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NEWS
January 16, 1994 | JIM MULVANEY, NEWSDAY
When Rosemary Antonocchi is talking business, she talks tough. An assistant district attorney in charge of Dade County's robbery squad, she is conversant in firearms and street talk, and in the salty language of a squad room. But when she talks about "real life" outside the office, she sounds timid. "I won't fill my car up with gas at night because that is a high-risk activity," she says. "At a gas station, you are at very high risk. I avoid having to go out at night alone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2012 | By Lee Romney and Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Capt. Zoe Bedell graduated at the top of her Marine Corps officer candidates class. In deployments to Afghanistan, she oversaw "female engagement teams" that accompanied male infantry units into the field - living and working in identical conditions. Yet since 1994, the Defense Department has formally excluded women from most direct ground combat positions, creating a growing disconnect with the realities of warfare. Bedell said she left active duty last year because the policy limited her potential for promotion by failing to officially recognize her combat leadership experience.
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NEWS
May 29, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Clinton Administration predicted U.N. Security Council approval by next week, several impassioned ambassadors continued to balk Friday at the U.S.-European plan for safe areas for the Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
It started with a phone call from a neighbor at 4:30 a.m., jarring Maureen Goto awake at her seaside bed-and-breakfast in Hilo. "A tsunami's coming," the neighbor said. A little more than an hour later, civil defense sirens sounded in coastal areas across the state, triggering the evacuation of as many as 100,000 people and a tense day of waiting for a possible disaster. "They said, 'You have to go inland, and up,' " said Goto, whose 1930s-era mansion in Hilo, on the island of Hawaii, had already withstood tsunamis that twice devastated the town.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major move to strengthen its forces in Sarajevo, the United Nations dispatched hundreds of combat troops armed with heavy weapons to the besieged capital Sunday as rebel Serbs launched attacks across Bosnia. French tanks, British artillery and mechanized infantry were to be posted on strategic Mt. Igman overlooking the city by today. Their deployment followed an escalating barrage of Bosnian Serb attacks on peacekeepers and U.N.-designated "safe areas" in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Britain and France on Thursday that the allies' threat to launch air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina is the "last chance" for the U.N. peacekeeping force there and called for "a strong air response to raise the price of Serbian aggression." "You can't go about the world saying you're going to do something and then not do it," the President said at a news conference.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panicked residents of the eastern enclave of Zepa besieged U.N. posts and pleaded for the world's help Saturday as Bosnian government soldiers battled Serbian rebels threatening to overrun the U.N.-designated "safe area." Bosnian Serb troops, fresh from the capture of the nearby safe area of Srebrenica, shelled Zepa for a second day, and skirmishes were reported on the southwest edge of the Muslim enclave. U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1998
Let us remember with great remorse the town of Srebrenica (editorial, Dec. 4), not just for what happened there, but also for what we probably could have prevented. In 1993, the U.N. Security Council declared certain areas of Bosnia to be "safe areas," under U.N. protection. Thousands of civilians fled the ethnic cleansing, and they crowded into those areas, relying on the U.N. as their last line of defense. But then the word went out, particularly from the U.S., that the best course was for the UNPROFOR troops--23,000 in number--to withdraw from Bosnia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2004
I'd like to thank Lewis Segal for his article "Late for the Dance" [Aug. 8]. It served a wonderful purpose in bringing awareness to all of Los Angeles, even to our own dance community, of just how dire the situation is for support and funding. I am a local choreographer and Dance Resource Center board member. The situations Segal mentioned were well researched (yes, it is difficult to find affordable rehearsal space in safe areas) and accurate. And yes, the DRC is struggling to survive, but we are doing what other larger dance companies are doing, whittling down expenditures, making our mission more succinct, finding ways to maximize our services while minimizing our costs.
OPINION
August 11, 2003
I applaud the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services' move to establish protection for 53,000 acres of critical habitat at the Algodones Dunes, located in Imperial County (Aug. 7). The Algodones Dunes are a national treasure teeming with rare and unique forms of life found nowhere else on Earth. The incredible beauty of these dunes is primarily known to off-road enthusiasts and a growing number of hikers and backpackers, like myself, who make overnight trips into California's largest sand dunes.
