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OPINION
January 14, 2013
In addition to the 3,000 deaths it causes each year, contaminated food is very expensive. The cost of food poisoning in this country comes to $14 billion a year, according to a July 2012 study published in the Journal of Food Protection, including the medical expenses of the 128,000 who are hospitalized annually. That figure does not include the millions of dollars that each food recall costs the company involved, the legal expenses from victims' lawsuits or losses incurred by other companies when consumers hear, for example, about contaminated cantaloupes and then avoid all cantaloupes, including those that are perfectly safe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
With the presidential inauguration days away, the Food and Drug Administration wants to assure us that the food to be eaten amidst all the pomp and circumstance won't give anyone a nasty case of food poisoning. “This week, at the request of the U.S. Secret Service and D.C. Department of Health, we've assembled a team of 35 FDA staff from across the U.S. including 18 experts in retail foods and field inspection,” FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said on the FDA blog .   “Their mission?
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OPINION
March 9, 2008
Re "Making food safe," editorial, March 4 America enjoys the safest food supply in the world, but the recent beef recall and other incidents have raised consumer concerns about our nation's food safety net. Last year, the Grocery Manufacturers Assn. released its "Four Pillars of Imported Food Safety" proposal, which calls on federal agencies to focus on prevention as the essential weapon against food-borne illnesses. As part of this approach, we believe the Food and Drug Administration must be given the resources to fulfill its critical food safety mission, including a doubling of its current budget.
OPINION
January 14, 2013
In addition to the 3,000 deaths it causes each year, contaminated food is very expensive. The cost of food poisoning in this country comes to $14 billion a year, according to a July 2012 study published in the Journal of Food Protection, including the medical expenses of the 128,000 who are hospitalized annually. That figure does not include the millions of dollars that each food recall costs the company involved, the legal expenses from victims' lawsuits or losses incurred by other companies when consumers hear, for example, about contaminated cantaloupes and then avoid all cantaloupes, including those that are perfectly safe.
OPINION
January 9, 2011 | By Nicolette Hahn Niman
Our holiday table got quite tense. We are a mixed family ? Jewish, Christian, Republican, Democrat ?? but the tension wasn't from differences over religion or politics. It was about food. At one end of the table sat my husband's nephew, who runs a food bank. He's an earnest man who spends his days seeking nourishment for the hungry, and favors almost anything that increases food's availability or lowers its price. My husband and I occupied the other end. We operate a pasture-based ranch, and spend much of our time advocating for farming grounded in ecology and stewardship.
NEWS
July 6, 1995 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the Fourth of July holiday, I spent a lot of time in the grocery store--note that I said "store" in the singular. Thereby hangs a tale. You might be surprised to hear that the Earthwatch columnist, often a strident promoter of organic and un-chemically grown food, didn't trek all over the county to little health food stores. He found everything he needed at Ralphs.
FOOD
January 10, 1991
Thank you for your story by Daniel P. Puzo (Nov. 29), which brought David Steinman's book, "Diet for a Poisoned Planet" to my attention. It is amazing how the profit motive rules over health in America. It is even more amazing that the Bush Administration would allow itself to be lobbied by the big chemical companies to continue to use pesticides on foods when the literature is jammed with documentation that these substances are causing harm in the population. Hooray for Lone Ranger David Steinman for writing "Diet for a Poisoned Planet."
BUSINESS
January 28, 2001
With many grocery stores still cleaning the remaining recalled products containing genetically engineered StarLink corn off their shelves, the Food and Drug Administration released a weak new policy regulating these genetically engineered foods that will do nothing to protect consumers or the environment ["FDA Proposes Regulations for Bioengineered Crops," Jan. 18]. The FDA's new policy does not require that genetically altered foods be tested before going to market, so we have no way of knowing the long-term effects these foods will have on our health and the environment.
FOOD
June 19, 1986 | TOM SIETSEMA, The Washington Post
"Safe Food to Go," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recently issued guide to out-of-home food handling, reminds us that salmonella (a bacteria present in some raw or undercooked food, or food that has come into contact with infected raw food) and Staphylococcus aureus (a bacteria sometimes spread by the handling of food) are no strangers any time of the year.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
With the presidential inauguration days away, the Food and Drug Administration wants to assure us that the food to be eaten amidst all the pomp and circumstance won't give anyone a nasty case of food poisoning. “This week, at the request of the U.S. Secret Service and D.C. Department of Health, we've assembled a team of 35 FDA staff from across the U.S. including 18 experts in retail foods and field inspection,” FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said on the FDA blog .   “Their mission?
