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Safety And Health Violations

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NEWS
April 1, 1986 | Associated Press
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, in its largest enforcement action ever, today fined Union Carbide Corp. more than $1.3 million for 221 alleged safety and health violations at its Institute, W.Va., chemical plant. The citations were issued this morning at the plant, where a chemical leak last August hospitalized six workers and sent 129 area residents to emergency rooms. The company has 15 days to contest the fines, which totaled $1,377,300.
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NEWS
September 8, 1988 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Backers of Proposition 95--the Hunger and Homelessness Funding Initiative--Tuesday kicked off their campaign for passage of the ballot measure that would raise as much as $90 million annually for housing, food and job-training programs by slapping new fines on health, safety and building code violators. Proponents say the initiative is the first comprehensive, statewide approach to dealing with the problems of hunger and homelessness that would not use any tax dollars.
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NEWS
September 8, 1988 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Backers of Proposition 95--the Hunger and Homelessness Funding Initiative--Tuesday kicked off their campaign for passage of the ballot measure that would raise as much as $90 million annually for housing, food and job-training programs by slapping new fines on health, safety and building code violators. Proponents say the initiative is the first comprehensive, statewide approach to dealing with the problems of hunger and homelessness that would not use any tax dollars.
NEWS
April 1, 1986 | Associated Press
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, in its largest enforcement action ever, today fined Union Carbide Corp. more than $1.3 million for 221 alleged safety and health violations at its Institute, W.Va., chemical plant. The citations were issued this morning at the plant, where a chemical leak last August hospitalized six workers and sent 129 area residents to emergency rooms. The company has 15 days to contest the fines, which totaled $1,377,300.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1993
Workplace Hazards Found: A General Accounting Office inspection of eight Mexican auto parts plants, or maquiladoras, operated by U.S. manufacturers turned up "safety and health violations" at each of the plants visited but found that the hazards generally were present "in the U.S. auto parts industry as well." The inspection was requested by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, which is considering the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | Bloomberg News
DeCoster Egg Farms, one of the nation's leading egg producers, on Monday agreed to pay a $2-million fine for safety and health violations found last July. Turner, Maine-based DeCoster Egg Farms was fined for violating numerous health and safety codes, including maintaining machinery without protective shields, failing to provide protective equipment for workers, refusing to pay employees in a timely fashion and forcing workers to live in unsanitary conditions.
NEWS
April 27, 1987
The owner of an East Los Angeles residential hotel pleaded no contest to eight Building and Safety and Health Code violations and was ordered to make repairs by July 22 or go to jail for six months. Salvador M. Quezada, 52, was also placed on two years' probation and ordered to pay $6,800 in fines and penalties and $1,550 in restitution to agencies that investigated the 29-room hotel, the Vinograd, at 2105-2107 E. Brooklyn Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1990
A convicted slumlord was sentenced to six months in County Jail and ordered to pay $17,552 in penalties because of the substandard conditions at two of his apartment buildings. Timothy Michael Preis, 39, of Northridge, also received three years' probation from Municipal Court Judge J. Stephen Czuleger, who further ordered Pries to end his ownership of the two buildings, at 4020 S. San Pedro St. in South Los Angeles and 2616 Idell St. in Glassell Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991
U. S. Energy Secretary James D. Watkins has approved a five-year plan to correct 193 job-safety violations identified by a special inspection team at Rockwell's Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth. Although Watkins approved the plan only last week, some actions have already been taken to correct deficiencies found at the lab, where Rockwell operates the Energy Technology Center under contract with the Department of Energy, said Clark Gibbs, the center's general manager.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration Friday fined John Morrell & Co. $4.33 million, the largest fine ever against a single employer, for what the agency said were hundreds of "willful safety and health violations" at the meatpacker's Sioux Falls, S.D., plant. OSHA said Morrell knew as early as 1984 that working conditions at the plant were causing "serious and sometimes disabling cumulative trauma injuries" but did nothing to change those conditions.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | Associated Press
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration today fined John Morrell & Co. $4.33 million, the largest fine ever against a single employer, for what the agency said were hundreds of "willful safety and health violations" at the meatpacker's Sioux Falls, S.D., plant. OSHA said Morrell knew as early as 1984 that working conditions at the plant were causing "serious and sometimes disabling cumulative trauma injuries" but did nothing to change those conditions.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | From Associated Press
The federal government is taking over enforcement of much of North Carolina's worker safety program, a move some welcomed Wednesday as a way to help avert another disaster similar to the poultry plant fire that killed 25 people and injured 56 last month in Hamlet. Wednesday's action marked the first time in the 21-year history of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that the federal government has taken over part of a state's responsibility for enforcing worker safety laws.
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