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NATIONAL
May 16, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
As a valet opened her car door, Martha Gallardo stepped out, glanced up and caught a gleam of afternoon sunlight bouncing off the iconic Sahara sign above her. "I've never been here, but it's beautiful," she told the valet. "It's a shame that it's closing. " Gallardo, of Henderson, Nev., said she wanted to see the venerable casino and pay her respects before it vanished. The Moroccan-themed hotel and casino closes Monday, ending a 59-year run. Once a hangout for Elvis Presley and the Beatles, the resort was stricken in recent years by the recession.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Have we talked about the Sahara tent yet? Let's talk about the Sahara tent. Approximately the size of a small airplane hangar, it's where Coachella puts the big, dumb dance music that for many these days serves as the festival's main draw. And Friday night it was where Martin Garrix and Zedd -- two of the genre's youngest, most successful stars -- undammed the pent-up energy of 10,000 or so Millennials awash in hormones (and whatever else). It was almost frightening, the level of intensity in the space when 17-year-old Garrix dropped the central riff of his hit "Animals," which instantly turned the crowd into a sea of outstretched limbs.
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NATIONAL
March 12, 2011 | By Ashley Powers and Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
The Sahara was once an exotic desert locale where Frank Sinatra could enjoy a cocktail and bathing beauties were paid to frolic in the Garden of Allah pool. In recent years, the hotel-casino has sunk to touting $1 blackjack and a NASCAR Cafe known for its 6-pound burrito. Now the 59-year-old-icon of the Las Vegas Strip is shutting its doors, yet another victim of a deep recession that has squelched the city's tourism for more than three years. In southern Nevada, casinos are frequently bought, sold, remodeled or imploded to make way for new resorts ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
BORREGO SPRINGS, Calif. - Locals call it "The Miracle of March. " If spring rains and temperatures are just right, the forbidding mountains and parched badlands here are transformed into dazzling panoramas of wildflowers that draw thousands of tourists. The crowds provide a major boost to Borrego Springs, a community of about 3,500 permanent residents in the heart of 640,000-acre Anza-Borrego Desert State Park. When blossoms abound - every five to seven years or so - visitors spend freely on gasoline, groceries, souvenirs, sun hats and cold drinks as they seek directions to "flower hot spots.
OPINION
December 11, 2006
Re "Don't give him rewrite," Column One, Dec. 8 Message to author Clive Cussler: I can understand you want creative control over your work, but in this case you're wrong about suing the producers of "Sahara." The motion picture was great. You have nothing to be ashamed of. I think they made a fantastic effort to turn a good book into a good movie. Clive, don't give up on Hollywood. I would like to see more of your Dirk Pitt novels turned into motion pictures. PHILIP RONNEY Northridge
OPINION
October 6, 2004
Re "As Reservoirs Recede, Fears of a Water Shortage Rise," Oct. 3: Your story on falling reservoir levels in the West failed to mention the 800-pound gorilla: global warming. The steadily hotter and drier weather of the West fits perfectly with global warming models. Everything suggests that things will only get worse. It is possible that much of the West will have Sahara conditions by 2100. Yet governments continue to be in denial about the very existence of a phenomenon that appears already to be costing us millions of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Staff writer Richard Cromelin sorts out the festival, hour by hour: NOON CATCH IT IF YOU CAN DJ MEHDI (Sahara, 12-2) 1 P.M. DON'T MISS AMERICAN BANG Aw, lookout! This Nashville group's rural throwback sound is as infectious as it is familiar. (Mojave, 1:15-1:55) ALSO ROGUE WAVE Atmospheric, sometimes meditative arty rock. They have their nice moments on record, but not a lot that stick. (Coachella, 1:30-2:15) 2 P.M. DON'T MISS REDD KROSS Look at it as a victory lap of sorts for one of the enduring bands from the L.A. rock scene.
NEWS
April 27, 1989
Rioters have stabbed, stoned or clubbed to death at least 40 people and wounded nearly 700 in two days of attacks against Senegalese living in the Mauritanian capital of Nouakchott, hospital sources said. Troops were on patrol in the city and in Dakar, capital of neighboring Senegal, where Mauritanian traders and shops have been attacked. There was no reliable word on the number of casualties outside Nouakchott. Both governments appealed for calm and began repatriating victims who wanted to leave.
