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Safety Devices

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REAL ESTATE
September 19, 1993 | Special to The Times
QUESTION: I live in a senior complex along with several of my friends. Frequently we go back and forth to each other's apartments to visit, so most of the time when there is a knock at my door it is a familiar face. Last month however, when I opened the door I was surprised by a man trying to force his way inside. After I let out a big scream, he ran away. That day I reported the incident to the manager and requested him to install a peephole and chain lock in my door.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
After years of delays, U.S. safety regulators have announced that backup cameras will be required in new U.S. vehicles by May 2018. The move comes just a day before a court of appeals was to hear arguments in a lawsuit brought against the government by safety groups and families of children injured and killed in back-over accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced Monday that "rear-visibility technology" must be standard equipment in all vehicles under 10,000 pounds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more than 100 big rigs and tow trucks parked along the street outside the Oxnard Baptist Church, friends and family came to say goodbye Wednesday to 31-year-old Rodney Allen McCarty, who was killed after his truck was struck by a train. Grieving the sudden loss of a man known for his warmth and charm, many asked if his life could have been saved if the railroad crossing where McCarty was killed had been marked by warning devices.
AUTOS
September 30, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Closing arguments in a $20-million lawsuit against Toyota Motor Corp. started Monday with attorneys painting widely different portraits of a horrific 2009 wreck that killed an Upland woman. A Los Angeles County Superior Court jury will decide whether Toyota was negligent by not including a particular safety device on Noriko Uno's 2006 Camry, or whether the crash resulted from her poor driving. Uno's car sped to 100 mph before hitting a telephone pole and a tree. The case, expected to go to the jury Tuesday afternoon, will set the direction for hundreds of similar lawsuits against the automaker over incidents of unintended acceleration.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1995 | Jack Searles
Med-Design Corp., a Philadelphia-based producer of medical safety devices that has a subsidiary in Ventura, has applied for patents on two newly developed instruments designed to reduce accidental needle injuries among health-care workers. Med-Design owns MDC Research Ltd., a manufacturing and development unit that in July leased a large plant on Ventura's Bunsen Avenue. One of the patent applications involves a retracting needle that delivers solutions intravenously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001
Philip Edward Rollhaus Jr., 66, the founder, chief executive and chairman of Quixote Corp., died July 31 of cancer at his Palm Beach, Fla., home. Rollhaus founded Energy Absorption Systems in 1969. He developed the company's patented highway cushions, which are designed to protect cars in crashes. The holding company changed its name to Quixote in 1969 to reflect its interests in optical discs and court-reporting machines.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | ADRIENNE WIGDORTZ ANDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Adrienne Wigdortz Anderson is a Valley-based writer
Thirty seconds. That was all it took for Mark Zeolla of Calabasas to get Popsicles from the garage freezer for 3-year-old Christina and 13-month-old Ciara. Thirty seconds was all it took for Ciara to drink from the oil-filled lamp on the living room table. When Zeolla returned, Ciara was gasping for breath. A year later, she's fine. But, Zeolla remembered, "it was traumatic seeing my daughter almost die in my arms." He and his wife, Cindy, consider themselves safety-conscious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Fire Department helicopter in which three firefighters and a young accident victim were killed in a crash last March was not equipped with helmets, tether straps or other safety devices to protect the crew and victim, according to a department report released Tuesday. While the long-delayed report on the department's deadliest air disaster did not explore whether the safety equipment would have saved lives, critics said sturdier seats and restraints would have made a difference.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political groundswell for stricter gun control continued to build Tuesday as the Senate voted overwhelmingly to require that all handguns be sold with trigger locks or other child safety devices--a measure roundly rejected less than a year ago. The Senate also voted to curb the distribution of bomb-making information on the Internet, to limit Internet sales of alcohol to minors and to take new steps to crack down on gang violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Fire Department helicopter that killed three firefighters and a young accident victim in a crash last March was not equipped with helmets, tether straps or other safety devices to protect the crew and victim, according to a department report released Tuesday. Although the long-delayed report on the department's deadliest air disaster did not explore whether the safety equipment would have saved lives, critics said sturdier seats and restraints would have made a difference.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2012 | DAVID LAZARUS
Caitlin Sandoval was playing last month with her two young daughters on a futon in her San Jacinto apartment. She left them for just a moment to go to the bathroom. What happened next was every parent's worst nightmare. "I returned to the room and saw my youngest daughter at the window with her arms limp at her sides," Sandoval, 24, recalled. "Then I saw the cord around her neck. " The 14-month-old child was soon pronounced dead at the hospital. Cause of death: accidental strangulation.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Three skiers died Sunday in a Washington avalanche.  Another was saved by a new safety device called a flotation air bag -- equipment tucked inside a skier's backpack, ready for deployment in case of an avalanche.  On Sunday, an avalanche swept four skiers about a quarter of a mile down an out-of-bounds canyon on the back side of Stevens Pass in the Cascade Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seattle. Professional skier Elyse Saugstad was saved by the inflatable safety device, believed to be the second time in recent weeks the portable air bags saved a life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2010 | By Rick Rojas and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The school bus in which 21 people were injured when it flipped on its side after being broadsided by a speeding BMW in Boyle Heights is among hundreds of buses transporting students in the Los Angeles Unified School District that are not equipped with seat belts. The school bus is a reflection of the district's aging fleet, in which two-thirds of the buses still lack restraints, according to district figures. Since July 2005, school buses built to carry more than 16 passengers have been required to have three-point seat belts ?
