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Sadr City

WORLD
July 22, 2009 | Ned Parker and Saif Hameed, Hameed is a Times staff writer.
Bombs killed 19 people and wounded 80 across Iraq in a flurry of attacks Tuesday, three weeks after the U.S. military completed its withdrawal from the cities. At least six explosions struck both Shiite and Sunni neighborhoods in Baghdad. The Baghdad attacks, including two in the Sadr City district, resulted in 14 deaths. Some Sadr City residents blamed splinter factions of Shiite cleric Muqtada Sadr's Mahdi Army militia for the attacks.
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WORLD
June 30, 2009 | Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
At a moment of triumph, Prime Minister Nouri Maliki stood before a room full of reporters recently and publicly fretted about Iraq's future. After six years, U.S. troops were completing their withdrawal from Iraqi cities, the first step toward their complete departure by the end of 2011. The prime minister has declared today's deadline a holiday. And yet, Maliki acknowledged: "The challenge isn't finished. . . . What country in the world has such terrorist attacks?"
WORLD
June 25, 2009 | Saif Hameed and Ned Parker
A bomb in a sprawling Shiite Muslim neighborhood of Baghdad killed at least 72 people Wednesday and wounded more than 135, highlighting the danger of Iraq slipping back into violence after the deadline for U.S. combat troops to leave its cities -- now less than a week away. It was unclear who was responsible for the bomb, which was hidden in a motorcycle with a vegetable cart attached.
WORLD
April 30, 2009 | Saif Hameed and Liz Sly
Five car bombs ripped through neighborhoods across Baghdad late Wednesday, killing at least 48 people, wounding scores more and further raising concerns that a new wave of violence is threatening the security gains of the last 18 months. The bombings came after the deaths of nearly 160 people in a 24-hour period late last week marked the worst surge of violence in a year.
WORLD
November 10, 2008 | Ned Parker, Parker is a Times staff writer.
The Mahdi Army fighter gets nervous every time he passes an Iraqi army checkpoint in Sadr City. He has even shaved his beard, a sign of his piety and his fealty to the Shiite Muslim militia, so the soldiers won't recognize him. "I am hunted. I can't stay home. The neighbors are informing on us," 28-year-old Bassem said at a recent rally for his leader, cleric Muqtada Sadr. Using a derogatory term for the Iraqi army, he added, "Four times, the dirty division has raided my house."
WORLD
November 10, 2008 | Tina Susman, Susman is a Times staff writer
"What's it like there?" It's the question we get asked most often by people who haven't been to Baghdad, followed closely by, "Do you live in the Green Zone?" The answer to that one is easy: No. The answer to the first is more difficult. Baghdad, like any big city, is a porridge of ugliness, beauty, charm, humor, scowls, color and grayness, but with a twist: It is under military occupation, and signs of U.S. and Iraq security forces are everywhere.
WORLD
October 19, 2008 | Ned Parker and Usama Redha, Times Staff Writers
Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr warned Iraqi lawmakers that approving a U.S. troop agreement would be tantamount to a betrayal of the Iraqi people, as his supporters rallied Saturday against the deal. As many as 20,000 protesters shouted, "No, no, America!" in a visceral display of the deep apprehension among Iraqis over the security pact that would extend the U.S. military presence in Iraq after a United Nations mandate expires in December.
WORLD
October 18, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Come to Sadr City and follow the children, the one hauling flour on his donkey, the one collecting garbage on his tractor, the two brothers with bowl haircuts and greasy hands hoisting mufflers and car batteries in the late morning heat. A lot of kids here can't tell you what 6 x 3 is. They can't read. They have no time to play. They work from dawn until after the moon is high. They are children in size only.
WORLD
October 10, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Clashes between Shiite Muslim militants and U.S. and Iraqi troops erupted in east Baghdad on Thursday night when groups loyal to anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr accused Washington of orchestrating the assassination of a popular lawmaker. An official at Iraq's Interior Ministry said Sadr's Mahdi Army militiamen fought with U.S.
WORLD
August 23, 2008 | Tina Susman and Caesar Ahmed, Times Staff Writers
The debate over a deal that would chart the future of U.S. troops in Iraq has reignited the rhetoric coming from Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr, who denounced the plan Friday for not setting a firm date for American withdrawal. Sadr's opposition to the draft of the agreement, which must be approved by Iraq's parliament, is a reminder of his potential to create headaches for Prime Minister Nouri Maliki. The draft would have U.S. troops leave Iraq by the end of 2011, if security conditions permit.
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