadr called on followers not to launch attacks on U.S. troops who are scheduled to leave Iraq by the end of the year, but warned that the violence would resume if they were not gone. Sadr's statement comes as U.S. and Iraqi officials are considering a plan to keep a small number of American troops in the country. More than 40,000 U.S. troops are in Iraq, but under an agreement between Iraq and the Bush administration in 2008, virtually all should leave by the end of 2011.
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WORLD
March 30, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr on Saturday rejected Iraqi government orders for his supporters to disarm, and a round-the-clock curfew in the capital was extended indefinitely as the bloody standoff between Shiite militiamen and Iraqi and U.S. forces showed no signs of abating. Militiamen on rooftops battled Iraqi soldiers and U.S. special forces in the southern city of Basra, where at least 22 "criminal fighters" were killed Saturday, the U.S. military said.
WORLD
July 27, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
In an illustration of its growing muscle in Iraq as U.S. influence wanes, anti-American cleric Muqtada Sadr's movement has won pardons for at least 50 prisoners jailed for crimes including murder, kidnapping and attacks on U.S. troops. The amnesties come at a time when U.S. forces remaining in Iraq have faced an increased number of attacks, many by Shiite Muslim militias associated with the Sadr movement. And they have angered some senior Iraqi officials, who charge that the law is being applied selectively and bent to fit a hidden political agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1997 | BRETT ANTHONY COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A memorial service will be held today for Babak Sadr, a UCLA instructor, author and innovative electrical engineer. Sadr died Jan. 23 of lymphatic cancer at Westlake Village Selic House Cancer Institute. He was 33. Raised in Tehran, Iran, Sadr was a whiz kid whose family arrived in the United States in 1977. They settled in Agoura Hills two years later. At age 19, Sadr worked at the NASA research center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence project.
OPINION
July 30, 2004
In "The Hawks and the Doves Are Aflutter Over U.S. Iran Policy" (Commentary, July 23), William Beeman says that I initiated the accusation of links between Iran and Muqtada Sadr. He accuses me of political spin. I originated nothing. Such links were discussed widely by both Iraqi officials and ordinary people. Iranian pilgrims visiting shrines in Karbala and Najaf spoke openly about Iranian support for some insurgents, as did some Iranian journalists. On April 6, the Italian military intelligence agency concluded that Iran funded Sadr and other insurgent leaders to the tune of $70 million monthly.
WORLD
June 28, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Mohammad and his gang are back. There may not be a Glock semiautomatic strapped to his waist anymore, but the terrifying mystique of the Mahdi Army still shrouds the Shiite Muslim militiaman like the menacing black uniform he once wore. Civil servant Haidar Naji remembers how Mohammad used to strut around his east Baghdad neighborhood like a mob boss, ordering him not to wear Bermuda shorts, too immodest and Western for his Islamic tastes. Naji changed into longer pants.
WORLD
April 25, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
After a follower of Shiite cleric Muqtada Sadr vowed to dispatch militia members to defend Iraqi mosques in the wake of a series of deadly bombings, a statement from Sadr that was widely distributed Saturday made it clear that the Mahdi Army would be reactivated only if the government accepted the offer. The militia's fighters, who were involved in the bloody sectarian violence of Iraq's civil war, were demobilized in 2008 after major confrontations between Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's government and the armed group.
WORLD
May 13, 2008 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of Iraq's main Shiite Muslim factions signed a deal Monday clearing the way for Iraqi soldiers to operate throughout Sadr City, a vast Baghdad slum that is largely under the control of militiamen loyal to firebrand cleric Muqtada Sadr. The signatures put an official seal to a truce brokered over the weekend by Sadr's political representatives and members of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's governing alliance.
WORLD
August 27, 2004 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
The young fighter, barely a man, clutched his assault rifle, perhaps for the last time. He did not seem disappointed. "We want a solution," said Mustafa Karim, 20, one of dozens of militiamen who were preparing to disarm this morning upon the apparent orders of their leader, rebel Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr. "God willing, we have a solution."
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
Wave after wave of Iraqi men stamped their feet and their hands swung high as they marched in time, dressed in the red, black and white of their nation's flag. Each group of 100 goose-stepped, carrying a white placard that read "God is great" and gave their unit's number. It was the most organized and disciplined display of street power in the eight-year existence of Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr's grass-roots movement, drawing by some estimates 100,000 people into Baghdad's streets.
