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Sage Hill School

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BUSINESS
October 9, 2000 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could say Sage Hill School, Orange County's first nonprofit, nondenominational private high school, is being engineered for success. A significant chunk of its $34 million in start-up funds came from local technology players, including former America Online Inc. executive Stephen Johnson and Buy.com Inc. founder Scott Blum. Their fingerprints are all over how students will learn at Sage Hill in Newport Beach, which opened its first phase last month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On that first day in September, as her mother's beat-up station wagon wound its way out of her working-class Santa Ana neighborhood and up to the ocean bluffs and the bright clean air of Newport Beach, 14-year-old Beatriz Arreola felt the fear in the pit of her stomach. "What if I don't fit in?" she asked herself. "What if they don't like me?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000
Re "2 Schools: New and Very Different" (Sept. 6): The opening of the luxurious Sage Hill School and the waiting list at the public Mendez School is a perfect example of why vouchers won't help the students who most need them. Could the students who can't get into the Mendez School use voucher money to attend Sage Hill School? Only if they could come up with the extra $10,000 or so tuition that the voucher would not cover. So just who will benefit from vouchers? LISA ALIZADEH San Clemente
BUSINESS
March 27, 2001
Developers, designers and consultants will discuss the role of technology in current and future real estate developments at a meeting of the Urban Land Institute District Council, Orange County, from 7:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. April 3 at Sage Hill School Library, 20402 Newport Coast Drive, Newport Coast. The event will include a tour of Sage Hill School after the meeting.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2001
Developers, designers and consultants will discuss the role of technology in current and future real estate developments at a meeting of the Urban Land Institute District Council, Orange County, from 7:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. April 3 at Sage Hill School Library, 20402 Newport Coast Drive, Newport Coast. The event will include a tour of Sage Hill School after the meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | Chris Ceballos, (714)-966-7440
James "Walkie" Ray has been appointed chairman of the Orange County High School of the Arts Foundation board of directors for a two-year term. The 28-member board is responsible for fund-raising, publicity and helping with the transition of the school to its new facility in Santa Ana. Ray recently stepped down as chairman of the board of directors for the Discovery Science Center in Santa Ana but still serves as vice chairman of government affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On that first day in September, as her mother's beat-up station wagon wound its way out of her working-class Santa Ana neighborhood and up to the ocean bluffs and the bright clean air of Newport Beach, 14-year-old Beatriz Arreola felt the fear in the pit of her stomach. "What if I don't fit in?" she asked herself. "What if they don't like me?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1998 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of educators and moneyed philanthropists will break ground in November for an independent, nondenominational high school. Plans call for the Sage Hill School, to be located in Newport Beach near the Irvine border, to be a state-of-the-art academy--yet with a strong emphasis on learning by serving outside the school. Students will be expected not only to volunteer their time for the betterment of the larger community but also to show how they are learning from community service.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget hall passes, metal detectors, outdated textbooks, chronic computer shortages and airless classrooms holding too many bored bodies. Imagine a warmly attractive high school on a quiet hillside, where 500 eager students--whose parents may be laborers or entrepreneurs, descendants of California pioneer stock or recent emigres--meet in small groups with motivated teachers in scaled-down classrooms or pleasant outdoor spaces.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1999
Here are building permits valued at $350,000 and up filed recently in Orange County. CORONA DEL MAR * Project: Remodel and addition Address: 966 Sandcastle Drive Value: $425,000 Owner: Keith Huzyak COSTA MESA * Project: Site improvements for new Target store Address: 3030 Harbor Blvd. Value: $1.7 million Owner: Target * Project: New Target store and garden center Address: 3030 Harbor Blvd. Value: $7.4 million Owner: Target FOUNTAIN VALLEY * Project: Remodel clubhouse Address: 10401 Warner Ave.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2000 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could say Sage Hill School, Orange County's first nonprofit, nondenominational private high school, is being engineered for success. A significant chunk of its $34 million in start-up funds came from local technology players, including former America Online Inc. executive Stephen Johnson and Buy.com Inc. founder Scott Blum. Their fingerprints are all over how students will learn at Sage Hill in Newport Beach, which opened its first phase last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000
Re "2 Schools: New and Very Different" (Sept. 6): The opening of the luxurious Sage Hill School and the waiting list at the public Mendez School is a perfect example of why vouchers won't help the students who most need them. Could the students who can't get into the Mendez School use voucher money to attend Sage Hill School? Only if they could come up with the extra $10,000 or so tuition that the voucher would not cover. So just who will benefit from vouchers? LISA ALIZADEH San Clemente
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | Chris Ceballos, (714)-966-7440
James "Walkie" Ray has been appointed chairman of the Orange County High School of the Arts Foundation board of directors for a two-year term. The 28-member board is responsible for fund-raising, publicity and helping with the transition of the school to its new facility in Santa Ana. Ray recently stepped down as chairman of the board of directors for the Discovery Science Center in Santa Ana but still serves as vice chairman of government affairs.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget hall passes, metal detectors, outdated textbooks, chronic computer shortages and airless classrooms holding too many bored bodies. Imagine a warmly attractive high school on a quiet hillside, where 500 eager students--whose parents may be laborers or entrepreneurs, descendants of California pioneer stock or recent emigres--meet in small groups with motivated teachers in scaled-down classrooms or pleasant outdoor spaces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1998 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of educators and moneyed philanthropists will break ground in November for an independent, nondenominational high school. Plans call for the Sage Hill School, to be located in Newport Beach near the Irvine border, to be a state-of-the-art academy--yet with a strong emphasis on learning by serving outside the school. Students will be expected not only to volunteer their time for the betterment of the larger community but also to show how they are learning from community service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
Re "Dreams Lead to Sage Hill School," June 4: The article on Sage Hill private school was interesting, but early on I was put on guard by the word "diversity." We learned that straight-A student Beatriz Arreola was going there on a scholarship and that in exchange she was providing "what the school desperately craves: diversity." I wonder how she feels after reading this? Did they give her the scholarship because of her credentials and grades? Or because she had a Hispanic name and was from a working-class Santa Ana neighborhood, thus being one piece of the diversity equation?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2006 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Unwavering candor illuminates "With Their Eyes: September 11th -- The View From a High School at Ground Zero." In its West Coast premiere at the Chance Theater in Anaheim Hills, this compelling collection of personal accounts by Stuyvesant High School students and staff teems with acute authenticity and assured theatricality. Four blocks from the World Trade Center, magnet school Stuyvesant had barely begun its 2001 fall semester when the attacks occurred.
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