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NEWS
October 22, 1986
The president of a drilling firm pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter in the October, 1985, death of an employee in an elevator shaft hole at a downtown Los Angeles construction site. Under terms of the plea bargain, Michael Maggio, 29, of Maggio Drilling Inc. of West Covina, will be sentenced to a maximum of 90 days in County Jail, Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph Shidler said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Susan Denley
After aerialist Nik Wallenda crossed a gorge near the Grand Canyon via tightrope on Sunday, he came home with more than the kind of souvenir T-shirt one might pick up near a major national park. Besides the publicity that such a feat attracts -- it was broadcast on Discovery Channel, after all -- and besides his gratitude at making the 22-minute walk without incident (he wore no safety harness and prayed aloud a lot during the journey, as well as with preacher Joel Osteen ahead of time)
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NEWS
February 18, 2012 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Anything that makes flying with children easier is worth a look, although this one is pricey. The QuickSmart Backpack Stroller features a streamlined design, with a lightweight but sturdy aluminum frame, five-point safety harness and retractable hood but few other bells or whistles. It folds down to about 23-by-12-by-13 inches. Stashed in the included backpack, the 11-pound stroller meets most airlines' carry-on dimension limits, fitting in the overhead bin, although smaller commuter planes may be an exception.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013
New focus on art theft As far as crimes go, the heist was a work of art. On March 18, 1990, two men in police uniforms talked their way into Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, where they tied up the security guards. After disabling the security cameras, they made off with 13 works valued at $500 million. The theft has flummoxed investigators for 23 years - a streak the FBI is now asking the public to help break. On Monday, officials revealed that they think they know the identities of the men who took the art - which included works by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Degas - and that the art may still be in the Northeast.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA -- High-wire artist Nik Wallenda fulfilled his dream of walking across Niagara Falls on a tightrope Friday, navigating through thick spray, strong winds and some close encounters with birds to become the first to complete the walk -- albeit wearing a safety harness -- in more than 100 years. Wallenda began his walk from Terrapin Point on the U.S. side of the falls and emerged 34 minutes later through a cloud of mist on the Canadian side, to howls and cheers from hundreds of people who had lined the streets for hours.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Susan Denley
After aerialist Nik Wallenda crossed a gorge near the Grand Canyon via tightrope on Sunday, he came home with more than the kind of souvenir T-shirt one might pick up near a major national park. Besides the publicity that such a feat attracts -- it was broadcast on Discovery Channel, after all -- and besides his gratitude at making the 22-minute walk without incident (he wore no safety harness and prayed aloud a lot during the journey, as well as with preacher Joel Osteen ahead of time)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013
New focus on art theft As far as crimes go, the heist was a work of art. On March 18, 1990, two men in police uniforms talked their way into Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, where they tied up the security guards. After disabling the security cameras, they made off with 13 works valued at $500 million. The theft has flummoxed investigators for 23 years - a streak the FBI is now asking the public to help break. On Monday, officials revealed that they think they know the identities of the men who took the art - which included works by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Degas - and that the art may still be in the Northeast.
NEWS
October 25, 2010 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
It's been a busy year for Belmont Park and it's about to get busier. By the end of 2010, the San Diego seaside amusement park will have added three attractions that bundle big thrills into small packages while putting visitors in control of each experience. The prototype Octotron flat ride, which will make its debut by the end of the year, will simulate a looping roller coaster experience over an undulating Himalayan-style track . ( Watch a video of this jaw-dropping ride)
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman
As Nik Wallenda prepared for his high-wire walk over Niagara Falls on Friday, the big question among stunt fans wasn't whether Wallenda would succeed. It was whether Wallenda would dump the safety harness and tether that ABC demanded he wear for the prime-time event. And what better place to go for an opinion than the arbiter of all things daredevilish than the Daredevil Museum on the U.S. side of the falls, where owner Mark DiFrancesco was betting on the 33-year-old Wallenda tossing the safety device when he's out over the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Nik Wallenda, the man known as "King of the High Wire," will venture into Evel Knievel territory this summer when he makes a daring high-wire walk across the Grand Canyon. And those curious to see if he makes it will be able to watch the whole thing live on Discovery. To make things more interesting, Wallenda doesn't plan to use a safety harness or net. One wrong step and it's 1,500 feet straight down to the Little Colorado River. The daredevil made the announcement on NBC's "Today" on Monday morning, telling Matt Lauer that the Grand Canyon was "another one on the bucket list" of places he's wanted to traverse via tightrope.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Nik Wallenda, the man known as "King of the High Wire," will venture into Evel Knievel territory this summer when he makes a daring high-wire walk across the Grand Canyon. And those curious to see if he makes it will be able to watch the whole thing live on Discovery. To make things more interesting, Wallenda doesn't plan to use a safety harness or net. One wrong step and it's 1,500 feet straight down to the Little Colorado River. The daredevil made the announcement on NBC's "Today" on Monday morning, telling Matt Lauer that the Grand Canyon was "another one on the bucket list" of places he's wanted to traverse via tightrope.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2012 | By Richard Simon