NATIONAL
July 21, 2010 | By Julie Cart and Rong-Gong Lin II
BP officials knew about a problem on a crucial well safety device at least three months before the catastrophic April 20 explosion in the Gulf of Mexico but failed to repair it, according to testimony Tuesday from the company's well manager. Ronald Sepulvado testified that he was aware of a leak on a control pod atop the well's blowout preventer and notified his supervisor in Houston about the problem, which Sepulvado didn't consider crucial. The 450-ton hydraulic device, designed to prevent gas or oil from blasting out of the drill hole, failed during the disaster, which killed 11 men on the Deepwater Horizon rig and set off the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Relatives and neighbors of a 10-year-old South Gate boy who was struck and killed in a crosswalk Saturday called on city officials to install more safety devices at the busy intersection. Ricardo Mercado was killed while crossing Tweedy Boulevard at San Vincente Avenue with his mother and two sisters at 11:24 a.m. They were on their way home after buying Popsicles at a nearby store. A woman driving a Volkswagen SUV was making a left turn from San Vincente Avenue onto Tweedy Boulevard when she struck the family, said Sgt. Tim Williams of the South Gate Police Department.
WORLD
April 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A methane gas explosion that killed 108 people at a Siberian coal mine was caused by a deliberate blockage of safety equipment, investigators said Monday. Konstantin Pulikovsky, head of the industrial watchdog Rostekhnadzor, which is investigating the March 19 disaster, said the mine's methane gas detection system had been blocked, allowing the gas to build up to unsafe levels. "The automatic system showing methane levels was rendered nonoperational ...
BUSINESS
July 25, 1995 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
MDC Research Ltd., a subsidiary of Philadelphia-based Med-Design Corp., began setting up a manufacturing plant this month at a 26,000-square-foot facility on Bunsen Avenue in Ventura. The facility will be used for the production of medical safety devices. Med-Design holds U. S. and international patents on safety devices intended to reduce the risk of accidental needle pricks during medical treatment.
NEWS
June 11, 1986
Criminal charges were filed against an Altadena construction firm and two employees in connection with an October, 1985, downtown Los Angeles building site accident that left one worker dead and another seriously injured. Charged in the complaint filed by the city attorney's office are Charles Pankow Builders; field superintendent Bill James Hughs, 30, of Lakewood, and forklift operator's foreman James Campbell Crane, 41, of La Mirada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2004 | H.G. Reza, Christine Hanley and Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writers
A Mission Viejo company that sought Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona's help selling a high-tech police tool steered money from at least nine investors, and perhaps dozens more, into the sheriff's 2002 campaign fund -- in some cases without the donors' knowledge. The practice raises serious ethical questions and may be illegal, experts said.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2003 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The federal government issued its first ratings of car seats for children Wednesday and called for improvements in a life-saving product many parents have trouble installing correctly. Only three models earned a straight-A grade in all five categories the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration rates to judge convenience and ease of use. Two were Graco Comfort Sport models, and the other was an Evenflo Tribute.
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