Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSafes
IN THE NEWS

Safes

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Afraid that cash isn't secure even behind the thick walls of banks, more people are turning to something that has protected money since the days of Jesse James and Bonnie and Clyde: safes. The metal vaults are so popular in some parts of the country that shoppers are depleting store supplies as worries about the nation's economy spread. "What people are putting in them I have no idea," Lowe's Cos. spokeswoman Karen Cobb said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 26, 2014
Re “Stowaway baffles experts,” April 22 Since the 9/11 attacks, billions of dollars have been spent “improving” airport security to guard against vicious lions, tigers and bears, and yet in San Jose a teenage mouse was able to breach that defense, climb into a passenger jet's wheel well and fly to Hawaii. But where a mouse goes, a venomous snake or a poisonous scorpion can surely follow. Arthur Velis Santa Monica I feel so much safer now that there are dozens of toothpaste tubes in bins at airport checkpoints even though a kid was able to hide in a wheel well of an airplane and fly to Hawaii.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
September 6, 1987 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
How safe is your hotel room from theft? It's not an easy question to answer. On one hand, hotels don't freely provide security information, and most police departments don't keep individual theft statistics for hotels in their cities. But certain facts are known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
The father of a 15-year-old boy who stowed away in the wheel-well of a Hawaii-bound plane "thanked God" his son survived the ordeal, saying the boy may have been trying to return to Africa, according to the Voice of America . “When I watched the analysis about the extraordinary and dangerous trip of my son on local TVs and that Allah had saved him, I thanked God and I was very happy,” Abdilahi Yusuf Abdi, of Santa Clara, told VOA's Somali...
NEWS
November 9, 1998 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The safe burglar is quick, quiet and thoroughly professional. No neighbors spot his car as he pulls behind the Chinese restaurant after closing. No one notices him climb atop the roof, chop a hole and slip to a hallway. No alarms are tripped as he kicks open the office door, breaks into the safe and grabs $2,500. On a recent afternoon, after the restaurant owners discover the break-in, LAPD Det. Jim Becker arrives and studies the crime scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Burglars cut a hole in the roof of a Laguna Hills jewelry store and made off with as much as $1 million in merchandise, Orange County sheriff's officials said Thursday. The burglary occurred sometime between Saturday night and Sunday morning at South Bay Jewelry, which is surrounded by restaurants and stores. The jewelry store owner and employees have so far calculated that more than 1,000 pieces of jewelry worth from $700,00 to $1 million were taken the store at 24261 Avenida De La Carlota, said Orange County Sheriff's Lt. Jeff Hallock.
WORLD
September 22, 2011 | By Tom Miyagawa Coulton and John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
The unmarked envelope floated into the living room of the home in northeastern Japan, riding the wave of tsunami floodwaters. Inside, the astounded resident found $40,000 in yen notes. More money has been found in wallets, paper bags, and other containers swept away from their owners and scattered across a landscape ripped apart by the March 11 earthquake. One woman found $26,000 in a purse she had spotted atop a pile of debris. One police locksmith opened the heavy door of a recovered safe to find $1.3 million in yen notes.
NEWS
May 23, 1986 | United Press International
Two jewelers held captive for 15 hours by kidnapers in the heart of Manhattan's diamond district paid their own ransom by turning over $1- million worth of gold and gems from their company safes, police said Thursday. Police sought four men who held brothers Naftali and Izzy Bochner before releasing them Wednesday at separate locations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | By Anthony Mostrom
For a city as conscious of its criminal past as Los Angeles, our collective memory of local heists and homicides rarely extends back further than the 1950s. Yet long before Southern California's Geezer Bandit captured the public's imagination, or the North Hollywood Bank of America shootout horrified the nation, Angelenos were transfixed by a debonair Baptist minister-turned-safecracker who was run to ground in a well-to-do neighborhood near Exposition Park. By his own account, Herbert Emerson Wilson got well over $15 million during his Prohibition Era criminal career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1997
Two men forced their way into a house, tied up a 15-year-old girl who lives there and left with more than $500,000 worth of jewelry and ivory early Thursday. Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies said the two robbers, who were wearing dark clothes and knit caps, went to a house on Sand Canyon Road late Wednesday and asked the girl, whose parents were away, "Does Bill live here?" The girl told them that no one with that name lived at the house.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Passover begins at sundown Monday (today) and the Transportation Security Administration is assuring fliers that its officers will be sensitive to carry-on items associated with the Jewish holiday. "Some travelers will be carrying boxes of matzo, which are consumed as part of the Passover ritual," the agency said in an April 2 statement . "Matzo can be machine or handmade and are typically very thin and fragile, and break easily. Passengers traveling with religious items, including handmade matzo, may request a hand inspection by the TSO [transportation security officer]
OPINION
April 10, 2014
Re "Gunman wounds officer at station," April 8 Someone walked into a Los Angeles Police Department station, a facility where nearly everyone is highly trained in gun usage and mentally prepared to use lethal force to end an encounter, and this would-be killer wasn't instantly disarmed by these people? Sure, let's arm schoolteachers. And market managers. And bus drivers. And crossing guards. And mail carriers. And secretaries in law office lobbies. And greeters at Costco. And why not kids?
