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Safety Equipment

SPORTS
August 20, 2001 | Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. wore a head-and-neck-restraint system in the Pepsi 400 on Sunday, six months after his father died of a skull fracture in a crash at the Daytona 500. It's the first time Earnhardt Jr. has raced with the safety device in his brief Winston Cup career and came two days before NASCAR is scheduled to release a report on the fatal accident involving Dale Earnhardt Sr. "It hurts a little," Earnhardt Jr. said during a rain delay. "It's uncomfortable but I'm going to make it work."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 10 months after a preschooler was trapped beneath the ride and severely brain-damaged, Disneyland reopened its vastly overhauled Roger Rabbit's Car Toon Spin on Thursday afternoon. While saying the ride was safe from the start, the amusement park went beyond state orders to fix problem areas. The state-ordered additions include automatic latching doors and sensor-equipped bumpers that sit 2 1/2 inches off the ground so that riders cannot be trapped underneath.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attendance at the city's only skate park, in Encino, has dropped about 50% since the construction of a 10-foot security fence allowed officials to begin enforcing a city requirement that skateboarders wear protective gear. Kevin Regan, superintendent of operations for the Valley region of the Department of Recreation and Parks, said he is not concerned about the drop in park usage. "It's become a benefit for those using the facility," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | Times staff and wire reports
Attendance at L.A.'s only skate park, in Encino, has dropped about 50% since officials began enforcing a city ordinance requiring skateboarders to wear protective gear. Pedlow Field Skate Park, which opened in February, was drawing several hundred skaters a week, but many refused to wear the required helmets or knee and elbow pads despite requests from park rangers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city is ready to crack down on people not wearing safety gear at Los Angeles' only skate park. For more than two months, the city Department of Recreation and Parks has tried to coax skateboarders at the Encino park to wear helmets, kneepads and elbow pads as required by a city ordinance. Signs, threats, gentle pleading--nothing has worked to get the skateboarders to conform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city is ready to crack down on people not wearing safety gear at L.A.'s only skate park. For more than two months, the city Department of Recreation and Parks has tried to coax skateboarders at the Encino park to wear helmets, kneepads and elbow pads as required under a city ordinance. Signs, threats, gentle pleading--nothing has worked to get the skateboarders to conform, officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man in the pinstripe suit, fingers bare, levels his gun and tries to shoot. Nothing happens. "I do not have the ring on!" he yells. In a flash, he slips a silvery ring over his middle finger and grabs the gun. The weapon springs to life, firing six rounds in a blaze of noise and smoke. For a moment, Daniel Hinerfeld could almost pass for the hero of a sci-fi comic strip.
SPORTS
February 26, 2001 | From Wire Reports
Increased safety dominated conversation in days leading to Sunday's Dura-Lube 400 at North Carolina Speedway at Rockingham, N.C., but many of the NASCAR drivers calling for it still weren't willing to use a controversial new device in the race. The HANS (Head and Neck Support) device received prominent mention after Dale Earnhardt was killed in a crash in the Daytona 500 a week ago Sunday. The U-shaped device is designed to protect drivers from head and neck injuries.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dale Earnhardt died after his seat belt broke, NASCAR announced Friday. The disclosure opened a new investigative avenue into the death of the legendary racing driver, who was killed Sunday when his car hit the Daytona Speedway wall at an estimated 180 mph. Until now, speculation about Earnhardt's death had centered on the fact that he had not been wearing enough head and neck support to withstand the near head-on collision. "We don't know how, why or when," said Mike Helton, NASCAR president.
SPORTS
February 20, 2001 | Associated Press
On the day after Dale Earnhardt's death, several NASCAR teams ordered a safety device designed to protect drivers from head and neck injuries. The Head And Neck Safety (HANS) device was designed to lessen the pressure on the most vulnerable part of the body--the neck and base of the skull--in the type of crashes that killed Earnhardt and three other NASCAR drivers in the last year. On Monday morning, several NASCAR teams contacted Hubbard/Downing Inc.
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