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Sage Herb

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July 29, 2005 | SHAV GLICK
Call it what you like -- jealousy, envy, macho, lack of respect, pettiness -- the latest flap over Danica Patrick and the attention she has received has done no good for either party involved, the Indy Racing League and the Andretti Green Racing team.
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MAGAZINE
May 28, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Drake is a Times staff writer.
IN RECENT DECADES relegated solely to the task of flavoring Thanksgiving turkey stuffing, sage is now being rediscovered as a year-round seasoning. It has a pungent flavor that, when used in abundance, can alienate more people than it pleases. But a light hand and a little creativity bring out the best in sage. The name sage supposedly was derived from the Latin word salvere , meaning to save or to heal. Native to the Mediterranean, it was said to have medicinal properties that could cure such ailments as the common cold and epilepsy.
FOOD
November 9, 1995 | ABBY MANDEL
Sage, especially dried sage, is synonymous with Thanksgiving turkey and stuffing. But in recent years, fresh sage has shown up in many restaurant dishes. Basil had to have a little competition. More than that, fresh sage perks up foods that have a less than robust--but not necessarily bland--flavor. Pork, veal, cheese, beans, pasta, potatoes, squash and onions, as well as poultry, respond to a shower of fresh sage.
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