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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1995 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wanda Sapp often visited movie sets to watch her daughter perform stunts. She never dreamed she'd watch her daughter die. Sapp and two of her other children were present in November, when Sonja Davis fell to her death while working as a stunt double on the upcoming Eddie Murphy film "Vampire in Brooklyn." The family is suing Paramount Studios and Eddie Murphy Productions for $10 million, alleging that the film crew failed to provide proper safety equipment.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Brian E. Clark
Snow has been falling in buckets all over the West, but nowhere more so than on the rugged peaks along the British Columbia border with Alberta. In a normal year, the Columbia Mountains near Revelstoke would have received roughly 8 feet of snow by now. But Mother Nature has been overly generous, dropping 14 feet in December alone (5 feet more than the previous record for the month) for a whopping total of 23 feet so far this season. This isn't the "Sierra Cement" that sometimes lands on California's slopes, especially at lower elevations.
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NEWS
December 12, 1994 | JEFF BRAZIL and SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patricia Saveall can still hear the words from the airport official who called that day: "The plane has gone down." The young mother screamed so loudly she awakened her 8-year-old daughter. "I told her Daddy had been in an accident, but we didn't know how bad it was," she said. Hours later, she learned how bad: No one had survived the crash.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court reversed course and ruled that the nation's automakers can be sued for failing to install the most-effective safety equipment in their vehicles. The unanimous decision Wednesday clears the way for a California man to sue Mazda Motor Corp. because his family's 1993 minivan did not have a lap and shoulder belt in a middle rear seat. His wife, Thanh Williamson, was sitting in that rear seat wearing just a lap belt when their car was struck head-on on a Utah highway.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When natural disasters strike, the common wisdom is that somewhere, somehow, mobile homes are going to be washed out, blown apart or crumpled. The common wisdom is true. Largely because of shoddy installation and other lax practices, millions of Americans live in factory-built homes that may be unsafe or, at the least, far less safe than conventional single-family houses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990 | GEORGE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly obtained information about a devastating blast at Mobil's Torrance refinery reveals that human error caused an explosion that has triggered two years of legal, political and regulatory battles for the nation's fifth-largest industrial corporation. A federal safety report says that in the days before the accident, Mobil failed to follow its own written procedures, which call for alarms to be working during refinery operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1990
If anyone in Orange County thought the death of a 19-year-old Dana Point resident last June in a skateboarding accident was a freak occurrence that couldn't happen again, consider what happened this month to a 19-year-old Westminster man. He became the county's second fatality resulting from a skateboard rider taking a tow behind a vehicle. Moral of the story: Skateboarding can be lots of fun; skateboarding also can be dangerous. In fact, the National Skateboarding Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990
Just recently the death of a 19-year-old Dana Point resident caught my attention. The cause of death was a "freak" skateboarding accident. It wasn't such a "freak" accident because it happened again. This time to a 19-year-old Westminster man. These fatalities prove that while skateboarding is fun, it also can be a dangerous sport. The use of safety equipment reduces the chance of injury. Many riders don't realize the importance of taking precautions. The use of equipment such as helmets, elbow pads and knee pads is "uncool" and considered "wimpy."
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | NELL HENDERSON, THE WASHINGTON POST
Federal safety officials indicated Friday that they may step up the pressure on the government to require the use of infant seats on airline flights. "We're considering recommendations in that area," National Transportation Safety Board member Joseph T. Nall said after presiding over four days of hearings on the July crash here of United Airlines Flight 232. More than 10,000 infants fly in the United States every day, the airline industry estimates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | HELAINE OLEN
Members of Anaheim's professional roller hockey team put on a demonstration Monday for students at La Veta Elementary School in Orange on the importance of wearing safety equipment while skating or biking. "I do want to tell you kids that if you skate or bike, wear protective gear," said Stefan Desjardins, a player on the Anaheim Bullfrogs, which are scheduled to debut July 2 at Anaheim Arena. "Sometimes it doesn't look so good, but you'll be grateful when you fall."
BUSINESS
July 22, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
One of Disneyland's oldest attractions, the Alice in Wonderland ride, has been closed since last week while workers install safety barriers recommended by California work-safety inspectors. Park officials said they hope to reopen the ride in the next few weeks. Disney officials said the Anaheim park voluntarily closed the ride July 15 after California Department of Occupational Safety and Health inspectors pointed out that it lacked handrails needed for maintenance crews who work on an elevated segment of the ride.
HEALTH
July 6, 2009 | Francesca Lunzer Kritz
Don't let savings this summer come at the expense of safety. "Summer is a great time for physical activity, exploring and family trips, but precautions and safety equipment such as sunscreen and bicycle helmets are musts," says Dr. Lynne McCullough, head of the emergency department at UCLA Medical Center. We've put together a list of free or low-cost safety savings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Joel Rubin
Who knew the badge, the holster and the iconic dark blue threads worn by Los Angeles police officers could make punching the clock so complicated? A federal judge ruled this week that Los Angeles Police Department officers should be paid for the time it takes them to put on and take off their uniforms and safety equipment, a decision that could cost the city millions of dollars in back pay and higher salaries. In a 39-page ruling, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2008 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Three airlines that operate at Los Angeles International Airport will install safety equipment in their cockpits designed to reduce runway near misses, the Federal Aviation Administration announced Wednesday. The FAA will provide $600,000 each to Skywest Airlines, US Airways and Southwest Airlines to help pay for cockpit systems that show pilots their precise locations at airports and provide them with information about the runways they are entering, crossing or departing from.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Eighty Santa Rosa police officers will receive an average of $2,000 each for unpaid time they spent getting ready for work. The officers will get the money as part of a settlement of a lawsuit they filed against the city seeking pay for the time it takes to put on and take off their uniforms, bulletproof vests and other safety equipment. The $240,000 settlement was unanimously approved by the City Council on Tuesday. The officers had sought $4.4 million in their lawsuit filed in federal court in November 2006.
WORLD
April 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A methane gas explosion that killed 108 people at a Siberian coal mine was caused by a deliberate blockage of safety equipment, investigators said Monday. Konstantin Pulikovsky, head of the industrial watchdog Rostekhnadzor, which is investigating the March 19 disaster, said the mine's methane gas detection system had been blocked, allowing the gas to build up to unsafe levels. "The automatic system showing methane levels was rendered nonoperational ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995
The vision of two young friends happily paddling down the Ventura River is the image of our California lifestyle, and one we should be proud of ("Rafting on the River," photos, April 19). What is wrong with this picture is that these boys are not wearing life vests, and from the photo at the top of the page it is apparent that they did not have any safety equipment, such as flotation cushions, with them. Every year we read in The Times about our youth drowning in boating and river accidents, and all too often these tragedies could have been prevented by taking a basic and required ounce of prevention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
A flood of last-minute suggestions about how to make television news gathering safer may slow implementation of the nation's first safety rules for TV trucks, state officials said Friday. More than 100 people submitted testimony to state Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board members who met Thursday to hammer out safety requirements for microwave vans used for news show "live shots."
TRAVEL
February 11, 2007 | Judi Dash
Safeguarding the health and well-being of you and yours gets an assist from these new items, all of which have been tested by the writer. --- Safe and Sound True to its name, the Ready Freddy Emergency/Survival Pack is stocked with aids for a plethora of emergencies: minor injuries, power outages, vehicle breakdowns, bad weather, even boredom. (There's a deck of cards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2006 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
Several radar upgrades that air traffic controllers say are essential to help identify potential collisions on the ground at Los Angeles International Airport are months behind schedule. In one case, equipment that eliminates blind spots and false alarms that plague an existing collision-alert system will not be operational until 2009.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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