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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Burglars cut a hole in the roof of a Laguna Hills jewelry store and made off with as much as $1 million in merchandise, Orange County sheriff's officials said Thursday. The burglary occurred sometime between Saturday night and Sunday morning at South Bay Jewelry, which is surrounded by restaurants and stores. The jewelry store owner and employees have so far calculated that more than 1,000 pieces of jewelry worth from $700,00 to $1 million were taken the store at 24261 Avenida De La Carlota, said Orange County Sheriff's Lt. Jeff Hallock.
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SPORTS
February 19, 2014 | Helene Elliott
SOCHI, Russia - The Sochi Olympics will continue without the Russian hockey team, which was stifled by Finland in a 3-1 quarterfinal loss Wednesday at the Bolshoy Ice Dome. Russia's elimination probably will dampen the Olympic passion of fans who saw this as a chance to recapture excellence not seen since the era of the old Soviet Union's Big Red Machine. Linemates Teemu Selanne, 43, and Mikael Granlund, 21, each scored and assisted on the other's goal as Finland advanced to a semifinal matchup Friday against Sweden, which Selanne called "our lovely rival.
SPORTS
February 4, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - As his plane approached Sochi-Adler International Airport, flying low over the coast, Erik Guay glanced out the window. Warships sat anchored on the Black Sea below. "That's the first sight you get," the Canadian skier said. "In a way, it makes you feel safe. " Security has been a major concern leading up to the 2014 Sochi Olympics. These Games are considered particularly vulnerable to terrorist attacks because of their proximity to the North Caucasus, a region where Islamic militants have waged a violent insurgency.
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The blockbuster theft of credit card data from Target during the holiday shopping rush was just one example of the way outdated cards are leaving Americans more vulnerable to fraud and identity theft than shoppers are in other developed countries. The good news is that the credit card industry is in the process of fixing part of the problem. The bad news is that squabbling among retailers, banks and payment processors is getting in the way of a more complete solution. The United States is one of the few remaining places where credit and debit cards rely on a magnetic stripe, rather than a microchip, to store and transmit account information.
OPINION
January 31, 2014
Re "Banks put cost ahead of card risk," Column, Jan. 28 David Lazarus is correct that switching to chip-and-PIN cards would make for a much safer credit-card system. But his repeated mantra that lawmakers should impose heavy fines on companies whose customers' personal data are compromised is rather naive. Companies don't have as much control over the more intelligent hackers as he might think. Yes, I was one of those customers whose card was compromised when I used it at Target, but I feel sorry for the corporation, not bitter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO Two engineers who say their safety concerns about the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge were suppressed by Caltrans higher-ups told a state Senate committee Friday that they nevertheless believe the new eastern span of the structure is safe. California Department of Transportation director Malcolm Dougherty, meanwhile, reluctantly conceded that "there has to have been mistakes made," but insisted that no coercion had occurred and that "if we had any concerns about safety on the bridge, we would not have opened it in September.
SPORTS
January 23, 2014 | David Wharton
In a few days, Dan Richards will hit the ground in Sochi to begin final preparations for the Winter Olympics. As head of a Boston-based crisis management and response company, Richards has been hired to help protect the U.S. ski and snowboard teams while they compete in Russia. He hopes for an uneventful few weeks, but with recent news of terrorist bombings in the region and Islamist militants threatening further attacks, his job could prove difficult. "I think there is a high degree of concern and nervousness," the chief executive of Global Rescue said.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A Southwest Airlines jet that landed at the wrong Missouri airport successfully took off despite a short runway and was heading to an airport that can accommodate its size. The Boeing jet took off from the Taney County airport in Missouri without incident Monday afternoon.  Airline officials said they didn't know why the craft, carrying 124 passengers and a crew of five, went to the smaller airport, which does not usually handle such large airplanes. It was supposed to have landed at Branson Airport, about seven miles away.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The water ban that left 300,000 people in West Virginia unable to drink tap water, shower or wash their clothes was lifted in some places on Monday as the aftermath of a chemical spill stretched into its fifth day. But as hospitals began to get their water systems online and officials disbursed instructions to homeowners on how to clean out the chemical that contaminated their tap water -- and in some cases, their clothes and their dishes --...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
A baby girl became the first newborn in 2014 to be safely surrendered in Los Angeles County over the weekend at a Culver City hospital, officials announced Monday. The newborn also became the 114 th baby to be delivered safely since the Safe Surrender program started nearly 13 years ago, according to Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe's office. “There is no better way to start the new year then to learn of the healthy and safe surrender of a newborn baby girl,” Knabe said in a statement.
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