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BUSINESS
February 11, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Federal safety regulators have launched an investigation into the cause of fires in 2007 model year Toyota Camry sedans and RAV-4 sport utility vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration opened the probe after receiving six complaints of fires starting in the driver's side door of the vehicles. The agency said it appeared that the fires started in the power window master switch on the door. The agency said it was looking at about 830,000 vehicles. The Camry is typically the bestselling passenger car in America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 3, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Cars of the future will know when they're about to get hit - and how to speak up about it. U.S. auto safety regulators on Monday took the first steps toward mandating that automakers build cars that talk to one another. They would speak in short-range radio signals, trading messages that would prevent accidents on a broad scale, according to the Transportation Department. The most advanced cars today can already spot trouble ahead. They use sensors to detect cars or fixed objects ahead, and alert drivers - or, in some cases, even slam on the brakes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992
A lesson sadly learned too late by the pastor driving that ill-fated van on Sept. 20 that left eight people dead: A green light only gives you permission for passing through intersections, not protection. The right-of-way does not carry guarantees. DONNA BISHOP, Stanton
AUTOS
June 10, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Federal safety regulators have opened a probe, looking at whether airbags are deploying without warning in about 320,000 Honda Odyssey vans from the 2003 and 2004 model years. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it has received six driver complaints saying that the front air bags suddenly deployed in their vans, even though they had not been in crashes. The same problem sparked big recalls by Toyota and Chrysler. Three of the drivers said they were injured by the unexpected airbag deployment and all six said the airbags went off while they were driving on the road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first case of its kind in California, a major contractor on the Metro Rail subway project in North Hollywood has been cited and fined $1,750 for violating new worker safety regulations aimed at protecting employees of other companies working on the same job.
NEWS
June 23, 1986 | United Press International
A truck carrying dynamite to a quarry caught fire and exploded today in an industrial suburb south of Cairo, killing eight people and injuring 15 others, the Interior Ministry said. Police said the truck's driver violated safety regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1987
For 74 years California has taken pride in its commitment to high industrial-safety standards. This is no longer true. Despite opposition from business, labor and the Legislature, Gov. George Deukmejian plans to relinquish state responsibility for monitoring the safety and health of workers in private firms by vetoing funds for the program.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
Southern California Edison Co. said it would appeal a $576,000 fine by the California Public Utilities Commission for sloppy maintenance that contributed to 25 accidents resulting in death, injury and property damage. A PUC administrative law judge found that the Rosemead-based utility had violated state safety regulations more than 4,700 times from 1998 to 2000 but that most of the violations were not serious.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The 12-nation European Community today adopted sweeping safety regulations covering work with video display terminals, including periodic breaks and the right to regular eye exams. The mandatory rules also call for glare-free and swiveling screens, "adequate spacing" between characters and lines, and adjustable seats with a footrest if requested.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Federal safety regulators Tuesday slapped another big fine on Toyota Motor Corp. for failing to promptly recall cars. Toyota will pay $17.35 million for delaying a recall of Lexus RX 350 and RX 450h sport-utility vehicles because a floor mat could jam the gas pedal, causing unintended acceleration. It follows a record $48.8 million in fines two years ago, a result of three separate investigations into Toyota's handling ofautorecalls for pedal entrapment, sticky gas pedals and steering relay rod problems.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The former president of a Massey coal mine in West Virginia was charged with conspiracy to violate federal mining safety laws Wednesday, and federal authorities said he was expected to plead guilty in a widening criminal investigation that began after a 2010 explosion killed 29 miners. David C. Hughart, former president of Massey's Green Valley Resource Group, was charged in U.S. District Court in Beckley, W.Va., with a felony on allegations of tipping off mine officials in advance of federal safety inspections.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Federal safety regulators have opened a probe into the 2011 and 2012 model year Jeep Patriot, which they said may stall at high speeds without warning. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Friday it has received 12 complaints from drivers alleging incidents of engine stall in the sport-utility vehicle. Almost all of the drivers said the engine stopped while they were traveling at 65 mph or more. One complaint alleged that the incident resulted in a crash and injury.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A year after an accident at the National Championship Air Races in Reno killed 11 people and injured dozens more, officials have implemented changes that they hope will improve the safety of an event in which airplanes can reach speeds of more than 500 mph and fly as low as 50 feet above the ground. The event has been under close scrutiny since a World War II-era P-51 Mustang flown by Jimmy Leeward, a 74-year-old Florida real estate developer, plunged into the crowd , killing himself and 10 spectators.
OPINION
August 22, 2012
Re "Chevron's refinery, Richmond's peril," Opinion, Aug. 14 The Op-Ed article by activist Antonia Juhasz mischaracterized the Aug. 6 incident at Chevron Corp.'s Richmond refinery and our commitment to the health and safety of our workers and neighbors. Refineries in the San Francisco Bay Area operate under the most stringent air pollution controls in the world. Chevron complies with rigorous health, environmental and safety regulations from numerous local, state and federal agencies that oversee the refinery; in many cases, the company goes above and beyond.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
As many as 360,000 Ford Taurus sedans could be included in a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration investigation into possibly faulty accelerators. Vehicles from model years 2005 and 2006 are the subject of 14 complaints — but no reports of crashes or injuries — stemming from what drivers said were detached cruise control cables and sticking throttles. Federal safety regulators said Wednesday that some drivers said they struggled to stop their cars with their brakes and had to resort to shutting off the engine or shifting into neutral mode.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
As many as 360,000 sedans could be included in an investigation into possible faulty accelerators in Ford Tauruses conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Vehicles from model years 2005 and 2006 sparked 14 complaints - but no crashes or injuries - stemming from what drivers said were detached cruise control cables and sticking throttles. In an investigation opened Wednesday, federal safety regulators said that some drivers struggled to stop their cars with their brakes and had to resort to shutting off the engine or shifting into neutral mode.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Federal safety investigators have announced their second probe in less than a week involving fires starting in the driver's side doors of vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it had opened an investigation into reports of fires in 2006-07 Chevrolet Trailblazers manufactured by General Motors Co. Last week, the agency said it was looking into the cause of fires in 2007 model year Toyota Camry sedans and RAV-4 sport utility vehicles. In both cases, the agency said it appeared that the fires started in the power window master switch on the door.
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