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TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Sonja Bjelland, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Amanda Coronado wakes up every morning wondering whether she'll be able to walk out of her bedroom. It's almost impossible on a bad day. The world is moving too much for her to keep her balance. "I can't just go for a run," she said. "I can hardly find my feet. " During the first week of August, Coronado took a cruise along the Mexican coast. Since stepping off the ship, that feeling of cresting, rolling waves has not gone away. At first she thought it was funny.
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WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The expanding transatlantic scandal over U.S. eavesdropping on Europe's leaders and spying on its citizens has begun to strain intelligence relationships and diplomatic ties between allies that call each other best friends, according to diplomats and foreign policy experts. The cascade of embarrassing disclosures is not expected to upend one of President Obama's goals, a proposed transatlantic free-trade agreement that could generate billions of dollars a year, or halt cooperation on top security issues, such as efforts to curb Iran's nuclear program and contain the Syrian civil war. But the documents leaked by former National Security Agency computer specialist Edward Snowden, which on Wednesday exposed a joint U.S.-British spying operation on the Internet, have caused friction in multiple capitals and put the Obama administration on the defensive at home and abroad.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 1999 | Greg Miller
Leading consumer groups are set to announce today a joint resolution condemning the "safe harbor" agreement U.S. officials are seeking to protect American companies from a strict new European privacy law. The resolution could be an embarrassing development for the officials, who are scheduled to resume talks with European negotiators today in Washington over what has become a nettlesome privacy dispute. U.S. officials were unavailable for comment.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
Into the dramatic void left by the end of the government shutdown comes Anthony Weiner, as familiar as Congress itself with looking into a bottomless abyss. Last heard from when he stumbled to a single-digit finish in the New York City mayoral primary, Weiner returns via the pages of GQ magazine in a compelling piece that explores the rationales and regrets of the man who sexted his way out of Congress and back into politics, only to falter when more instances of electronic misbehavior surfaced.
SPORTS
March 25, 2012 | By Broderick Turner
The Clippers' victory over Memphis on Saturday eased some of the distractions that had enveloped the team amid talk of tension in the locker room, inconsistent effort on the court and speculation about Coach Vinny Del Negro's job security. But breaking a three-game losing streak was what mattered most to the players. "It's not just important for us to continue winning for other purposes, it's important for everything," guard Randy Foye said. "We need to be successful, man. "I've never been to the playoffs before, so I'm going to do everything in my power to try and make that happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2001 | JOHN CLARK
Newfoundland is a tough place. The weather is harsh and unpredictable, travel and communication are difficult. It's wind-whipped, fog-bound, and home to moose, caribou, black spruce and not much else. To make a movie here, you have to embrace these conditions, even if it means embracing a garbage can, a toilet bowl or a ship's railing--and then losing your lunch.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The deepening monetary crisis in Europe sharply boosted the dollar on Wednesday as investors viewed the greenback as a safe haven for the time being. The dollar's rally, to 1.514 German marks from 1.491 Tuesday, boosted speculation that the U.S. currency may be mounting a sustained comeback from its recent all-time lows of just below 1.40 marks. In Asia early today, the dollar continued strong at 1.516 marks. Meanwhile, gold prices rose sharply in New York Wednesday.
