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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1986
Ever since 1960, the state of California has provided loans and grants to public water agencies to assist in the construction and improvement of treatment facilities. This service, financed by publicly approved bond funds, has become more crucial than ever. Because of budget cuts in recent years, federal financing is not as readily available. And contamination of water supplies has become an increasing concern to health authorities and public officials.
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NATIONAL
January 10, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The federal government began moving in water to help hundreds of thousands of people struggling on Friday to cope with the effect of a chemical spill that has left water in nine counties around Charleston, W.Va., off limits for drinking, bathing and cleaning.  Even as aid was being rushed to the area, the U.S. Attorney's office announced it would investigate the spill of a chemical used to prepare coal flow into the Elk River.   President Obama issued a federal disaster declaration for the state on Friday and the Federal Emergency Management Agency and other emergency teams began transporting water to the region where as many as 300,000 people were warned not to use municipal water.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2000
In 1995, the Los Angeles City Council unanimously approved using $36 million in state funds for a water reclamation project to replace water the city had for half a century drained from Mono Lake. Today the reclamation project is built and ready to go. But City Councilman Joel Wachs, now a candidate for mayor and not above a bit of demagogy, is having second thoughts. He claims he didn't understand back then what the project would do.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Responding to complaints from businesses, Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing an overhaul of California's 26-year-old landmark clean water and anti-toxins law that he said is being misused by "unscrupulous lawyers" filing lawsuits. At issue is the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, or Proposition 65, approved by voters in 1986. It requires product manufacturers, retailers and property owners to post signs warning the public if goods or premises contain chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer or birth defects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER
The 10,000 to 15,000 low- and middle-income residents of the El Rio and Nyeland Acres areas could get state help to pay for new safe water supplies, a state health official said Thursday. A state grant of up to $400,000 could save the residents the estimated $2,000 per household needed to solve the area's nitrate contamination problem, said Daniel Carrigan, the state Department of Health Services worker who arranges for state funding.
NEWS
October 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
Flood waters from a storm that dumped up to 18 inches of rain on the Northeast ruptured a pipeline Tuesday, leaving at least 120,000 people in and around Maine's largest city without drinking water. The powerful weekend nor'easter was blamed for at least seven deaths from New Jersey to New Hampshire. Another person was missing in Maine. "No showers, no coffee and I can't even use the bathroom," said Laurie Davis of Westbrook, outside Portland.
WORLD
March 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Mismanagement, limited resources and environmental damage have combined to deny 1.1 billion people access to safe water, says a new United Nations report issued Thursday. Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the hardest-hit areas, where ecological degradation, poor water management and a burgeoning population have led to water shortages, exacerbating poverty, disease and drought, the report says. The 24 U.N.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | LAURAN NEERGAARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Salt, a small generator and a germ-resistant water bucket are helping villagers in the mountains of Bolivia turn a contaminated river into safe drinking water. Its creators say the simple experiment has the potential to fight world epidemics of cholera and other waterborne disease, for pennies a week. "This is a low-tech, low-budget approach that . . . empowers these people to protect themselves," said Dr. Eric Mintz, an epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000
Re "Tests Find High Chromium 6 Levels Throughout County," Oct. 5: The government officials you quote should be clear about the difference between "safe" water and "acceptable" risk. "Safe" water does not contain contaminants such as chromium 6. Water that meets regulatory standards is not necessarily "safe." Safety is a concept rooted in scientific fact. The "acceptability" of the risk we take in drinking water containing chromium 6 is a moral judgment made by environmental regulators and water suppliers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2000
Kudos to The Times for "Safe Water, Iffy Politics," June 18. Well-reasoned and thorough, effective in both logic and tone, it is the best example of editorial writing in recent memory. Councilman [Joel] Wachs and Sen. [Richard] Alarcon have taken the wrong course on this issue. Instead of informing the public about the merits of water reclamation, they have chosen to parrot some outspoken but ignorant constituents for political gains. I hope their opponents prevail and we don't have these duplicitous self-serving rascals to contend with in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
California has failed to spend $455 million in federal safe-drinking-water funds and isn't adequately managing the program that administers the money, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials said. "Nearly half a billion dollars that could be actively used today is being held and basically parked," said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA regional administrator. Blumenfeld's office on Friday sent a notice of noncompliance to the California Department of Public Health, warning that if the state doesn't take corrective action within 60 days, the EPA may suspend grant payments to the program.
