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WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires, and the sour smell of far too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming. By April or May they'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires, and the sour smell of far too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming. By April or May they'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
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WORLD
May 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations has received only 15% of the $92 million it needs this year to help save about 300,000 children from starvation in the arid Sahel belt, an official said. The world body launched an appeal in March to help feed more than 5 million people at risk of malnutrition in four countries bordering the Sahara desert: Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso and Mauritania. "In 2006, malnutrition will kill some 300,000 children unless urgent action is taken," Esther Guluma of UNICEF said.
OPINION
January 25, 2013 | By Malcolm Potts
The jihadists stoning women to death in Mali and taking hostages in Algeria are harbingers of much worse to come. Osama bin Laden may be dead, but Al Qaeda in Africa now threatens an area twice the size of Germany. Mali is just one country in the Sahel, a million square miles of arid and semi-arid countryside stretching from the Atlantic to the Red Sea. The region has always been subject to episodes of starvation and brutal tribal conflicts, and things are now deteriorating further.
WORLD
June 23, 2005 | From Reuters
Millions of people on the southern fringe of the Sahara Desert face severe food shortages unless donors provide more funds, the United Nations said Wednesday. The U.N. World Food Program said it had received only a third of the $11 million it needs to fund emergency operations in Niger and Mali, two of the world's poorest nations, where drought and a locust plague have triggered a food crisis.
SPORTS
August 24, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Pau Gasol has experienced a wide range of emotions this off-season. He is excited the Lakers acquired Dwight Howard and Steve Nash in hopes of squeezing out more NBA championships.  He is relieved the Lakers made such deals without trading him. He was filled with pride as the leader of the Spanish men's basketball team and his country's flag bearer in the 2012 London Olympics, though he was disappointed Spain lost in the gold-medal match to the...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1995 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Something old, something new. That's the recipe at both an established German restaurant and a fresh-faced Persian eatery that does wonders with traditional kebabs. * The Alpine Inn, sporting a new, expanded menu, is a venerable Garden Grove institution, more or less a neighborhood cafe crossed with a Bavarian hunting lodge. It is woodsy, clubby and softly lit, decorated with beer steins and a mounted deer's head.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | ROGER MAY, Reuters
Just a few months ago, the Sahel region of western Africa was threatened with drought and famine of Ethiopian proportions. Now the Sahel, on the southern limits of the Sahara, expects bumper crops amid signs of changing food development strategies. An unpublished report by the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF) says that good rains since July have ended a decade-long drought in the region, which divides West Africa's coastal states from the desert.
OPINION
January 25, 2013 | By Malcolm Potts
The jihadists stoning women to death in Mali and taking hostages in Algeria are harbingers of much worse to come. Osama bin Laden may be dead, but Al Qaeda in Africa now threatens an area twice the size of Germany. Mali is just one country in the Sahel, a million square miles of arid and semi-arid countryside stretching from the Atlantic to the Red Sea. The region has always been subject to episodes of starvation and brutal tribal conflicts, and things are now deteriorating further.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | ALEX VEIGA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Equipment installed around the Gulf of Mexico to screen the air for particles emanating from two planned nuclear reactors in Cuba could be the key to unraveling the mystery of red tide. The air samplers were put into service by the Department of Defense, which first funded the project three years ago. Funds for the Caribbean Radiation Early Warning System ran out in September, but one college is now using the technology to trace the microscopic algae that causes red tide.
SPORTS
August 24, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Pau Gasol has experienced a wide range of emotions this off-season. He is excited the Lakers acquired Dwight Howard and Steve Nash in hopes of squeezing out more NBA championships.  He is relieved the Lakers made such deals without trading him. He was filled with pride as the leader of the Spanish men's basketball team and his country's flag bearer in the 2012 London Olympics, though he was disappointed Spain lost in the gold-medal match to the...
WORLD
May 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations has received only 15% of the $92 million it needs this year to help save about 300,000 children from starvation in the arid Sahel belt, an official said. The world body launched an appeal in March to help feed more than 5 million people at risk of malnutrition in four countries bordering the Sahara desert: Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso and Mauritania. "In 2006, malnutrition will kill some 300,000 children unless urgent action is taken," Esther Guluma of UNICEF said.
WORLD
June 23, 2005 | From Reuters
Millions of people on the southern fringe of the Sahara Desert face severe food shortages unless donors provide more funds, the United Nations said Wednesday. The U.N. World Food Program said it had received only a third of the $11 million it needs to fund emergency operations in Niger and Mali, two of the world's poorest nations, where drought and a locust plague have triggered a food crisis.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | ALEX VEIGA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Equipment installed around the Gulf of Mexico to screen the air for particles emanating from two planned nuclear reactors in Cuba could be the key to unraveling the mystery of red tide. The air samplers were put into service by the Department of Defense, which first funded the project three years ago. Funds for the Caribbean Radiation Early Warning System ran out in September, but one college is now using the technology to trace the microscopic algae that causes red tide.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1995 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Something old, something new. That's the recipe at both an established German restaurant and a fresh-faced Persian eatery that does wonders with traditional kebabs. * The Alpine Inn, sporting a new, expanded menu, is a venerable Garden Grove institution, more or less a neighborhood cafe crossed with a Bavarian hunting lodge. It is woodsy, clubby and softly lit, decorated with beer steins and a mounted deer's head.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | ROGER MAY, Reuters
Just a few months ago, the Sahel region of western Africa was threatened with drought and famine of Ethiopian proportions. Now the Sahel, on the southern limits of the Sahara, expects bumper crops amid signs of changing food development strategies. An unpublished report by the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF) says that good rains since July have ended a decade-long drought in the region, which divides West Africa's coastal states from the desert.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991
Siemens Solar Industries in Camarillo said it won a $20-million contract to supply, install and maintain photovoltaic systems in the West African countries of Cape Verde, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania and Senegal. Siemens will provide 410 pumping systems, 89 cooling systems, 303 lighting systems and 33 battery charging systems to the Comite Permanent Interstats De Lutte Contre La Secheresse Dans Le Sahel, an organization founded to combat drought in the region.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
An upsurge in a meningitis epidemic that doctors thought was under control killed 241 people in the last week, bringing the death toll in Burkina Faso this year to 1,379, official figures showed. The number of dead was the highest weekly total this year from the disease, which is a seasonal problem in the dry early months of the year in West Africa's arid Sahel region, south of the Sahara.
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