Fido can fetch, heel and stay. And if a New Jersey lawmaker has her way, it will be dog owners who have to obey a new law requiring them to buckle up their pets on car trips. And no, the proposal was not inspired by the often-repeated story of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's strapping the family dog's crate to the roof of the car during a 1983 vacation. Rather, the legislation stems from concern that loose pets, such as dogs riding on motorists' laps, can be "more of a distraction than a cellphone, especially if the animal is hopping from seat to seat, trying to sit on your lap, or worse, jump down by your feet," says its sponsor, Assemblywoman L. Grace Spencer, a Democrat - and dog owner.  PHOTOS: Rescued animals "I have a small dog and I know how distracting they can be when driving," she said in a statement.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA -- High-wire artist Nik Wallenda fulfilled his dream of walking across Niagara Falls on a tightrope Friday, navigating through thick spray, strong winds and some close encounters with birds to become the first to complete the walk -- albeit wearing a safety harness -- in more than 100 years. Wallenda began his walk from Terrapin Point on the U.S. side of the falls and emerged 34 minutes later through a cloud of mist on the Canadian side, to howls and cheers from hundreds of people who had lined the streets for hours.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NIAGARA FALLS, Canada - High-wire artist Nik Wallenda fulfilled his dream of walking over Niagara Falls on a wire Friday, defying predictions of naysayers who warned of everything from falcons to fierce winds toppling him as he made his way over the roaring water. As hundreds of thousands of people watched from the Canadian and U.S. sides of the falls, Wallenda gingerly walked through a thick, cold mist, becoming nearly invisible at times except for his bright red shirt and the glint of his balancing pole.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman
As Nik Wallenda prepared for his high-wire walk over Niagara Falls on Friday, the big question among stunt fans wasn't whether Wallenda would succeed. It was whether Wallenda would dump the safety harness and tether that ABC demanded he wear for the prime-time event. And what better place to go for an opinion than the arbiter of all things daredevilish than the Daredevil Museum on the U.S. side of the falls, where owner Mark DiFrancesco was betting on the 33-year-old Wallenda tossing the safety device when he's out over the water.
NEWS
February 18, 2012 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Anything that makes flying with children easier is worth a look, although this one is pricey. The QuickSmart Backpack Stroller features a streamlined design, with a lightweight but sturdy aluminum frame, five-point safety harness and retractable hood but few other bells or whistles. It folds down to about 23-by-12-by-13 inches. Stashed in the included backpack, the 11-pound stroller meets most airlines' carry-on dimension limits, fitting in the overhead bin, although smaller commuter planes may be an exception.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2012 | By Richard Simon
Fido can fetch, heel and stay. And if a New Jersey lawmaker has her way, it will be dog owners who have to obey a new law requiring them to buckle up their pets on car trips. And no, the proposal was not inspired by the often-repeated story of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's strapping the family dog's crate to the roof of the car during a 1983 vacation. Rather, the legislation stems from concern that loose pets, such as dogs riding on motorists' laps, can be "more of a distraction than a cellphone, especially if the animal is hopping from seat to seat, trying to sit on your lap, or worse, jump down by your feet," says its sponsor, Assemblywoman L. Grace Spencer, a Democrat - and dog owner.  PHOTOS: Rescued animals "I have a small dog and I know how distracting they can be when driving," she said in a statement.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NIAGARA FALLS, Canada - High-wire artist Nik Wallenda fulfilled his dream of walking over Niagara Falls on a wire Friday, defying predictions of naysayers who warned of everything from falcons to fierce winds toppling him as he made his way over the roaring water. As hundreds of thousands of people watched from the Canadian and U.S. sides of the falls, Wallenda gingerly walked through a thick, cold mist, becoming nearly invisible at times except for his bright red shirt and the glint of his balancing pole.
NEWS
October 25, 2010 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
It's been a busy year for Belmont Park and it's about to get busier. By the end of 2010, the San Diego seaside amusement park will have added three attractions that bundle big thrills into small packages while putting visitors in control of each experience. The prototype Octotron flat ride, which will make its debut by the end of the year, will simulate a looping roller coaster experience over an undulating Himalayan-style track . ( Watch a video of this jaw-dropping ride)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
A few weeks before the opening of Santa Catalina Island's zipline attraction, its designer popped a question that caught a handful of local officials and visiting journalists off guard: "Want to zip?" Bradd Morse, the president of Canopy Tours Inc., was mindful that being among the first to hurtle over rocky, cactus-filled canyons at speeds of up to 40 mph while dangling from a cable as high as 300 feet off the ground might make some people nervous. But getting these individuals -- public safety officials, mostly -- to take a ride on the Catalina Zipline Eco-Tour is all part of the plan to transform this struggling harbor community of about 3,000 people into a more prominent Southern California destination.
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