HEALTH
March 10, 2012 | Roy M. Wallack, Wallack is the co-author of "Barefoot Running Step by Step" and "Bike for Life: How to Ride to 100."
Staying hydrated is serious business when you're working out. Sure, you can just grab any old $3 plastic water bottle and go out for a run, but these days you also can buy a customized bottle that complements your sport, your music and even your hygiene requirements. Here are some of the new shapes, materials, technologies and accessories that'll help you go with the flow. Safe water anywhere A 750-milliliter bottle with a water-purifying cap with built-in, bacteria-killing ultraviolet light that creates drinkable water in 60 seconds for use in hiking, international travel and daily workouts.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Maria Shriver and Arnold Schwarzenegger's 13-year-old son, Christopher, was seriously injured in a boogie boarding accident in Malibu, L.A. Now reports . It's any parent's nightmare -- a fun day at the beach leads to a potentially life-threatening injury. The jury's out on exactly how safe water sports like boogie boarding and surfing are. A 2007 study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine found that surfing is far less dangerous than many other sports, with just 6.6 significant injuries per 1,000 hours of surfing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
As if we didn't have enough to worry about, the quietly apocalyptic "Flow" makes a good case that what's going on with our planet's water supply should make you very, very afraid. Any film that begins with a bleak W.H. Auden quote ("Thousands have lived without love, not one without water") is not going to be a ray of sunshine in anyone's life. Made over a five-year period by director Irena Salina, who went all over the world and talked to an impressive list of experts, "Flow" (which also stands for "For Love of Water")
WORLD
March 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Mismanagement, limited resources and environmental damage have combined to deny 1.1 billion people access to safe water, says a new United Nations report issued Thursday. Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the hardest-hit areas, where ecological degradation, poor water management and a burgeoning population have led to water shortages, exacerbating poverty, disease and drought, the report says. The 24 U.N.
OPINION
September 19, 2004
Re "Drying the Tears of Thirsty Nations" by Margaret Wertheim, Opinion, Sept. 12: The important article on the water crisis that our planet is facing has ignored the effect of politics on the solution of this crisis. Israel, where water has always been critically scarce, has been able to cope by inventing and improving techniques -- desalination, novel irrigation technologies, conservation of rainfall water, etc. -- that could help solve many of the problems of water-challenged nations elsewhere.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The federal government began moving in water to help hundreds of thousands of people struggling on Friday to cope with the effect of a chemical spill that has left water in nine counties around Charleston, W.Va., off limits for drinking, bathing and cleaning.  Even as aid was being rushed to the area, the U.S. Attorney's office announced it would investigate the spill of a chemical used to prepare coal flow into the Elk River.   President Obama issued a federal disaster declaration for the state on Friday and the Federal Emergency Management Agency and other emergency teams began transporting water to the region where as many as 300,000 people were warned not to use municipal water.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
As if we didn't have enough to worry about, the quietly apocalyptic "Flow" makes a good case that what's going on with our planet's water supply should make you very, very afraid. Any film that begins with a bleak W.H. Auden quote ("Thousands have lived without love, not one without water") is not going to be a ray of sunshine in anyone's life. Made over a five-year period by director Irena Salina, who went all over the world and talked to an impressive list of experts, "Flow" (which also stands for "For Love of Water")
MAGAZINE
July 25, 2004 | Patti Paniccia, Patti Paniccia last wrote for the magazine about the trademark war over Duke Kahanamoku's name.
Perhaps the best testimony to Phyllis Currie's insistent and persistent leadership came last January when, amid ongoing celebrations of the successful Mars rover mission, NASA Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory came to Pasadena to attend two community meetings and assure locals that the space agency was working hard to resolve their decades-old problem--water more than 200 feet below the surface of the renowned Jet Propulsion Laboratory that was contaminated during JPL's early rocket testing
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2001 | RAY RICHMOND, Ray Richmond is a freelance journalist and screenwriter who lives in West Hollywood
Standing in line outside Staples Center with my 13-year-old daughter about 90 minutes before the recent Britney Spears concert, the security phalanx appeared formidable. Men in suits were everywhere, barking into walkie-talkies, holstered weaponry at the ready. Airport-style metal detectors loomed at the arena entrance, where scowling men holding scanning wands outnumbered the staffers taking tickets. We surely have become a different country in this post-Sept. 11 world.
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