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A bug named "Heartbleed" was recently discovered and likely affects most websites on the Internet. Fortunately, an online tool makes it easy for users to quickly check whether a website is secure or not. Heartbleed is a bug that affects OpenSSL, a technology that is used by many Internet services to keep user data secure. Hackers can take advantage of the bug to steal a key code that can then be used to steal information, including user passwords. A fix has been created for the bug, but many websites across the Internet have still not implemented it to their services.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Rain showers forecast for Sunday at the scene of the state's deadly landslide again were expected to hamper the efforts of rescuers digging through the contaminated slurry of debris. Ponds formed in "the pile," forcing crews to "de-water" areas to resume searching, Snohomish County officials said. In the tangle of timber, septic tank fluid and housing materials, rescuers have found music records, wallets, gun safes and ATVs. Hundreds of photographs salvaged from the mud have been assembled on a table, shielded from the rain by a white tent.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - The high-stakes battle over labeling foods with genetically engineered ingredients is back. Less than two years after California voters narrowly turned down a labeling ballot measure, the state Senate is grappling with the issue. The 2012 campaign cost the food industry $46 million to fight, five times more than the amount spent by the measure's proponents. By a 5-2 vote last week, the Health Committee approved Senate Bill 1381, by Sen. Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
About 50 residents were let back into their Fullerton apartment units, which had been red-tagged Friday night after the 5.1 La Habra earthquake, according to Fullerton Fire Battalion Chief John Stokes. City building department inspectors were out in force Saturday to examine the 20 units at the building on Associated Road, and deemed them safe. Elsewhere in the city, about 19 residents in six single-family homes across northern Fullerton remained displaced, Stokes said. Most appeared to be staying with friends or relatives after a nearby shelter at a La Habra community center was closed by the Red Cross due to lack of requests for assistance.
NEWS
December 3, 1985
An armed gang of about 10 men kidnaped two Brinks company employees from their homes, forced them to open the firm's headquarters in Colombes, a Paris suburb, and looted an estimated $9.4 million from safes and strongboxes, police said. One gunman remained with the employees' families during the robbery, and police said the robbers communicated with each other by radio and also monitored police calls. Afterward, the employees and their families were released.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Rain showers forecast for Sunday at the scene of the state's deadly landslide again were expected to hamper the efforts of rescuers digging through the contaminated slurry of debris. Ponds formed in "the pile," forcing crews to "de-water" areas to resume searching, Snohomish County officials said. In the tangle of timber, septic tank fluid and housing materials, rescuers have found music records, wallets, gun safes and ATVs. Hundreds of photographs salvaged from the mud have been assembled on a table, shielded from the rain by a white tent.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Residents along the Stillaguamish River had felt protected from small landslides during the past eight years because Snohomish County spent millions of dollars shoring up the area after a mudslide in 2006, the county's Emergency Management Director John Pennington said Wednesday. But the landslide that struck last Saturday was "large" and "catastrophic,” Pennington said at a news conference.  The mudslide tore through 49 homes. At least 16 people have been confirmed dead and as many as 176 people are missing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Michelle Obama, who has been an effective if tamped-down first lady, took her daughters and mother to China this week. The seven-day trip, which ends Wednesday, is not much different from other most traditional first lady trips, where highly choreographed appearances and interactions centering on the importance of education unfurl predictably. Obama's conversations and statements are friendly, inspirational and anodyne. The Obamas have also taken in the sights, and if you'd like to see what they have seen, you can read her official blog . Their itinerary includes the Forbidden City, the Summer Palace, the Great Wall and the Chengu Panda Base, home to dozens of the magical creatures.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|