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Sage Plant

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HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
For at least 400 years, herbalists have recommended sage to improve memory, and the plant extract is in Chinese herbal medicines for age-related memory loss. Now British researchers have found that Salvia lavandulaefolia, or Spanish sage, has memory-enhancing benefits. On a test of word recall, 44 college students who had taken capsules containing sage oil remembered more of the 15 words presented earlier in the day than those who took placebos.
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HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
For at least 400 years, herbalists have recommended sage to improve memory, and the plant extract is in Chinese herbal medicines for age-related memory loss. Now British researchers have found that Salvia lavandulaefolia, or Spanish sage, has memory-enhancing benefits. On a test of word recall, 44 college students who had taken capsules containing sage oil remembered more of the 15 words presented earlier in the day than those who took placebos.
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MAGAZINE
May 15, 1994 | Patt Morrison
The august Pasadenans who trundled down Colorado Boulevard in their rose-garlanded carriages on the first day of 1890 were using a now-forgotten language: the dialect of flowers. The same genteel Victorians who put trousers over the bare mahogany legs of their pianos conveyed their blunter sentiments in a 19th-Century FTD code. A sprig of wild sorrel signaled its humorless sender's warning: "He makes a foe who makes a jest." A bouquet of smelly tansy meant: "I declare war against you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1987 | MAYERENE BARKER
Along with gems, precious metals and other artifacts, archeologists who first went into 4,000-year-old Egyptian tombs discovered objects that looked like polished bits of marble. A closer look showed the objects to be seeds from the castor bean plant. A native of Africa, the castor bean plant has become naturalized in warm areas throughout the world.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | CYNTHIA WALKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by fields of alfalfa, corn and giant pumpkins, Donald Toscano dug his hands into a plastic pot containing a scented geranium and focused on its tenacious roots. The open field was hot and dust was everywhere, but Toscano took pains to make sure the plant was securely transplanted. Toscano, 30, is one of 70 participants in Casa Colina's horticultural therapy program for disabled people who work 15 acres just west of Cal Poly Pomona every day, rain or shine.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | ELIZABETH CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In some old gardens, you can feel the spirit of former owners. Perhaps that is why snapdragons look so comfortable in a weathered gray stone urn by a front stoop; four generations ago, snapdragons bloomed there, back when the house was new and the cement planter was white.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1985 | DOUG SMITH
The docents of Cold Creek introduced some potential recruits to the pastoral delights and some of the perils of docenting Saturday afternoon on a two-hour escape into a semi-wild area of the Santa Monica Mountains. The docents are men and women who lead school children, community groups and families on tours of the Cold Creek Preserve and nearby Stunt Ranch, both deep in the mountains south of Calabasas. The preserve is a quiet, nearly hidden canyon where a year-round stream runs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1994
Fire is part of the natural life cycle in the mountains, one that is destructive, yet alsorestorative. Portions of the Santa Monica Mountains blackened in the fall's fires have sprung to life with pink, yellow, blue and purple flossoms. These "fire followers," as they are called, appear only after fires and have joined the usual display of wildflowers that bloom every spring in the mountains ringing the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994
Fire is part of the natural life cycle in the mountains, one that is destructive, yet also restorative. Hillsides blackened in the fall's fires have sprung to life with pink, yellow, blue and purple blossoms. These "fire followers," a they are called, appear only after fires and have joined the usual display of wildflowers that bloom every spring. The seeds of some plants actually need the heat of fire to germinate and can remain dormant for decades before sprouting.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | KITTY MORSE, Kitty Morse is a free-lance writer and cookbook author living in Vista.
"Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme" may bring a romantic tune to the lips, but for many North County growers, fresh herbs are cause for more practical consideration as they respond to the increasing demand for freshly cut herbs. Taylor's Herb Gardens in Vista may well be the granddaddy of local herb farms. It was first developed 43 years ago by Kent Taylor, and today is among of the world's largest. The manicured gardens encompass several microclimates, each with its own peculiarities.
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