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Safety Equipment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city is ready to crack down on people not wearing safety gear at Los Angeles' only skate park. For more than two months, the city Department of Recreation and Parks has tried to coax skateboarders at the Encino park to wear helmets, kneepads and elbow pads as required by a city ordinance. Signs, threats, gentle pleading--nothing has worked to get the skateboarders to conform.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city is ready to crack down on people not wearing safety gear at L.A.'s only skate park. For more than two months, the city Department of Recreation and Parks has tried to coax skateboarders at the Encino park to wear helmets, kneepads and elbow pads as required under a city ordinance. Signs, threats, gentle pleading--nothing has worked to get the skateboarders to conform, officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man in the pinstripe suit, fingers bare, levels his gun and tries to shoot. Nothing happens. "I do not have the ring on!" he yells. In a flash, he slips a silvery ring over his middle finger and grabs the gun. The weapon springs to life, firing six rounds in a blaze of noise and smoke. For a moment, Daniel Hinerfeld could almost pass for the hero of a sci-fi comic strip.
SPORTS
February 26, 2001 | From Wire Reports
Increased safety dominated conversation in days leading to Sunday's Dura-Lube 400 at North Carolina Speedway at Rockingham, N.C., but many of the NASCAR drivers calling for it still weren't willing to use a controversial new device in the race. The HANS (Head and Neck Support) device received prominent mention after Dale Earnhardt was killed in a crash in the Daytona 500 a week ago Sunday. The U-shaped device is designed to protect drivers from head and neck injuries.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dale Earnhardt died after his seat belt broke, NASCAR announced Friday. The disclosure opened a new investigative avenue into the death of the legendary racing driver, who was killed Sunday when his car hit the Daytona Speedway wall at an estimated 180 mph. Until now, speculation about Earnhardt's death had centered on the fact that he had not been wearing enough head and neck support to withstand the near head-on collision. "We don't know how, why or when," said Mike Helton, NASCAR president.
SPORTS
February 20, 2001 | Associated Press
On the day after Dale Earnhardt's death, several NASCAR teams ordered a safety device designed to protect drivers from head and neck injuries. The Head And Neck Safety (HANS) device was designed to lessen the pressure on the most vulnerable part of the body--the neck and base of the skull--in the type of crashes that killed Earnhardt and three other NASCAR drivers in the last year. On Monday morning, several NASCAR teams contacted Hubbard/Downing Inc.
SPORTS
February 19, 2001 | MIKE BIANCHI, ORLANDO SENTINEL
Dale Earnhardt was considered the meanest, toughest racer in the history of motorsports, but it appears he died Sunday the same way so many of his peers perished: From massive head injuries resulting from a head-on collision with a concrete wall. Earnhardt, the seven-time Winston Cup champion and one of the most charismatic stars in his sport's history, is believed to have died instantly on a last-lap crash at the Daytona 500.
SPORTS
February 19, 2001 | Mike Kupper
Just the other day, a wire service story out of Daytona Beach, Fla., on how stock car racing could be made safer, had a number of Winston Cup drivers saying, basically, that safety was their problem, not NASCAR's, and that they certainly didn't want the racing organization telling them what precautions they had to take. "When I started driving, we weren't even using seat belts," the retired Richard Petty, NASCAR's greatest star and now a car owner, was quoted as saying. Petty is lucky.
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | ED HINTON, TRIBUNE MOTOR SPORTS WRITER
About the Project This is the result of six months of research and reporting by Tribune Auto Race Writer Ed Hinton, with help from staffers at other Tribune papers, among them Darin Esper of the Los Angeles Times. It sheds new light on the decline of traditional fatalism among race drivers and the need for more research and action to prevent the violent deaths the sport has come to accept.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL and TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stepping up its campaign to be seen as a safe and environmentally sensitive truck builder, Ford Motor Co. said Tuesday that it has developed a "mildly hybrid" propulsion system for its Explorer sport-utility and a suite of safety features that will be available on its entire SUV line by 2004. The Explorer, Ford's best-selling SUV, gets the safety package with the new 2002 model that will hit showrooms by early spring.
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