WORLD
March 4, 2011 | By Alice Fordham, Los Angeles Times
Former Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, whose Iraqiya party won the most seats in Iraq's elections last year, has refused to head a long-planned strategic council in parliament, saying Thursday that Prime Minister Nouri Maliki has broken promises about its role. In an interview on Iraqi TV, Allawi alleged that he was being watched by intelligence services and said that he would not head the proposed National Council for Strategic Policies. The council, backed by the United States, was conceived as a counterweight to the power of the prime minister to end the months-long deadlock on forming a government.
WORLD
January 21, 2011 | A Times Staff Writer
Anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada Sadr, who arrived in Iraq this month after spending nearly four years away, has returned to Iran, two aides from his office said Friday on condition of anonymity. Sadr left Iraq Thursday or Friday, the aides said, adding that it was not clear whether his return to Iran was temporary or permanent. In early 2007, Sadr, who had influenced many Shiite Muslims in Iraq to oppose American forces after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, moved to Iran to focus on his religious studies, with the goal of advancing in Shiite Islam's religious hierarchy.
WORLD
January 10, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Even as supporters of firebrand Shiite cleric Muqtada Sadr rejoiced at his return to Iraq, some in the country's Shiite Muslim majority population expressed alarm Sunday about the implications of his homecoming. In Baghdad and the southern provinces of Basra and Maysan, the news gave deep pause to some Shiite Iraqis, mindful of Iraq's history since 2003 and wondering whether Sadr would once more spark violent confrontations, or whether he had in fact truly evolved. Sadr came home last week from Iran, where he had gone in 2007 after his Mahdi Army militia had engaged in years of fighting with American troops and had been blamed for some of Iraq's worst sectarian violence.
WORLD
January 9, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Saad Fakhrildeen and Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
His beard now flecked with gray, Muqtada Sadr studied the thousands of faithful who pushed and jostled one another Saturday, craning their necks for a glimpse of the mysterious cleric they hadn't seen in person in nearly four years. In his first appearance in this holy city since returning to Iraq three days before, the firebrand Shiite Muslim preacher faced a defining moment: how to harness his followers, whose wild energy he had ridden until his organization spiraled out of control during Iraq's civil war. If his old speeches had been warlike, urging rebellion against the Americans, his tone Saturday was measured and controlled, acknowledging the harshness of Iraq's war in the streets and the suffering of all Iraqis.
WORLD
January 5, 2011 | By Saad Fakhrildeen, Ned Parker and Salar Jaff, Los Angeles Times
In the latest example of waning American influence in Iraq, anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr returned home from Iran, where he had gone in 2007 after his Shiite Muslim militia engaged in years of on-and-off battles with U.S. troops and was blamed for some of the country's worst sectarian violence. Sadr's surprise homecoming comes months after his supporters won 40 seats in the Iraqi parliament, allowing the Iranian-backed cleric to play a decisive role in Prime Minister Nouri Maliki securing a new term late last year after a lengthy period of political deadlock.
WORLD
June 15, 2008 | Ned Parker and Saif Rasheed, Times Staff Writers
Iraqi security forces began to move into the southern city of Amarah on Saturday, and residents braced for the latest government offensive against the Mahdi Army militia loyal to Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr. Amarah, the capital of Maysan province, is one of the remaining bastions of the Sadr movement in Iraq. The cleric's followers control the governing council and his militia is dominant in the streets.
WORLD
January 21, 2011 | A Times Staff Writer
Anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada Sadr, who arrived in Iraq this month after spending nearly four years away, has returned to Iran, two aides from his office said Friday on condition of anonymity. Sadr left Iraq Thursday or Friday, the aides said, adding that it was not clear whether his return to Iran was temporary or permanent. In early 2007, Sadr, who had influenced many Shiite Muslims in Iraq to oppose American forces after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, moved to Iran to focus on his religious studies, with the goal of advancing in Shiite Islam's religious hierarchy.
OPINION
November 30, 2010
An uphill battle Re "How steep is too steep?" Nov. 27 This article is a wakeup call to financially assist the Angels Flight railway in downtown L.A. When Los Angeles had a vast network of rail transit, including streetcars downtown, the merchants were happy to provide tokens to shoppers to lure them downtown. The same method could be used today to help offset the high costs of operating Angels Flight. At its original 3rd Street location, when rides were 5 cents apiece, residents and merchants alike used Angels Flight daily.
WORLD
November 25, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr, whose feared militia was crushed by Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki two years ago, has leveraged support for his former enemy's government into renewed influence over the country's security forces, governors' offices and even its prisons. In recent months, Maliki's government has freed hundreds of controversial members of the Shiite Muslim cleric's Mahdi Army and handed security positions to veteran commanders of the militia, which was blamed for some of the most disturbing violence in the country's civil war and insurgency against U.S. forces.
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