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Sahara Desert

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April 16, 2012 | By Dylan Hernandez
Matt Kemp has been unstoppable. The Dodgers have been too. Leading the major leagues in all three of the triple crown categories through Sunday, Kemp became the first player ever to win consecutive National League player-of-the-week awards in the first two weeks of a season. He also claimed the prize in the final week of 2011, making him the first player to win it three weeks running since its inception in 1974. "He's the best player in baseball, and probably the world, right now," Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw said.
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IMAGE
February 28, 2014 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Beckoning warmth, longer days, the open road. Wasting time, getting lost, letting curiosity be your guide. It's the season of wanderlust. So is it any wonder that for spring collections, many designers looked to the world of travel for inspiration? The destinations that inspired were far and wide, from the countryside of Japan (Joseph Altuzarra's sexy pencil skirts slit sky-high, in menswear-inspired ticking stripes or indigo patchwork silks inspired by traditional Japanese boro clothing)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1999
Subtle changes in the Earth's orbit may have been responsible for the abrupt transformation of a large region of North Africa from a lush garden into the Sahara Desert. Radiocarbon dating shows that the changes occurred in two phases, one beginning 6,700 years ago and a sharper change beginning 4,000 years ago. During those periods, temperatures rose and precipitation dropped sharply, German researchers report in the July 15 Geophysical Research Letters.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It's a long, arduous and well-worn route. Hopeful Africans travel north through Niger, Mali and Algeria, crossing the Sahara desert to reach Europe, find work and send money home to their families. The exodus often goes nightmarishly wrong for the migrants. They must trust their lives to unscrupulous smugglers. If someone hasn't been paid along the route, they are sometimes abandoned by their driver. If a vehicle breaks down in the desert, there is no guarantee that help will ever come.
WORLD
August 10, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Niger's army seized the last outpost of disgruntled soldiers who mutinied last week to demand unpaid wages and better conditions, the Defense Ministry said. The eastern garrison of Ngourti, where the mutineers had been holding out after being pushed from earlier strongholds, is about 1,000 miles from the capital, Niamey, in the Sahara desert. One death on each side has been reported, but 217 soldiers have been arrested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990
The Sahara Club, a group of plant-crushing motorcycle enthusiasts is aptly named. Large portions of the Sahara desert and other eroded wastelands of North Africa are man-made. In historical (that is, Roman Empire) times, many now ugly and hostile areas of North Africa were verdant and friendly. They became deserts after men cut down all of the trees and their goats nibbled all of the smaller plants out of existence. MARK SEECOF Santa Monica
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | From Reuters
Five teen-age Danish criminals face a six-week survival course in the Sahara desert in a last-ditch effort to reform them. "We have tried all the traditional methods without success," Erik Juul, head of Odense's social services, said last week. "We want to see how the group tackles tough problems in a place where they cannot possibly run away and ultimately to turn their destructive behavior into something constructive." Three social workers will accompany the five youths, all hardened offenders aged between 15 and 17.
WORLD
February 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Three ultra-endurance athletes ran the equivalent of about two marathons a day for 111 days to become the first modern runners to cross the Sahara Desert's grueling 4,000 miles. "I would never consider crossing the Sahara on foot again," said American runner Charlie Engle, 44, hours after he and the others completed the run at the Red Sea. Engle, Ray Zahab, 38, of Canada and Kevin Lin, 30, of Taiwan ran through Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Niger, Libya and Egypt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Environmentalists have argued that the Sahara Desert, the world's largest, has been steadily increasing its size southward as a result of drought and land mismanagement, particularly overgrazing, increased cultivation and firewood cutting. But evidence of the extent of this process, called desertification, has been largely anecdotal. Researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
WORLD
August 28, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two hijackers who commandeered a jetliner from Sudan's Darfur region and diverted it to a remote desert airstrip in Libya surrendered and freed all hostages after a daylong standoff, officials said. Sudan's consul in the Sahara desert oasis of Kufra, where the plane landed, said the two Darfur men were brought into the airport's VIP lounge. Also freed were crew members whom the hijackers had continued to hold even after releasing 87 passengers earlier. The diplomat, Mohammed Balla Othman, who spoke to the Associated Press by telephone from the VIP room, said that in the last stages of negotiations, the hijackers were asking for asylum in Libya.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
High-altitude dust blown thousands of miles across the Pacific from Asian and African deserts can make it rain and snow in the Sierra Nevada, according to new research that suggests tiny particles from afar play a role in California's water supply. The study, published Thursday in the online edition of the journal Science, grew out of researchers' questions about two similar Sierra storms in winter 2009. Even though the storm systems carried the same amount of water vapor, one produced 40% more precipitation than the other.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
Hali Helfgott traveled through Morocco in March but was not convinced about seeing the Sahara desert - a visit would require a 14-hour round trip by car. Thanks to her persuasive guide, the excursion turned out to be one of the highlights of her trip. "I was struck by the power and peace of the desert, how the sand goes on and on as far as the eye can see," Helfgott said. The Hollywood resident captured this photo from atop a camel with her iPhone 4. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
SPORTS
April 16, 2012 | By Dylan Hernandez
Matt Kemp has been unstoppable. The Dodgers have been too. Leading the major leagues in all three of the triple crown categories through Sunday, Kemp became the first player ever to win consecutive National League player-of-the-week awards in the first two weeks of a season. He also claimed the prize in the final week of 2011, making him the first player to win it three weeks running since its inception in 1974. "He's the best player in baseball, and probably the world, right now," Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw said.
