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Safety Equipment

AUTOS
August 7, 2002 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators are requiring auto makers to start equipping new cars and light trucks with some type of tire pressure monitor. But what about all those passenger vehicles out there that aren't new? Retrofitting with one of the systems being required on new vehicles can be prohibitively expensive, costing hundreds of dollars. If you don't have anti-lock braking, one type of system won't work anyhow. A company in Fullerton, Tire Guard USA, may have an affordable answer. Tire Guard (www.
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NATIONAL
July 13, 2002 | From Associated Press
NASA's shuttle fleet was grounded Friday for at least two more months because of small fuel-line cracks that the space agency fears could splinter into dangerous chunks of metal. "We're not going to fly until we're satisfied that we understand this problem," shuttle program manager Ron Dittemore said. At the same time, NASA is being criticized by its own inspector general's office for failing to provide adequate safety oversight over shuttle launching preparations by the contractor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
A bill requiring that gun safety locks be certified as safe before they can be sold in California was passed by the Senate on Monday and sent to the Assembly, where its approval is expected. The vote was 22-9. Under the bill (SB 1670) by Sen. Jack Scott (D-Altadena), trigger locks and other devices would be subject to approval by the state Department of Justice before they could enter the marketplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
A flood of last-minute suggestions about how to make television news gathering safer may slow implementation of the nation's first safety rules for TV trucks, state officials said Friday. More than 100 people submitted testimony to state Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board members who met Thursday to hammer out safety requirements for microwave vans used for news show "live shots."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2002 | KURT STREETER and GARRETT THEROLF, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 100 emergency exit hatches across the MTA's subway system will be fitted with new springs to decrease the amount of force needed to open the heavy doors during an evacuation, authorities said. Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials said that if an emergency such as a fire, crash or terrorist attack were to occur on the 17-mile Red Line, some passengers might not be strong enough to push the steel doors open and climb to the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles building officials, who allowed county Supervisor Gloria Molina and her husband to skirt building codes on a retaining wall at their house, said they are now investigating whether the couple broke the law by building a swimming pool there without a permit and without installing required safety equipment.
TRAVEL
February 10, 2002 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
On a typical winter Saturday, Dr. Chris Hummel and his colleagues at Mammoth Hospital in Mammoth Lakes see about two dozen patients "from the mountain," as he calls the skiers and snowboarders injured on the nearby slopes. It's nothing out of the ordinary for him to treat a broken leg, a dislocated shoulder, a few sprained knees, a concussion and a back problem during one of his shifts, he says.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fighter jets built for the Pentagon are routinely inspected with ultrasound to detect hidden flaws that may develop in lightweight composite materials used to make such critical parts as the wings and tail. But only visual maintenance inspections were required for the Airbus A300 jetliner that crashed last month in New York after its composite tail fin broke off. The adequacy of visual inspections has become a focus of the National Transportation Safety Board's investigation into the Nov.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Auburn University's Canine Detection Training Center is ramping up for the war on bioterrorism. Cipro maker Bayer Corp. is running its plant around the clock to churn out 200 million pills during the next three months. Manufacturers of biometric identification systems have conducted demonstrations on Capitol Hill in hopes of convincing lawmakers to put their high-tech devices at airports and along the borders. And now, anthrax test kits are coming to hardware stores.
NEWS
October 23, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal safety officials are asking the public to help them crack down on hazardous automatic security gates that entangle thousands of children and adults each year, causing serious injury and even death. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said in an alert being issued today that many older gates lack safety features, such as automatic sensing devices, that could prevent people from becoming trapped.
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