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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1990
Should we feel safer because we're talking about cutting nuclear arms by 30%? Would we feel safer if muggers had 30% fewer bullets in their guns? GERALD M. BRONSON Sherman Oaks
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OPINION
March 13, 2005 | Arthur Herman, Arthur Herman is the author, most recently, of "To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World" (HarperCollins, 2004).
Terrorists swarm into Iraq; North Korea plays nuclear blackmail; Syria and Iran hold hands in public; crowds fill Beirut's streets; the shooting of an Italian journalist provokes outrage across Europe. Is this a world being made safe for democracy or a world on the brink? Some, especially Europeans, say the latter, arguing that this is what happens when the planet is stuck with just one superpower.
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NEWS
September 20, 2001 | Dave Wilson, dave.wilson@latimes.com
Herbert Lin, a senior scientist with the National Research Council, offers a chilling calculation. He estimates the twin impacts of aircraft on the World Trade Center released about a kiloton of energy combined--or the equivalent of a tactical nuclear weapon. "Of course, a nuclear explosion would release all that energy in a microsecond, and this energy was released over several seconds, so they're very different," he said. "But it's sobering."
OPINION
March 18, 2002 | BARRY M. BLECHMAN, Barry M. Blechman was assistant director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency from 1977 to 1980.
The Bush administration's new nuclear policy has received a great deal of criticism over its suggestion that U.S. nuclear weapons play a role in deterring hostile nations that don't possess nuclear weapons but are armed with other kinds of weapons of mass destruction. The criticism--that the new policy lowers the bar for use of nuclear weapons--is misplaced. In fact, by linking U.S. nuclear and conventional precision strike capabilities, the policy narrows the role of nuclear weapons in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2001
Re "U.S. Looking at Spacecraft as Bomber," July 28: Now, to make it an even safer world, Dr. StrangeBush and his administration are looking to develop a space bomber that can destroy targets on the other side of the world in 30 minutes. It would drop precision bombs from heights of 60 miles or more, traveling at 15 times the speed and 10 times the altitude of current heavy bombers. I'm sure other countries around the world will see this as just a "defensive system" too. Mark McIntyre Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1993
In response to Marotta's whining diatribe on taxes, there is an obvious connection between " . . . taxes paid and the degree to which we could achieve better lives . . . ": Consider the huge national debt, which is in effect nothing more than deferred taxes. As a result of "paying" this tax, we now live in a safer world (since Ronald Reagan decided that increased debt was the approach we would take to pay for his military buildup). But as with any debt, the longer you put off paying it, the more it costs you in interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987
The article by John Marks and James Garrison (Editorial Pages, March 23), "Superpowers Should Work Together in Third World," made a great deal of sense. Cooperation of the superpowers to solve some of the problems of the Third World where we have no conflict seems a very good place to begin. I could not help but imagine what might be accomplished around the world if the United States and the Soviet Union worked together to solve problems. Many "hot spots" might be working to improve their countries instead of trying to destroy one another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1985
Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger in his article (Editorial Pages, July 9), "Strategic Defense Initiative: Creating Options for a Safer World," reminds us that American science and engineering have often surmounted seemingly impossible problems and challenges. But what if the U.S.S.R. was the first to build the type of shield that the United States is trying to build in the framework of the "Star Wars" program? Some time ago Secretary Weinberger was openly disturbed over such a possibility.
NEWS
October 9, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan arrived in rainy Iceland today, promising frank talk without guarantee of success on arms control and other issues during his weekend rendezvous with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Reagan arrived in the dark and rain at the Keflavik NATO base and made no comments as he was greeted by Iceland's president, Vigdis Finnbogadottir, the only elected woman president in the world, and other officials.
OPINION
March 13, 2005 | Arthur Herman, Arthur Herman is the author, most recently, of "To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World" (HarperCollins, 2004).
