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Safe Passage

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OPINION
August 24, 2003 | Cathy Singer, Cathy Singer is a producer for "Dateline NBC." Her son Benjamin Petuchowski attends USC.
Last week, in a rite of passage that millions of parents and their offspring traditionally share this time of year, I accompanied my son Ben from Chicago to Los Angeles, where he is starting college. We bought extra-long sheets, Band-Aids, laundry detergent and enough shampoo to last the year. Then I helped him move into the dorm. Things were different when I went off to college in 1973. For starters, my parents didn't drive or fly with me from Milwaukee to Amherst, Mass.
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NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is changing the rules for refugees and asylum seekers in the United States so that people will no longer be barred entry for providing incidental or unintentional support to terrorist organizations. The new definition of what it means to provide “material support” to terrorists comes after years of complaints from human rights advocates that the old rules led to the exclusion of vulnerable refugees who pose no harm. Among those turned away in recent months were a Syrian refugee who paid an opposition group to gain safe passage out of Syria and a farmer who paid tolls to a resistance group to cross a bridge to take his food to market, according to the Department of Homeland Security.
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NEWS
October 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat accepted an agreement with Israel clearing the way for opening a "safe passage" route for Palestinians between the West Bank and Gaza Strip, chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat said. "The safe passage agreement will be signed [today]," Erekat said. Prime Minister Ehud Barak approved the terms earlier. Officials said they expected the route to open this week. The Gaza Strip and West Bank are about 24 miles apart and separated by Israeli land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
I used to be intrigued by Edward Snowden, the NSA leaker who did the country a favor by revealing proof of the government's intrusive domestic spying program. Now, I am starting to feel a little sorry for the guy, a fugitive who has become a kind of worldwide reject, as his quest for political asylum has begun to look like the geopolitical equivalent of “Let's Make a Deal.” He's asked 21 countries so far to accept him. So far, no one has said “Come on down!” In a statement posted on the WikiLeaks site this week, Snowden angrily denounced the U.S. for annulling his passport.
WORLD
December 11, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The de facto government of Honduras withdrew its offer Thursday to deposed President Manuel Zelaya of safe passage out of the country, asserting he could leave only if he renounced his claim to the office. The actions by Honduras' coup-installed rulers threw cold water on efforts to free Zelaya from the Brazilian Embassy, where he took refuge 2 1/2 months ago. "I could be here 10 years," Zelaya told a radio station from inside the embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | From Reuters
Israeli and Palestinian negotiators have failed in another round of talks to end a security dispute, delaying the opening of the first Palestinian "safe passage" across Israel. After four hours of negotiations late Sunday, spokesmen for both sides said the teams would meet again today. "There were some suggestions made during the meeting, and I think we will finish in tomorrow's session," Jamil Tarifi, a Palestinian Cabinet minister on the negotiating team, said Sunday.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The wife of ousted Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega and his three daughters have been granted safe passage out of the country, Foreign Minister Julio Linares said. The four had been holed up in the Cuban Embassy since the Dec. 20 U.S. invasion. Their destination was not known.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are so many family crises in "Safe Passage" that it seizes up right in front of our eyes. Did even Eugene O'Neill cram as much mother-father-son misery into one evening? It's about Mag Singer (Susan Sarandon), her seven sons and her estranged husband, Patrick (Sam Shepard). The subplots and cross-plots total about 14--any of them would be enough to fill out a movie. And yet, all together, they form a big glob of undifferentiated upset.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.N. peacekeepers said Saturday that the warring parties in Bosnia-Herzegovina have agreed to allow safe passage for aid convoys from the Sarajevo airport to the hungry city. Bosnia's president, Alija Izetbegovic, meanwhile, reportedly made a fresh appeal for Western intervention to halt the fighting. Izetbegovic asked for an urgent meeting of the U.N. Security Council on the fighting and appealed anew for intervention.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
President Bush suggested for the first time Tuesday that he would be willing to give Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein safe passage to another country. Asked at his news conference whether he agreed with a comment by his wife, Barbara, that Hussein could be tried for war crimes and then hanged, Bush said: "I seldom differ with my wife, and I don't know that I would differ with her here." But, he added, the most important task is "to get Saddam Hussein out of there."
