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OPINION
June 15, 2013
Re "Girl's transplant reignites debate," June 13 It is hard to begrudge 10-year-old Sarah Murnagh for receiving a lifesaving lung transplant. But I seriously question the wisdom of her family and friends creating a campaign that resulted in Dr. John Roberts, president of the United Network for Organ Sharing, receiving tens of thousands of e-mails. His e-mail inbox crashed after it received 48,000 messages. How many pleas from other transplant patients was Roberts unable to read because of the campaign for little Sarah?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When she was 4, Doris Pilkington Garimara was uprooted from her home in western Australia and sent to a camp for "half-caste" aboriginals, where she grew up believing she had been abandoned and forgotten by her mother. Decades passed before she learned the full story - one that would not only answer painful questions about her past but help Australians understand one of the ugliest chapters in theirs. Pilkington Garimara and her mother belonged to "the stolen generations" - the estimated 100,000 children of mixed aboriginal and white ancestry who by government edict were snatched from their homes and reared in desolate settlements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2005
Shame on you for devoting so much valuable space to the sorry saga of Tom Sizemore ["Filled With Drama," by Robert W. Welkos, March 23]. He continues to play the victim in a pathetic drama of his own creation rather than accept responsibility for his actions. Barbara Tuss Glassell Park
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Blood Ties" is a largely engrossing drama set in 1974 that works better as an emotional study of brothers on flip sides of the law than as the Sidney Lumet-type crime saga it strives to be. Still, there's a heft to the proceedings that keeps us invested even when the story's various strands start to unravel. Billy Crudup is superb as Frank, an upright New York cop whose older brother, Chris (Clive Owen), is released from prison after serving a lengthy stint for murder. It's a testy reunion for the mismatched pair as old wounds quickly resurface and Chris' foray into honest work proves short-lived . The upshot: Chris' return to his violent, criminal ways eventually forces Frank to choose between honoring his badge or his family.
SPORTS
October 31, 2009
If Jamie McCourt was as claimed, "the face of the Dodgers," the organization is badly in need of a face-lift. Scott Buehner Calabasas :: Given that this is a community property state, 50% of what I say is directed to Frank and 50% is directed to Jamie: Please sell the Dodgers. Now. Darren Pollock Los Angeles :: How life imitates art: My late father Philip Rapp's creation, the Bickersons, has come to life starring Frank and Jamie McCourt. Dad and the original John and Blanche Bickerson, Don Ameche and Frances Langford, must be rolling over -- and laughing -- in their graves!
NATIONAL
February 13, 2013 | By David Horsey
What appears to be the fiery finale to Christopher Dorner's violent rampage across Southern California nearly upstaged President Obama's State of the Union address. As the seconds ticked down to the start of the speech, it seemed as though Anderson Cooper and the folks at CNN were awfully reluctant to break away from the burning cabin near Big Bear where the disgruntled, unhinged ex-cop from the Los Angeles Police Department appeared to be holed up.  Nevertheless, the cable news organizations did their duty and switched from the sensational to the substantial.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009
SERIES Everest: Beyond the Limit: In the third-season premiere of the unscripted adventure series, an avalanche buries a team of climbers (8 p.m. Discovery). In a second new episode, at 9, a storm front closes in on Mt. Everest as climber John Golden presses on to reach the summit on a surgically reconstructed knee, and in a third new episode, at 10, astronaut Scott Parazynski and senior citizen Dawes Eddy attempt a history-making summit bid. Emergency Level One: In the premiere of this unscripted series, two pregnant women are involved in a car crash and a police shooting puts a patient's life in the hands of the trauma team (8 p.m. TLC)
MAGAZINE
April 21, 2002
Thanks to your magazine and writer Michael A. Hiltzik for the article on the "Spider-Man" screenplay saga ("Untangling the Web," Special Hollywood Issue, March 24). One fact seems to get lost in the myriad complications: no one at the Writers Guild has ever read the screenplays concerned. Barney Cohen, Ethan Wiley, Neil Ruttenberg, Frank LaLoggia, several others and I were never afforded a hearing by our peers--that is, other writers. The accepted process of arbitration was circumvented by a toss of a coin in the credits administration, which didn't read the scripts either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1985
Sweeden's Swamp is not a very pretty name, and it covers only 32 acres. Still, the boggy area near Attleboro, Mass., is an important part of the nation's dwindling wetlands. Environmentalists estimate that commercial development, farm drainage, highway construction and the like are destroying 500,000 acres of wetlands a year. As those sloughs, swamps and bogs are paved over or otherwise disappear, so too does the habitat of wildlife and waterfowl.
SPORTS
February 13, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
One of the best stories of this week's Northern Trust Open is the saga of Blayne Barber, a rookie from Auburn. Barber made news last fall when he disqualified himself from the second stage of PGA Tour qualifying school. Barber was haunted after the first stage when he realized a one-stroke penalty he called on himself should have been a two-stroke penalty. He finished the first stage but then, nine days later, called the DQ on himself and forfeited the chance to make this year's PGA Tour.
WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan
The U.S. Navy dispatched its most technologically advanced search aircraft to an empty quarter of the Indian Ocean on Thursday to look for two large pieces of debris that may provide the first physical evidence in the investigation of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Experts were hopeful that the debris would not turn out to be another of the false leads and misinterpreted data that have dogged the investigation into why the Boeing 777 carrying 239...
OPINION
January 11, 2014
The tragic story of Jahi McMath - the 13-year-old girl who was declared brain dead after undergoing surgery last month and whose parents insist on keeping attached to life support - is that rare news event with absolutely no positive angle, no silver lining. Similarly, the experience of reading and editing the letters on the story was gut-wrenching. A few readers had nasty comments for the parents (their letters didn't run), and others directed their anger at the lawyers and other interests seeking to influence Jahi's family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014 | Sandy Banks
It will take more than doctors, judges and medical records to convince Nailah Winkfield that her child is dead. Winkfield's 13-year-old daughter, Jahi McMath, entered an Oakland hospital for tonsil surgery three weeks ago and wound up on life support. Now Jahi is hooked to a ventilator that handles the mechanics of breathing, but she's been declared brain-dead by several physicians, including a court-appointed neurologist from Stanford. Officials at Children's Hospital Oakland want to disconnect the machine; Jahi, they say, has zero chance of recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | Henry Chu
LONDON - Ronnie Biggs, one of the most famous criminals in British history, who helped commit the Great Train Robbery of 1963, broke out of prison, enjoyed a notoriously colorful life on the lam in Brazil and then gave himself up, in thoroughly British fashion, to a tabloid newspaper decades later, has died. He was 84. Biggs died during the night, his official Twitter account said Wednesday morning; a woman at the nursing home where he was living, outside London, confirmed the news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2013
Join Times staff writer Christopher Goffard at 9 a.m. Monday for an L.A. Now Live discussion on The Manhunt  -- a five-part series about the hunt for fugitive ex-LAPD cop Christopher Dorner. In the last chapter of the series, titled The Mountain , Goffard and other Times staff writers examine Dorner's waning struggle to escape and law enforcement efforts to track him down. With illustrations from Doug Stevens, the series has shown several angles of the manhunt for Dorner and offers a level of detail not seen in previous reporting.
WORLD
November 6, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
JERUSALEM - A legal saga that has held Israel's political system in suspense for years came to an end Wednesday as Avigdor Lieberman, one of the country's most controversial and powerful politicians, was acquitted of corruption charges. Lieberman was under legal investigation since the mid-1990s for suspected money laundering and bribery, but years of investigation failed to produce a solid case for an indictment. In December, he was indicted in a separate case exposed during the primary investigation and charged with fraud and breach of trust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2013
Join Times staff writer Christopher Goffard at 9 a.m. Monday for an L.A. Now Live discussion on The Manhunt  -- a five-part series about the hunt for fugitive ex-LAPD cop Christopher Dorner. In the last chapter of the series, titled The Mountain , Goffard and other Times staff writers examine Dorner's waning struggle to escape and law enforcement efforts to track him down. With illustrations from Doug Stevens, the series has shown several angles of the manhunt for Dorner and offers a level of detail not seen in previous reporting.
SPORTS
July 6, 2009 | KURT STREETER
For tennis fans, for sports fans, for fans of drama and skill and guts, what great luck that the Taj Mahal of tennis would produce a second straight match-for-the-ages in the men's final at the All England Club. We thought we'd seen it all last year, a marathon finished in darkness, the Swiss king finished off by a Spanish prince, 9-7 in the fifth set.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Not long ago, the travel website Roads & Kingdoms reported that the African nation of Somaliland had put its faith in a new export to raise itself from poverty: camel meat .  "Somaliland's future prosperity may just ride on the camel," the author wrote. We shall see. As one of the few Americans who has actually partaken of this, um, delicacy, I thought I'd share my experience. It was August 1992. The place was Mogadishu, Somalia, where I was reporting on the civil war that had broken out after longtime dictator Mohamed Siad Barre fled the country, leaving his capital city in the hands of two mutually antagonistic warlords.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
We should apologize for yet another Miley Cyrus headline this week, but a beef between musicians will always be incredibly too irresistible to ignore. For the dozen or so of our readers who have miraculously avoided the latest in all things Cyrus-related, the provocative former teen queen has been in a digital war of sorts with Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor. Quick recap: Cyrus told Rolling Stone her “Wrecking Ball” video was inspired by O'Connor, O'Connor wasn't flattered and issued an open letter advising Cyrus to stop “pimping” herself and rely on her talent.  PHOTOS: Miley Cyrus before and after Disney Cyrus didn't care for O'Connor's harsh, but arguably sage advice and she's responded by throwing a heavy dosage of shade on Twitter.
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