WORLD
June 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Gunmen shot and killed a U.S. aid worker in the capital of Mauritania, an ally of the West in its fight against growing Al Qaeda activity in northwest Africa and the Sahara Desert. A top official from the military government said the attack and the threat of terrorism showed how important it was to ensure the army was not sidelined as Mauritania prepares for elections to restore democracy next month under pressure from donors. The American, the director of an aid group, was shot in the head in the center of the usually quiet city of Nouakchott.
NEWS
February 1, 2009 | Gregory Katz, Katz writes for the Associated Press.
A group of adventurers set out from London for Timbuktu in early January, traveling by flying car. The vehicle, which looks like a dune buggy with a huge fan and a paragliding wing attached, is called the Parajet Skycar. It was designed by self-taught engineer and inventor Giles Cardozo to fly at up to 70 mph and drive about 120 mph. "You jump into the driver's seat, open up the throttle, the fan spins up, the wind launches, and you just accelerate down the runway and within 50 to 100 yards you're flying, you just take off," he said.
WORLD
August 28, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two hijackers who commandeered a jetliner from Sudan's Darfur region and diverted it to a remote desert airstrip in Libya surrendered and freed all hostages after a daylong standoff, officials said. Sudan's consul in the Sahara desert oasis of Kufra, where the plane landed, said the two Darfur men were brought into the airport's VIP lounge. Also freed were crew members whom the hijackers had continued to hold even after releasing 87 passengers earlier. The diplomat, Mohammed Balla Othman, who spoke to the Associated Press by telephone from the VIP room, said that in the last stages of negotiations, the hijackers were asking for asylum in Libya.
WORLD
June 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Gunmen shot and killed a U.S. aid worker in the capital of Mauritania, an ally of the West in its fight against growing Al Qaeda activity in northwest Africa and the Sahara Desert. A top official from the military government said the attack and the threat of terrorism showed how important it was to ensure the army was not sidelined as Mauritania prepares for elections to restore democracy next month under pressure from donors. The American, the director of an aid group, was shot in the head in the center of the usually quiet city of Nouakchott.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1988
An archeologist working for the U.S. Geological Survey has discovered a wealth of evidence under the Sahara Desert to show that early humans lived in the area 150,000 to 300,000 years ago. A few test pits already have turned up hundreds of stone tools lying on ancient land surfaces now blanketed by the sand of a desert that has been spreading for thousands of years. William P.
WORLD
February 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Three ultra-endurance athletes ran the equivalent of about two marathons a day for 111 days to become the first modern runners to cross the Sahara Desert's grueling 4,000 miles. "I would never consider crossing the Sahara on foot again," said American runner Charlie Engle, 44, hours after he and the others completed the run at the Red Sea. Engle, Ray Zahab, 38, of Canada and Kevin Lin, 30, of Taiwan ran through Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Niger, Libya and Egypt.
SCIENCE
December 30, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
More than half the dust needed to fertilize the Brazilian rain forest originates on a dry lakebed in Africa, according to a team of researchers. About 50 million tons of dust are transported by the wind from Africa to Brazil's Amazon basin each year, and 56% of the dust originates in the Bodele Depression on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert, new satellite measurements indicate.
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