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Safety Equipment

SPORTS
October 18, 2001 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASCAR changed its position on head and neck restraints for its drivers Wednesday from a recommendation to a mandate. Starting with this weekend's Winston Cup race at Talladega Superspeedway, NASCAR will require all drivers in its three top series--Winston Cup, Busch Grand National and Craftsman Truck--to wear either a HANS or a Hutchens device.
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NEWS
October 16, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a year ago, a Chicago executive approached John Rivers about making a parachute for office workers in high-rise buildings. It seemed like an odd request, but Rivers, who runs a small aircraft manufacturing company in Michigan, researched it anyway. "Then I made the worst decision of my life and decided not to go to market with it," said Rivers, president and chief executive of Destiny Aircraft. Since the Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2001 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stars of this year's home remodeling show in Anaheim are not the usual kitchen cabinets, hot tubs and shutters. Gas masks, "trauma kits" and other survival gear are getting top billing, suddenly made household items by American angst. Organizers homed in on a "Survival Expo" theme after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, said John Blanchette, spokesman for the 25th annual Home Remodel & Decorating Show that opened Friday at the Anaheim Convention Center.
NEWS
October 5, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brent Shapiro, a totally sane Venice comedy writer, doesn't think for a minute that gas masks will save him in the event of a biological or chemical attack. Indeed, he was so mortified about his irrational impulse to buy some that when he entered a military surplus store last week he couldn't even get up his courage to ask for them. A woman next to him had to.
SPORTS
August 24, 2001 | Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt's longtime car owner reacted angrily Thursday to seat-belt maker Bill Simpson's claim that he repeatedly warned the late driver that belts in his car were not properly installed. "In the 16 years that Dale and I were together, Dale never said anything to me about any conversation with Bill Simpson or any of Bill's representatives regarding the installation of the seat belts," car owner Richard Childress said at Bristol, Tenn., site of this weekend's Winston Cup racing.
SPORTS
August 24, 2001 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A headstrong behemoth, NASCAR revealed the results Tuesday of its six-month investigation into the death of Dale Earnhardt but failed to provide much satisfaction. There was no concrete reason cited for Earnhardt's death, although heavy play was given to the seat belt that broke in Earnhardt's car during his accident on the last lap of the Daytona 500 Feb. 18. In other words, business as usual.
SPORTS
August 22, 2001 | Associated Press
Six months, 54 experts and $1 million later, there are no definitive answers to all the questions about stock car driver Dale Earnhardt's fatal crash. Still, NASCAR, the body that sanctions and runs Winston Cup racing, keeps coming back to the broken seat belt. NASCAR's investigation determined Tuesday that a broken seat belt was a factor in Earnhardt's fatal wreck on the last lap of the Daytona 500 on Feb. 18, but its report does not recommend widespread changes to improve safety.
SPORTS
August 20, 2001 | Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. wore a head-and-neck-restraint system in the Pepsi 400 on Sunday, six months after his father died of a skull fracture in a crash at the Daytona 500. It's the first time Earnhardt Jr. has raced with the safety device in his brief Winston Cup career and came two days before NASCAR is scheduled to release a report on the fatal accident involving Dale Earnhardt Sr. "It hurts a little," Earnhardt Jr. said during a rain delay. "It's uncomfortable but I'm going to make it work."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 10 months after a preschooler was trapped beneath the ride and severely brain-damaged, Disneyland reopened its vastly overhauled Roger Rabbit's Car Toon Spin on Thursday afternoon. While saying the ride was safe from the start, the amusement park went beyond state orders to fix problem areas. The state-ordered additions include automatic latching doors and sensor-equipped bumpers that sit 2 1/2 inches off the ground so that riders cannot be trapped underneath.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attendance at the city's only skate park, in Encino, has dropped about 50% since the construction of a 10-foot security fence allowed officials to begin enforcing a city requirement that skateboarders wear protective gear. Kevin Regan, superintendent of operations for the Valley region of the Department of Recreation and Parks, said he is not concerned about the drop in park usage. "It's become a benefit for those using the facility," he said.
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