OPINION
September 20, 2009 | Jenny Price, Jenny Price is a freelance writer and a research scholar at the UCLA Center for the Study of Women.
'Killing Shocks UC Irvine campus" ran the headline in this newspaper on Tuesday after a man allegedly shot his ex-wife to death. The article, which reported the slaying, focused at least as much on the shock in the community that such a thing could happen in a place like Irvine. I felt sad, of course, when I read it. I felt a twinge of despair. Shock, however? Not the least bit. Of course it happened. Twelve thousand people are shot to death in the U.S. every year -- accounting for more than two out of every three killings.
WORLD
October 15, 2004 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Two suicide bombers detonated explosives-laden backpacks Thursday inside the heavily barricaded Green Zone, killing at least six civilians -- including four Americans -- in the first suicide attacks within the area that houses the offices of the interim Iraqi government and the U.S. and British embassies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2004
I'd like to thank Lewis Segal for his article "Late for the Dance" [Aug. 8]. It served a wonderful purpose in bringing awareness to all of Los Angeles, even to our own dance community, of just how dire the situation is for support and funding. I am a local choreographer and Dance Resource Center board member. The situations Segal mentioned were well researched (yes, it is difficult to find affordable rehearsal space in safe areas) and accurate. And yes, the DRC is struggling to survive, but we are doing what other larger dance companies are doing, whittling down expenditures, making our mission more succinct, finding ways to maximize our services while minimizing our costs.
WORLD
March 24, 2004 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
A recent spate of attacks -- including a previously undisclosed mortar strike that killed a Bechtel Corp. subcontractor last Thursday -- has pierced the sense of security inside the U.S.-led coalition's well-protected Green Zone. The Iraqi construction worker, who was working at the San Francisco-based engineering giant's Baghdad compound when insurgents launched a daytime attack last week, is believed to be the first person killed in a shelling of the Green Zone since last fall.
OPINION
August 11, 2003
I applaud the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services' move to establish protection for 53,000 acres of critical habitat at the Algodones Dunes, located in Imperial County (Aug. 7). The Algodones Dunes are a national treasure teeming with rare and unique forms of life found nowhere else on Earth. The incredible beauty of these dunes is primarily known to off-road enthusiasts and a growing number of hikers and backpackers, like myself, who make overnight trips into California's largest sand dunes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2002 | ANTHONY McCARTNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Beverly Fancher spent an hour walking the five floors of the Long Beach courthouse, counting children left unattended in the hallways. She saw 60. Today, the first supervised Los Angeles County courthouse child-care waiting area will open, giving parents who have to appear in court a place to leave their children in comfort. The waiting room is a world apart from the courthouse corridors.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first evening in three months that the war stopped long enough for a sunset bicycle ride, Salih and Seherzade Samardzic decided in a wistful chat over their handlebars that they could accept peace at any price. "People want only to live. Everything else is secondary," said Salih Samardzic, 34, a carpet layer who has been out of work for over a year. "Whatever the politicians decide, the people will find some way to come together. No one is interested in politics anymore.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
It started with a phone call from a neighbor at 4:30 a.m., jarring Maureen Goto awake at her seaside bed-and-breakfast in Hilo. "A tsunami's coming," the neighbor said. A little more than an hour later, civil defense sirens sounded in coastal areas across the state, triggering the evacuation of as many as 100,000 people and a tense day of waiting for a possible disaster. "They said, 'You have to go inland, and up,' " said Goto, whose 1930s-era mansion in Hilo, on the island of Hawaii, had already withstood tsunamis that twice devastated the town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2002 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents in affluent coastal enclaves around Laguna Beach thought their neighborhoods were so safe they didn't need to lock their car doors or set their alarms. This proved a perfect opening, police said Friday, for a crime ring allegedly responsible for dozens of burglaries over the last few months. Authorities are still trying to determine how many burglaries can be linked to the ring.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2002 | Reuters
A congressional panel gave the nod last week to a bill that would set up a zone on the Internet free of violence, pornography or other material deemed inappropriate for children. The bill would direct the operator of the ".us" Internet domain to set up a ".kids" subdomain for Web sites targeting children younger than 13. Parents would find it easier to screen out sex or violence online by setting their browsers to view only Web sites with addresses ending in ".kids.us," said Rep.
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