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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992
I believe The Times goofed on the photo on Page B6 in the Metro/Valley section on Sept. 11 that accompanied the story "Hurricane Relief Trucks Near Florida." The caption describes a truck "as it leaves Baton Rouge, La.," Yet, if you study it closely, the road sign at the right describes the miles to Deming, N.M., Las Cruces, N.M. and El Paso. Besides, Louisiana is not noted for sagebrush. BRAD ACCOSTA Tujunga
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Some 50 political leaders from nine Western states gathered in Salt Lake City this month to discuss plans to wrest control of millions of acres of public lands from the federal government. One wonders whether, like a dog chasing a car, they've figured out what they would do with the land if they got hold of it? In any case, that's unlikely to happen, based on decades of court battles and settled law. Nevertheless, these angry legislators and local commissioners seem determined to waste time and energy on this futile effort, propelled by a warped sense of history and priorities.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Some 50 political leaders from nine Western states gathered in Salt Lake City this month to discuss plans to wrest control of millions of acres of public lands from the federal government. One wonders whether, like a dog chasing a car, they've figured out what they would do with the land if they got hold of it? In any case, that's unlikely to happen, based on decades of court battles and settled law. Nevertheless, these angry legislators and local commissioners seem determined to waste time and energy on this futile effort, propelled by a warped sense of history and priorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a proposal to list the bistate sage grouse as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, affording special protections to about 5,000 birds along the California-Nevada border. The bird is a genetically distinct subpopulation of the Mono Basin sage grouse, and officials were petitioned to list it for protection in 2005. In California, the birds are found in Inyo, Alpine and Mono counties. Federal biologists estimate that about six groups of birds are occupying about half of their historical range.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011
"Cowboys & Aliens" isn't the first movie to mix sci-fi and western genres. A new DVD set, "A Big Box of Cowboys, Aliens, Robots and Death Rays," features eight vintage sagebrush sagas that also enter the sci-fi zone. Perhaps the most famous is 1935's "Radio Ranch" with Gene Autry. "Radio Ranch" is actually an edited feature-length version of Autry's serial "The Phantom Empire," which finds the singing cowboy discovering a race of humans living in a metropolis under the earth. The set also features films starring such famed movie cowpokes as Tim McCoy in 1936's "Ghost Patrol," Ken Maynard in 1932's "Tombstone Canyon," Ray "Crash" Corrigan in 1941's "Saddle Mountain Roundup" and Bill Cody Sr. and Jr. in 1935's "Vanishing Riders.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2009 | Ashley Powers
On an overcast morning in stark western Nevada, where towns are mostly remnants of mining booms past, Pam Eddy dresses each table in her modest cafe with French mustard and fancy tomato ketchup. Coffee drip-drops, an ABBA album hums. An hour crawls by. Nothing. Pam's husband, Bob, loses himself in photos of Mina's more prosperous youth. Bob is white-haired and blue-eyed and sports a maroon trucker's cap, which depicts a cowboy, a crayfish and the oxymoron DESERT LOBSTER.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a proposal to list the bistate sage grouse as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, affording special protections to about 5,000 birds along the California-Nevada border. The bird is a genetically distinct subpopulation of the Mono Basin sage grouse, and officials were petitioned to list it for protection in 2005. In California, the birds are found in Inyo, Alpine and Mono counties. Federal biologists estimate that about six groups of birds are occupying about half of their historical range.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1996
I was distressed to note in "Kingdom of Yahoo Moves West" (Commentary, Jan. 29) that Tom Chaffin, identified as a history teacher at Emory University, failed to follow the first rule of history teachers: Get the facts straight. A single phone call by the writer or a Times fact-checker would have discovered that Montana does, in fact, have speed limits. And that call would also have revealed that I did not sign anything; these speed limits and stiffer fines took effect automatically, thanks to our Legislature's foresight in 1973.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2010 | Hector Tobar
After several days without rain, and with the thermometer dancing near 80, I finally surrendered. My little patch of fescue grass was turning blond. So I turned on the sprinklers long enough for a really good soak. Every Angeleno knows we're living on water siphoned from other parts of the state. And it feels wrong somehow to drench your lawn in the middle of Southern California winter -- even on one of the two allowed watering days. But it's been another year of paltry precipitation.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writers
Like a lot of western ranchers, Stan Davidson needs public grazing lands to survive. He owns a small ranch, but needs additional pasture in the spring and summer. Suitable land not owned by the government is too expensive to buy. Unlike a lot of western ranchers, Davidson has to pay fair-market value for the public grazing lands he uses--and he pays it to his competitors, who have exclusive government permits to graze those lands. The permittees pay the Bureau of Land Management $1.86 a month for each cow allowed to graze the vast expanse of BLM-managed public land.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011
