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BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Report Alleges 'Safflower Fiasco': The Federal Crop Insurance Corp. allowed California farmers to insure a safflower crop that had no chance to grow in the fourth year of drought, and then paid $14.8 million for the losses, congressional investigators said. The payments include "a single indemnity payment to one farm of over $1.5 million and an average payment of $105,304," said Sen. Bob Kerrey, D-Neb.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Report Alleges 'Safflower Fiasco': The Federal Crop Insurance Corp. allowed California farmers to insure a safflower crop that had no chance to grow in the fourth year of drought, and then paid $14.8 million for the losses, congressional investigators said. The payments include "a single indemnity payment to one farm of over $1.5 million and an average payment of $105,304," said Sen. Bob Kerrey, D-Neb.
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FOOD
January 5, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I would like to know the difference between saffron and safflower. And what do these two herbs do in rice or other dishes? Answer: Saffron (Crocus sativus) is a perennial with funnel-shaped blue or purple flowers that appear in autumn. Each flower has three orange stigmas, the source of the spice. Estimates vary, but it takes somewhere between 75,000 and 250,000 stigmas to produce one pound of saffron. Since these must be collected by hand, the spice is very expensive.
FOOD
January 5, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I would like to know the difference between saffron and safflower. And what do these two herbs do in rice or other dishes? Answer: Saffron (Crocus sativus) is a perennial with funnel-shaped blue or purple flowers that appear in autumn. Each flower has three orange stigmas, the source of the spice. Estimates vary, but it takes somewhere between 75,000 and 250,000 stigmas to produce one pound of saffron. Since these must be collected by hand, the spice is very expensive.
HEALTH
March 27, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Love fries but hate the thought of artery-clogging fried food? A growing number of gourmet restaurants and foodies see a solution to this conundrum in an unlikely source ? duck fat. They consider it a healthy alternative to frying foods in pork fat, beef fat or even butter. Duck fat is high in beneficial unsaturated fats, and its chemical composition is closer to olive oil than to butter, they say. Plus, it's delicious. "I love it," said David Bazirgan, executive chef at the Fifth Floor restaurant in San Francisco.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
If you're a coffee drinker who reaches eagerly for powdered, non-dairy creamers for your morning--or afternoon, or evening--brew, thinking they're somehow better for you than milk, half-and-half or real cream, think again. That, at least, is the advice of two Nebraska researchers.
FOOD
February 22, 1996 | CHARLES PERRY
These days, some people worry about microscopic insect parts in their spices. Until this century, the worry was whether you were getting the spices at all. Unscrupulous dealers would cut spices with plausible-looking plant products--or in the case of peppercorns, with mouse droppings. Connecticut gets its nickname, the Nutmeg State, from the traveling salesmen who sold unsuspecting housewives "nutmegs" carved out of wood.
FOOD
January 20, 1999
Unless otherwise indicated, make the following assumptions in Times recipes. Butter: unsalted (sweet). Eggs: large. Flour: all-purpose. Fruit and vegetable sizes: medium. Milk: whole. Oil: vegetable oil (canola, peanut, safflower, etc.). Sugar: granulated. Glossary Baking potatoes: Starchy potatoes that are light and fluffy when cooked. Baking potatoes have rough, russet skin. Boiling potatoes: Waxy potatoes that are firm when cooked.
SCIENCE
November 11, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A Canadian study has challenged the use of corn and safflower oils as healthy substitutes for saturated animal fats, saying the oils may increase the risk of heart disease. In a paper published Monday in the Canadian Medical Assn. Journal , researchers concluded that polyunsaturated vegetable oils that were rich in omega-6 linoleic acid, but relatively poor in omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid, were not associated with beneficial effects on heart health. Specifically, authors said a review of recent research suggested that though omega-6 linoleic acid lowered serum cholesterol levels, it also seemed to increase the risk of coronary artery diseases.
FOOD
February 24, 1999
Key to Times Style Unless otherwise indicated, make the following assumptions in Times recipes. Butter: Unsalted (sweet). Eggs: Large. Flour: All-purpose. Fruit and vegetable sizes: Onions and other items are assumed to be medium. Milk: Whole. Oil: Vegetable oil (canola, peanut, safflower, etc.). Sugar: Granulated. Glossary Mince: To chop extremely fine. Pasilla chile: A slender, blackish, fairly hot dried chile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1986 | REGINALD SMITH, Times Staff Writer
In the next few days, Carroll Vaniman will harvest his last row of safflower plants, maneuver his aging combines off the fields and end 31 years of farming in Simi Valley. His retirement will mark the end an era for a city that once was a hub of agriculture. Vaniman, 70, is the last big farmer in Simi Valley.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | MIMI AVINS
To appreciate one of the unsung virtues of summer in Southern California, just ask anyone who grew up in the Midwest, South or Northeast about the mosquito attacks they suffered when the weather turned warm. This area is as bug-free as they come, which is to say, not completely.
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