NEWS
October 29, 1994 | LYNN FRANEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A team of Orange County missionaries who recently returned from Rwanda said they found orphans with pneumonia and tuberculosis and no medicine to treat them, children with raging ear infections, and a child considered deaf but who could hear if only he had a hearing aid. The 12-day trip by Safe Harbor International, which is part of Calvary Chapel in Rancho Santa Margarita, took the missionaries to orphanages bursting with children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Matthew P. Manoukian , a captain in the U.S. Marines, came from a family committed to public service and the law. Both his parents are judges - his father, Socrates Peter Manoukian, a Santa Clara County Superior Court judge, and his mother, Patricia Bamattre-Manoukian, a state appellate court justice. His uncle, William Bamattre, was the fire chief of Los Angeles for 11 years. Manoukian grew up in Los Altos Hills in Northern California with a keen sense of history and how America has provided a safe harbor for refugees.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC Issues Warning on 'Offshore' Stock Sales: The Securities and Exchange Commission said it will go after companies or people who illegally invoke a "safe harbor" provision to evade the registration of securities sold to foreign buyers. The warning was raised in settling an administrative case involving Candie's Inc., a Purchase, N.Y.-based clothing company, and Response USA Inc., a Lawrenceville, N.J.-based maker of personal emergency response products. Regulators said the respondents sold $3.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
In sweeping new rules aimed at fixing the home lending market, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday will define a "qualified mortgage" - one a borrower can actually be expected to pay back - while in effect banning a slew of dicey loans at the center of the financial crisis. The regulations, among the most important handed down yet by the 18-month-old agency, also aim to loosen the choking loan standards that have prevailed since the housing crash. They do so by limiting bankers' liability for prime loans that can be sold to government-backed mortgage giants such as Fannie Mae. The rules, to be phased in over the coming year, aim to improve access for creditworthy borrowers to today's historically low-interest loans and to create a stable and predictable housing finance system for banks and their customers alike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Matthew P. Manoukian , a captain in the U.S. Marines, came from a family committed to public service and the law. Both his parents are judges - his father, Socrates Peter Manoukian, a Santa Clara County Superior Court judge, and his mother, Patricia Bamattre-Manoukian, a state appellate court justice. His uncle, William Bamattre, was the fire chief of Los Angeles for 11 years. Manoukian grew up in Los Altos Hills in Northern California with a keen sense of history and how America has provided a safe harbor for refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | Bob Pool
Warning that a wave of demolition threatens to engulf Terminal Island, a national preservation group has named the site at the Port of Los Angeles one of America's most endangered historic places. A proposed road realignment would require the demolition of three pioneering tuna fish canneries as well as a shipyard that played a major role in both world wars, the National Trust for Historic Preservation said Wednesday. Additionally, a 61-year-old cannery steam plant and a trio of boat repair buildings that date back to 1903 are due to be razed, the trust said.
SPORTS
March 25, 2012 | By Broderick Turner
The Clippers' victory over Memphis on Saturday eased some of the distractions that had enveloped the team amid talk of tension in the locker room, inconsistent effort on the court and speculation about Coach Vinny Del Negro's job security. But breaking a three-game losing streak was what mattered most to the players. "It's not just important for us to continue winning for other purposes, it's important for everything," guard Randy Foye said. "We need to be successful, man. "I've never been to the playoffs before, so I'm going to do everything in my power to try and make that happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Nate Jackson and Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Redondo Beach awoke Tuesday to find a carpet of death laid atop the water, as if Davy Jones himself had burped up a couple hundred years worth of lunches. Thousands of silvery sardines floated atop the King Harbor marina fin-to-fin, with hundreds of thousands more, perhaps millions, piled on the coppery bottom, 18 inches deep in some spots. If this was a natural event, as officials say it was, Mother Nature did not show her best face. The Southern California coast, and Los Angeles County harbors in particular, have suffered from time to time from poor water quality and chemical intrusions.
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Sonja Bjelland, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Amanda Coronado wakes up every morning wondering whether she'll be able to walk out of her bedroom. It's almost impossible on a bad day. The world is moving too much for her to keep her balance. "I can't just go for a run," she said. "I can hardly find my feet. " During the first week of August, Coronado took a cruise along the Mexican coast. Since stepping off the ship, that feeling of cresting, rolling waves has not gone away. At first she thought it was funny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A church group is setting up one of the first American-sponsored orphanages in Rwanda since tribal violence there left tens of thousands of children without parents or separated from relatives they may never see again. Safe Harbor Ministries, with the Calvary Chapel of Rancho Santa Margarita, hopes to open the tent city to accommodate about 3,000 children near the end of September, said Bob Krantz, acting director.
OPINION
May 19, 2010
Sour notes Re "Barbs reveal a 'Ring' divided," May 14 At last! It is revealed that Emperor Achim Freyer has no clothes, something patently obvious to those of us who have endured his abortive "Ring of the Nibelung" production these last two seasons at the Los Angeles Opera. Freyer's cartoonish concepts mocked Richard Wagner's complex dramatic vision and transcendent musical score. He ignored completely the practical issues of performers. It was pathetic to observe a fine singer like John Treleaven injure himself and then bravely soldier on in this idiotic production.
TRAVEL
June 22, 2008 | Jordan Rane, Special to The Times
It's not the kind of early-bird weekend crowd you'd expect to see crashing the gates of the Naval Weapons Support Facility in Seal Beach. But here we are, about 40 latte-sipping civilians and me chatting beside a barbed wire fence with binoculars slung around our necks. We're gathered in a parking lot on the most uninviting-looking block of Seal Beach Boulevard, between the ocean and Interstate 405. Up the road is a Boeing plant. Across the street, a pair of oil derricks nods monotonously.
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