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Sadr City Iraq

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WORLD
November 1, 2006 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki ordered U.S. and Iraqi forces Tuesday to remove roadblocks enclosing a vast Shiite Muslim neighborhood that is part of his power base and a suspected source of death squads. Soon after, U.S. forces withdrew from checkpoints that had restricted movement in and around Sadr City since last week, when troops began searching for a missing American soldier and hunting for a death-squad leader.
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WORLD
October 22, 2007 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
U.S. forces engaged in an hours-long gun battle with militants during an early-morning raid in the Iraqi capital's Shiite Muslim district of Sadr City on Sunday. American officials said as many as 49 people were killed in the fighting. The Iraqi government said many of the victims were civilians and protested the action. The American military said that all of those killed were "criminals." A freelance correspondent for The Times said he saw the corpses of a woman and two small children.
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WORLD
March 17, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Residents of the Shiite neighborhood of Sadr City on Friday showed signs of growing resentment toward the presence of U.S. troops in the area, chanting "No occupation!" and "No America!" in a march demanding the removal of a U.S. base there. The protest came as U.S. military officials cited Sadr City, stronghold of anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr, as a success story in a month-old effort to improve security in Baghdad.
WORLD
March 17, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Residents of the Shiite neighborhood of Sadr City on Friday showed signs of growing resentment toward the presence of U.S. troops in the area, chanting "No occupation!" and "No America!" in a march demanding the removal of a U.S. base there. The protest came as U.S. military officials cited Sadr City, stronghold of anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr, as a success story in a month-old effort to improve security in Baghdad.
WORLD
March 16, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
The mayor of the Shiite stronghold of Sadr City narrowly escaped an assassination attempt Thursday, less than two weeks after negotiations he led with U.S. military officials cleared the way for American troops to move into the area. Also Thursday, four American soldiers died when two roadside bombs exploded in quick succession in east Baghdad, the U.S. military said. It also announced the death of a Marine on Wednesday in the western province of Al Anbar.
WORLD
October 26, 2006 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
U.S.-led forces battled gunmen in Sadr City during two rare forays into the vast Shiite Muslim slum Wednesday, killing at least 10 people and drawing a swift rebuke from Iraq's prime minister. The American troops, who called in airstrikes as they came under attack, were searching for a kidnapped U.S. soldier and hunting for a Shiite death-squad leader, authorities said. The U.S. military said in a statement that the action had been authorized by the Iraqi government.
WORLD
September 26, 2005 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Fawzi Salman was asleep on his roof in the midnight heat when he was startled awake by something he had not heard in a year: American gunfire in Sadr City. It had been that long since U.S. troops and black-clad militiamen battled in the alleys of the huge Baghdad slum. Since then, it had become one of the calmest places in a city of daily car bombs -- and a multimillion-dollar showcase of the U.S. reconstruction program.
WORLD
October 22, 2007 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
U.S. forces engaged in an hours-long gun battle with militants during an early-morning raid in the Iraqi capital's Shiite Muslim district of Sadr City on Sunday. American officials said as many as 49 people were killed in the fighting. The Iraqi government said many of the victims were civilians and protested the action. The American military said that all of those killed were "criminals." A freelance correspondent for The Times said he saw the corpses of a woman and two small children.
WORLD
March 13, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Muqtada Sadr's expanding web of power starts right here, on the teeming streets of a neighborhood in northeastern Baghdad named after his assassinated father and uncle. It begins with charities and public services, such as subsidized cooking fuel, street cleaning and soccer games for the aimless boys of the Shiite Muslim ghetto.
WORLD
March 5, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Just after 8 a.m. Sunday, U.S. and Iraqi troops tapped on Saif Mirwan's front gate in the Shiite Muslim stronghold of Sadr City and politely asked to search his house. They looked in each room, asked how his family was doing, checked out the pigeons he keeps on his roof and then left with handshakes and a thank you. With that, Sadr City, whose fearsome reputation and political clout had rendered it largely off-limits to U.S.
WORLD
March 16, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
The mayor of the Shiite stronghold of Sadr City narrowly escaped an assassination attempt Thursday, less than two weeks after negotiations he led with U.S. military officials cleared the way for American troops to move into the area. Also Thursday, four American soldiers died when two roadside bombs exploded in quick succession in east Baghdad, the U.S. military said. It also announced the death of a Marine on Wednesday in the western province of Al Anbar.
WORLD
March 5, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Just after 8 a.m. Sunday, U.S. and Iraqi troops tapped on Saif Mirwan's front gate in the Shiite Muslim stronghold of Sadr City and politely asked to search his house. They looked in each room, asked how his family was doing, checked out the pigeons he keeps on his roof and then left with handshakes and a thank you. With that, Sadr City, whose fearsome reputation and political clout had rendered it largely off-limits to U.S.
WORLD
November 1, 2006 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki ordered U.S. and Iraqi forces Tuesday to remove roadblocks enclosing a vast Shiite Muslim neighborhood that is part of his power base and a suspected source of death squads. Soon after, U.S. forces withdrew from checkpoints that had restricted movement in and around Sadr City since last week, when troops began searching for a missing American soldier and hunting for a death-squad leader.
WORLD
October 26, 2006 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
U.S.-led forces battled gunmen in Sadr City during two rare forays into the vast Shiite Muslim slum Wednesday, killing at least 10 people and drawing a swift rebuke from Iraq's prime minister. The American troops, who called in airstrikes as they came under attack, were searching for a kidnapped U.S. soldier and hunting for a Shiite death-squad leader, authorities said. The U.S. military said in a statement that the action had been authorized by the Iraqi government.
WORLD
March 13, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Muqtada Sadr's expanding web of power starts right here, on the teeming streets of a neighborhood in northeastern Baghdad named after his assassinated father and uncle. It begins with charities and public services, such as subsidized cooking fuel, street cleaning and soccer games for the aimless boys of the Shiite Muslim ghetto.
WORLD
September 26, 2005 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Fawzi Salman was asleep on his roof in the midnight heat when he was startled awake by something he had not heard in a year: American gunfire in Sadr City. It had been that long since U.S. troops and black-clad militiamen battled in the alleys of the huge Baghdad slum. Since then, it had become one of the calmest places in a city of daily car bombs -- and a multimillion-dollar showcase of the U.S. reconstruction program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009
The Defense Department last week identified the following American military personnel who died in Afghanistan and Iraq, or who died of their injuries at a military hospital: Roger L. Adams Jr., 36, of Jacksonville, N.C.; sergeant, Army National Guard. Adams was among four guardsmen killed Monday when a roadside bomb exploded near their vehicle in Baghdad. He was assigned to the 120th Combined Arms Battalion in Wilmington, N.C. Juan C. Baldeosingh, 30, of Newport, N.C.
NEWS
January 18, 2009 | Kate Linthicum
On the night of Dec. 28, Tony Gonzales sat down at his home computer in Newman, Calif. to write his only son an e-mail. TJ was serving his first tour of duty in Iraq, and his father wanted to tell him that their beloved Dallas Cowboys had just lost a game. There was a knock at the door. Two Army officers stood there, under the porch light. "I could see the uniforms and the medals," Gonzales said. "I wanted to barricade the door. I just said to myself, 'No, no, no, it can't be.' " The officers had come to tell Gonzales and his wife, Marlynn, that their son, Spc. Tony J. Gonzales, 20, had been killed earlier that day in Sadr City, Iraq, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.
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