Terrorists swarm into Iraq; North Korea plays nuclear blackmail; Syria and Iran hold hands in public; crowds fill Beirut's streets; the shooting of an Italian journalist provokes outrage across Europe. Is this a world being made safe for democracy or a world on the brink? Some, especially Europeans, say the latter, arguing that this is what happens when the planet is stuck with just one superpower.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | Dave Wilson, dave.wilson@latimes.com
Herbert Lin, a senior scientist with the National Research Council, offers a chilling calculation. He estimates the twin impacts of aircraft on the World Trade Center released about a kiloton of energy combined--or the equivalent of a tactical nuclear weapon. "Of course, a nuclear explosion would release all that energy in a microsecond, and this energy was released over several seconds, so they're very different," he said. "But it's sobering."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001
An escalating arms race between Pakistan and its longtime foe and neighbor, India, is something the world can well do without, especially since both countries have nuclear weapons. The Bush administration was smart to slap economic sanctions on a Chinese company it contends supplied missile parts and technology to Pakistan, violating an agreement with the United States. The firm, China Metallurgical Equipment Corp., is an arms producer that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2001
Re "U.S. Looking at Spacecraft as Bomber," July 28: Now, to make it an even safer world, Dr. StrangeBush and his administration are looking to develop a space bomber that can destroy targets on the other side of the world in 30 minutes. It would drop precision bombs from heights of 60 miles or more, traveling at 15 times the speed and 10 times the altitude of current heavy bombers. I'm sure other countries around the world will see this as just a "defensive system" too. Mark McIntyre Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1993
In response to Marotta's whining diatribe on taxes, there is an obvious connection between " . . . taxes paid and the degree to which we could achieve better lives . . . ": Consider the huge national debt, which is in effect nothing more than deferred taxes. As a result of "paying" this tax, we now live in a safer world (since Ronald Reagan decided that increased debt was the approach we would take to pay for his military buildup). But as with any debt, the longer you put off paying it, the more it costs you in interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1991
No future history book on international relations will likely be thought complete without an admiring reference to President George Bush's significant defense speech Friday. In effect, this Republican President--from the party so thoroughly identified with hefty defense spending and hawklike foreign-policy lines--is saying that indeed the fat lady has sung. The Cold War is not only over but the Nuclear Hardware War has to be ratcheted down, too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1990
Should we feel safer because we're talking about cutting nuclear arms by 30%? Would we feel safer if muggers had 30% fewer bullets in their guns? GERALD M. BRONSON Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001
An escalating arms race between Pakistan and its longtime foe and neighbor, India, is something the world can well do without, especially since both countries have nuclear weapons. The Bush administration was smart to slap economic sanctions on a Chinese company it contends supplied missile parts and technology to Pakistan, violating an agreement with the United States. The firm, China Metallurgical Equipment Corp., is an arms producer that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1986 | CAROLINE WHITBECK, Caroline Whitbeck is a philosopher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development and the School of Engineering
Accidents such as the explosion of the space shuttle, the disasters at Chernobyl and Bhopal, the crash of DC-10s due to the faulty design of a cargo door and the burn deaths due to the design of the Ford Pinto gas tank have raised questions in the public mind about whether engineers give sufficient attention to safety. Closer examination shows that engineers often attempt to bring risks to light, but without success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987
The article by John Marks and James Garrison (Editorial Pages, March 23), "Superpowers Should Work Together in Third World," made a great deal of sense. Cooperation of the superpowers to solve some of the problems of the Third World where we have no conflict seems a very good place to begin. I could not help but imagine what might be accomplished around the world if the United States and the Soviet Union worked together to solve problems. Many "hot spots" might be working to improve their countries instead of trying to destroy one another.
NEWS
October 9, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan arrived in rainy Iceland today, promising frank talk without guarantee of success on arms control and other issues during his weekend rendezvous with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Reagan arrived in the dark and rain at the Keflavik NATO base and made no comments as he was greeted by Iceland's president, Vigdis Finnbogadottir, the only elected woman president in the world, and other officials.
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