BUSINESS
July 29, 2012 | By Patti Waldmeir
"What makes Chinese people tick?" What a great opening sentence for a book. Because what makes Chinese people tick is also what makes Chinese people buy. And these days, virtually everyone involved in selling anything, anywhere, wants to know how to sell it to the Chinese. The line comes from "What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism and China'sModern Consumer," a new book published by Palgrave Macmillan and written by Tom Doctoroff, chief executive of advertising agency JWT in Shanghai and the doyen of foreign marketers in China.
OPINION
January 9, 2011 | By Nicolette Hahn Niman
Our holiday table got quite tense. We are a mixed family ? Jewish, Christian, Republican, Democrat ?? but the tension wasn't from differences over religion or politics. It was about food. At one end of the table sat my husband's nephew, who runs a food bank. He's an earnest man who spends his days seeking nourishment for the hungry, and favors almost anything that increases food's availability or lowers its price. My husband and I occupied the other end. We operate a pasture-based ranch, and spend much of our time advocating for farming grounded in ecology and stewardship.
FOOD
May 20, 2010 | Betty Hallock
How to decipher the runaway success of Ludo Lefebvre? The chef has L.A. on a culinary string and doesn't even have a professional stove to call his own. Reservations at his pop-up restaurant LudoBites - several-week stints of Lefebvre cooking at various locations, including a bakery and an art gallery - sell out overnight. And if he's serving fried chicken from a food truck, the line of customers/fanatics will be an hour (or two) long. This month he was dubbed a "chef of the future" in Time.
OPINION
March 9, 2008
Re "Making food safe," editorial, March 4 America enjoys the safest food supply in the world, but the recent beef recall and other incidents have raised consumer concerns about our nation's food safety net. Last year, the Grocery Manufacturers Assn. released its "Four Pillars of Imported Food Safety" proposal, which calls on federal agencies to focus on prevention as the essential weapon against food-borne illnesses. As part of this approach, we believe the Food and Drug Administration must be given the resources to fulfill its critical food safety mission, including a doubling of its current budget.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2001
With many grocery stores still cleaning the remaining recalled products containing genetically engineered StarLink corn off their shelves, the Food and Drug Administration released a weak new policy regulating these genetically engineered foods that will do nothing to protect consumers or the environment ["FDA Proposes Regulations for Bioengineered Crops," Jan. 18]. The FDA's new policy does not require that genetically altered foods be tested before going to market, so we have no way of knowing the long-term effects these foods will have on our health and the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Re "Taco Bell Recalls Shells That Used Bioengineered Corn," Sept. 23: I am not a rocket scientist, but won't the StarLink "approved for animal use" bioengineered corn containing the pest-repelling protein Cry9C get into the human food chain if we eat the animals that eat the corn? Yo quiero safe food! ALAN GUTTMAN Los Angeles
BUSINESS
July 29, 2012 | By Patti Waldmeir
"What makes Chinese people tick?" What a great opening sentence for a book. Because what makes Chinese people tick is also what makes Chinese people buy. And these days, virtually everyone involved in selling anything, anywhere, wants to know how to sell it to the Chinese. The line comes from "What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism and China'sModern Consumer," a new book published by Palgrave Macmillan and written by Tom Doctoroff, chief executive of advertising agency JWT in Shanghai and the doyen of foreign marketers in China.
FOOD
May 20, 2010 | Betty Hallock
How to decipher the runaway success of Ludo Lefebvre? The chef has L.A. on a culinary string and doesn't even have a professional stove to call his own. Reservations at his pop-up restaurant LudoBites - several-week stints of Lefebvre cooking at various locations, including a bakery and an art gallery - sell out overnight. And if he's serving fried chicken from a food truck, the line of customers/fanatics will be an hour (or two) long. This month he was dubbed a "chef of the future" in Time.
HEALTH
January 10, 2000 | VALERIE ULENE and JONATHAN FIELDING
As specialists in public health, we're accustomed to reports of food poisoning. But one recent case really surprised us. It involved a friend of ours, a physician no less, who ignored the simple rules of food safety and got into trouble. Just returned from a weeklong vacation and hungry, he ate some leftover spare ribs that had been in the refrigerator for more than two weeks.
NEWS
July 6, 1995 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the Fourth of July holiday, I spent a lot of time in the grocery store--note that I said "store" in the singular. Thereby hangs a tale. You might be surprised to hear that the Earthwatch columnist, often a strident promoter of organic and un-chemically grown food, didn't trek all over the county to little health food stores. He found everything he needed at Ralphs.
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