OPINION
April 18, 2007
Re "How do a bestselling novel, an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, a pair of Hollywood hotties and a No. 1 opening at the box office add up to $78 million of red ink?" April 15 I find it interesting that some of the items that were frowned on in the "Sahara" production budget are the very same things that allow filming to take place in our city. While it is true that "bribe" is a bad choice of words, it is the one that most accurately describes what has become accepted practice to facilitate on-location filming in almost every part of town.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Bernardo Bertolucci admits putting his cast and crew through an ordeal to make "The Sheltering Sky," a film about an American couple seeking to revive their marriage deep in the Sahara. The film will have a gala premiere tonight at the year-old Opera-Bastille. Based on Paul Bowles' best-selling novel by the same name, the film stars Debra Winger and John Malkovich as Kit and Port Moresby, sophisticated New York artists who go into the African desert to save their failing marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
High-altitude dust blown thousands of miles across the Pacific from Asian and African deserts can make it rain and snow in the Sierra Nevada, according to new research that suggests tiny particles from afar play a role in California's water supply. The study, published Thursday in the online edition of the journal Science, grew out of researchers' questions about two similar Sierra storms in winter 2009. Even though the storm systems carried the same amount of water vapor, one produced 40% more precipitation than the other.
WORLD
February 18, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
TIMBUKTU, Mali - It didn't matter that Timbuktu had been occupied by Islamist militias notorious for meting out 100 lashes to young women who flirted with, or even talked to, men. When Mamou Maiga encountered a dazzling young man while out for a walk, her world turned upside down. "He had beautiful eyes and a gentle smile," recalls Maiga, 21, smiling shyly as she remembered that day in mid-September. "He asked me if he could drop me at my house. I saw no problems. " His name was Adama.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Jay Jones
SLS Las Vegas , a trendy resort to be built on the grounds of the former Sahara, is scheduled to open in fall 2014 and promises to bring several Southern California clubs and restaurants to the Nevada desert. The former Sahara has been surrounded by chain link fencing since owners Sbe , whose chairman and chief executive is Sam Nazarian, closed the historic hotel about two years ago. The company is pumping $415 million into renovating the property, which has stood on the Strip since 1952.
SCIENCE
January 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have identified what they believe to be the first meteorite to originate from the Martian crust, a 2.1-billion-year-old specimen that contains about 10 times more water than any other space rock from the Red Planet. Discovered in the Sahara, the rock - called NWA 7034 - is unlike any of the 110-odd Martian meteorites yet found on Earth, according to a report published online Thursday by the journal Science. Experts said it provided an unprecedented close-up view of the Martian surface and may help scientists understand what NASA's Curiosity and Opportunity rovers are seeing as they roam the terrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Antoine Ashley, a.k.a. Sahara Davenport, died Monday of heart failure, a rep said in a statement issued Wednesday. Ashley, a 27-year-old drag performer, competed as Davenport on the second season of "RuPaul's Drag Race" and was the six-year boyfriend of Season 3 performer Manila Luzon, a.k.a. Karl Westerberg, who'll appear in the upcoming "RuPaul's Drag Race: All-Stars" starting later this month. "Antoine passed away due to heart failure on October 1, 2012, at John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland," the rep said via NewNowNext.com , the Logo network's online presence.  “ I thank God for giving me an Angel Antoine Ashley to share with the rest of the world," his mother said in the statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Antoine Ashley, better known as the drag queen Sahara Davenport who competed on the second season of "RuPaul's Drag Race," has died at age 27. " Logo is profoundly saddened by the passing of Antoine Ashley who fans around the world knew and loved as Sahara Davenport," the Logo network posted Tuesday on its Facebook page. "He was an amazing artist and entertainer who'll be deeply missed by his Logo family. Our hearts and prayers go out to his family, especially his boyfriend Karl, in their time of need.
FOOD
August 15, 1996 | CHARLES PERRY
One of humanity's little buddies in the plant kingdom is the family Chenopodiaceae, though it's mostly known to us from weeds with the unpromising names goosefoot and pigweed. "Goosefoot" (which is what the botanical name Chenopodium literally means) refers to the web-footed shape of the leaves and "pigweed" to the plump look of the plants when they're laden with seeds. All the Chenopodiaceae are known for prolific seed production.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
Hali Helfgott traveled through Morocco in March but was not convinced about seeing the Sahara desert - a visit would require a 14-hour round trip by car. Thanks to her persuasive guide, the excursion turned out to be one of the highlights of her trip. "I was struck by the power and peace of the desert, how the sand goes on and on as far as the eye can see," Helfgott said. The Hollywood resident captured this photo from atop a camel with her iPhone 4. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The iconic Sahara Hotel & Casino is coming back as a redesigned and reconceived SLS Las Vegas that's expected to open in 2014. Philippe Starck will do the interior design at what will become a resort with name-brand restaurants, clubs and more than 1,600 guest rooms and suites. L.A.-based hotel and restaurant developer sbe, headed by Sam Nazarian and real estate investment firm Stockbridge Capital Group LLC announced Tuesday that they have raised $300 million to redo the hotel at the north end of the Strip.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
Hali Helfgott traveled through Morocco in March but was not convinced about seeing the Sahara desert - a visit would require a 14-hour round trip by car. Thanks to her persuasive guide, the excursion turned out to be one of the highlights of her trip. "I was struck by the power and peace of the desert, how the sand goes on and on as far as the eye can see," Helfgott said. The Hollywood resident captured this photo from atop a camel with her iPhone 4. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
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