WORLD
June 17, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- Julian Assange, the founder of the WikiLeaks website, is prepared to stay holed up inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London for as long as five years if necessary in order to avoid extradition to Sweden to face what he says are politically motivated allegations of sexual assault, the Ecuadorean foreign minister said Monday. Assange is accused of sexually assaulting two women on separate occasions in Stockholm in August 2010. He was arrested in London in December of that year, which began a series of legal appeals by his attorneys to block his extradition to Sweden.
WORLD
June 23, 2010 | By Julia Love, Los Angeles Times
Legislators admonished military officials Tuesday for disregarding warnings that U.S. taxpayers have been bankrolling a mafia-style scheme in which private security contractors transporting supplies to troops in Afghanistan are forced to pay warlords for safe passage. At a hearing, Rep. John F. Tierney (D-Mass.) blamed a lack of military oversight for the protection payments, which are costing millions of dollars. A congressional report released Monday by Tierney's subcommittee on national security and foreign affairs revealed that the protection racket may be damaging U.S. troops' efforts to build a legitimate Afghan government by funneling money to the insurgency.
OPINION
May 9, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Last week's British election was important as much for what didn't happen as for what did. The opposition Conservative Party won the most votes, but it didn't win a clear majority of seats in Parliament. The third-party Liberal Democrats, who hoped to surge into second place ahead of the deflated Labor government, fell short. As British television pundits noted, it was a reverse trifecta: All three parties lost. All politics is local, of course, but Britain's grouchy electorate sent a message that has echoes in the rest of Europe and even the United States: Voters aren't looking for massive change right now; they're looking for leaders who can find a safe way out of a deep economic crisis that never seems to end. Thirty years ago, when Ronald Reagan won an election in the United States on the heels of Margaret Thatcher's victory in Britain, it was possible to talk about a wave of conservative politics sweeping the Western world — especially since Reagan and Thatcher shared a common passion for downsizing the liberal welfare state.
WORLD
December 11, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The de facto government of Honduras withdrew its offer Thursday to deposed President Manuel Zelaya of safe passage out of the country, asserting he could leave only if he renounced his claim to the office. The actions by Honduras' coup-installed rulers threw cold water on efforts to free Zelaya from the Brazilian Embassy, where he took refuge 2 1/2 months ago. "I could be here 10 years," Zelaya told a radio station from inside the embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2008 | DeeDee Correll, Special to The Times
On a quiet sage- and pine-dotted stretch of highway in southwest Colorado, deer and elk wander into the paths of oncoming cars so often that they account for 70% of the crashes that occur there. If this were another road, Colorado transportation officials might fence it off to keep the animals from crossing. But the one-mile portion of U.S. Highway 160 is an important migration route for wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2006 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
Six North Korean defectors -- the first refugees the U.S. has admitted from the totalitarian nation -- arrived in Southern California on Saturday bearing accounts of famine, sexual enslavement, torture and repression. The group was met at Los International Airport by leaders of four large Korean congregations in Southern California, all members of the Korean Church Coalition, which has pushed the government to take in North Korean refugees.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | From Reuters
A convoy of several hundred trucks carrying food and fuel from the Soviet Union reached the Afghan capital virtually unscathed Saturday following a deal reportedly struck between rebels and President Najibullah. Afghan officials said up to 600 trucks arrived in Kabul from the Soviet border town of Termez, and 300 more are expected today.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Projecting the image of a confident leader who refuses to become a figurative hostage to crisis, President Alberto Fujimori said Friday that his government is working on a potential solution in which guerrillas holding 74 captives here would be granted safe passage to another country. "This is a possibility which naturally we are pursuing," the Peruvian president told The Times, in his first newspaper interview since the hostage standoff began.
WORLD
May 6, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The leader of a rebellious Black Sea region resigned early today in the face of sweeping protests against his rule, giving Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili an important victory in his attempt to consolidate his fractured country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2004 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
South Los Angeles resident Larry Thompson heard gunfire almost every day when he moved into his home across the street from Crenshaw High School three years ago. And recently, the neighborhood was closed off by police to prevent brawls outside a football game. Violence is omnipresent, says the father of three boys.
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