"Cowboys & Aliens" isn't the first movie to mix sci-fi and western genres. A new DVD set, "A Big Box of Cowboys, Aliens, Robots and Death Rays," features eight vintage sagebrush sagas that also enter the sci-fi zone. Perhaps the most famous is 1935's "Radio Ranch" with Gene Autry. "Radio Ranch" is actually an edited feature-length version of Autry's serial "The Phantom Empire," which finds the singing cowboy discovering a race of humans living in a metropolis under the earth. The set also features films starring such famed movie cowpokes as Tim McCoy in 1936's "Ghost Patrol," Ken Maynard in 1932's "Tombstone Canyon," Ray "Crash" Corrigan in 1941's "Saddle Mountain Roundup" and Bill Cody Sr. and Jr. in 1935's "Vanishing Riders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2010 | Hector Tobar
After several days without rain, and with the thermometer dancing near 80, I finally surrendered. My little patch of fescue grass was turning blond. So I turned on the sprinklers long enough for a really good soak. Every Angeleno knows we're living on water siphoned from other parts of the state. And it feels wrong somehow to drench your lawn in the middle of Southern California winter -- even on one of the two allowed watering days. But it's been another year of paltry precipitation.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2009 | Ashley Powers
On an overcast morning in stark western Nevada, where towns are mostly remnants of mining booms past, Pam Eddy dresses each table in her modest cafe with French mustard and fancy tomato ketchup. Coffee drip-drops, an ABBA album hums. An hour crawls by. Nothing. Pam's husband, Bob, loses himself in photos of Mina's more prosperous youth. Bob is white-haired and blue-eyed and sports a maroon trucker's cap, which depicts a cowboy, a crayfish and the oxymoron DESERT LOBSTER.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
Around every bend of the dirt road, Tom Warren recites another name, another date. The Sheep, the Amazon, the Winters, the Suzie. The list goes on and on. It is a chronicle of loss, of wildfires ravaging one of America's mythic landscapes, the sweeping, lonely sagebrush country of the West. On mountainside after mountainside here, in valley after valley, the richly textured, muted green of sage has yielded to a monotonous, dried-out sea of dirty-blond cheatgrass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Bob McCord, whose Sagebrush Cantina restaurant, open since 1974, became a popular destination that fueled the growth of Calabasas and its historic old town, has died. He was 69. McCord died Monday at his Burbank home of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare brain disorder, the restaurant announced. "Bob is one of the pioneers and legendary characters who has added to the color and success of our community," said Dennis Washburn, a Calabasas city councilman.
NEWS
September 23, 2007 | Shannon Dininny, Associated Press
HANFORD REACH NATIONAL MONUMENT, Wash. -- When wildfires raced through tinder-dry grass and sagebrush on the Hanford Reach National Monument this summer, much of the worry centered on whether flames would reach radioactive waste at the neighboring Hanford nuclear reservation. Now wildlife officials are taking stock of the devastation to the charred monument itself, which stretches along a free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River known for salmon runs, bird habitat and rare plant life. "The No.
TRAVEL
August 10, 2003 | James T. Yenckel, Special to The Times
Like any proper ranch, Idaho Rocky Mountain Ranch keeps horses, but this place, in the heart of central Idaho's immense Sawtooth National Recreation Area, is also a haven for two-footed creatures. My wife, Sandy, and I, both avid hikers, spent a week here, mostly on our own two feet, exploring the trails of an area that's less frequented than the big national parks. We did succumb to the equine allure one evening, climbing aboard a wagon drawn by Belgian draft horses that hauled us over sagebrush foothills to a sunset cookout.
TRAVEL
July 19, 1992 | GEOFFREY O'GARA, O'Gara is a free-lance writer based in Lander, Wyo., and a contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler magazine.
We live in a contradictory age, when city slickers pay a fortune to become weekend buckaroos herding cattle in the Wyoming outback, yet disdain red meat at the dinner table in favor of some pale bottom-trash fish with a sprig of parsley in its mouth. I'm sorry, Hopalong, but this won't do. If you seek the authentic western experience you had better be prepared to sink your canines into a serious chunk of bovine.
NEWS
August 9, 2005 | SUSAN J. TWEIT
ONE HOT Saturday morning in early July, my husband, Richard, and I loaded our Great Dane into the van along with a mound of baggage and set off on a two-day, 1,234-mile road trip from Salida, Colo., to Portland, Ore. As Isis settled onto her dog bed, we swung onto Highway 50, headed across the inland West.
TRAVEL
August 10, 2003 | James T. Yenckel, Special to The Times
Like any proper ranch, Idaho Rocky Mountain Ranch keeps horses, but this place, in the heart of central Idaho's immense Sawtooth National Recreation Area, is also a haven for two-footed creatures. My wife, Sandy, and I, both avid hikers, spent a week here, mostly on our own two feet, exploring the trails of an area that's less frequented than the big national parks. We did succumb to the equine allure one evening, climbing aboard a wagon drawn by Belgian draft horses that hauled us over sagebrush foothills to a sunset cookout.
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